Mr. Andrews' info

Jan 5, 2001
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Hi All,

<FONT COLOR="ff0000">I have no idea what Smith wrote to Bell. My "gut" is that the captain told the chief to disregard anything Ismay said or demanded. But, that's just my guess.

One can imagine Ismay reading the note over Bell's shoulder. LOL!

<FONT COLOR="119911">I would have to agree with Captain Dave on this one. If it where me I would have told Bell to disregard Ismay and just to brush him off.

It sounds logical, but one point I was wondering about was why note use the: telephone from 'Wheelhouse on the navigating bridge and the engine room.' It would be quicker than a note and you could make sure Bell understood.

One other thing, though; didn't Bell say he would get it done right away? This seems strange if he was told to ignore Ismay.

Perhaps it will remain a mystery...

Best regards,

Mark.
 

George Behe

Member
Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Mark!

>One other thing, though; didn't Bell say he would >get it done right away?
> This seems strange if he was >told to ignore Ismay.

You don't suppose Bell was asked to ... kill Ismay, do you? :)

All my best,

George
 
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James Douglas Smith

Guest
Excuse the stupid question, but when precisely was this note sent, and who remembered seeing it?

I seem to remember reading somewhere (can't look up the reference--maybe someone else can verify my statement or prove me wrong) that Titanic was scheduled to light up more boilers in the near future--or perhaps had already lit up a couple of new ones. If Smith didn't know the ship would actually sink when he sent the note, maybe the note read:

"Never mind about those extra boilers."

Or, if the boilers were already lit, here's a conspiracy theory: Smith ordered the fires in the extra boilers put out, hoping that the authorities in New York (who were certain to find out Titanic had struck ice) wouldn't know that Titanic had been travelling so fast through the ice field.

Or maybe I'm just babbling and have no real idea what I'm talking about . . .

Jim
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Another very real possibility for the contents of Captain Smith's "word of hand" message to Chief Engineer Bell-- keep up as much steam as possible. Although boiler explosions played no part in the Titanic story, they were greatly feared in 1912. The captain may have worried that his chief engineer would "blow down" the boilers as a safety precaution, leaving the ship without power to maneuver.

Or, Smith may have suggested that all steam be released from boiler rooms in danger of flooding, this as a precaution against explosions.

Then again, Smith may have requested Bell to switch the appropriate lighting circuits to the emergency generator as a precaution against failure of the main dynamos.

There are many, many possibilities. Fun to speculate, but the only known fact is that Olliver carried the note from Smith's hand to Bell's hand.

-- David G. Brown
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi James!

Wow -- you've come to the right thread. The final two or three main boilers were connected to the engines at about 7 p.m. that evening, meaning that all 24 double-ended boilers were in service for an estimated speed of 22&frac12; to 23 knots.

If you're interested in the subject I recommend looking at George Behe's excellent book, 'Titanic: Safety, Speed & Sacrifice.'

<FONT COLOR="119911">Or maybe I'm just babbling and have no real idea what I'm talking about . . .

Not at all -- every possibility should always be explored. BTW, welcome to the board. I haven't seen your name before.

Best regards,

Mark.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
James speculated; "Or, if the boilers were already lit, here's a conspiracy theory: Smith ordered the fires in the extra boilers put out, hoping that the authorities in New York (who were certain to find out Titanic had struck ice) wouldn't know that Titanic had been travelling so fast through the ice field."

Hi James, if there was any sort of conspiracy anywhere, shuuting down a few extra boilers would be a pretty useless way of covering it up. There were plenty of people involved in bringing them on line, and others who knew about it, some of whom lived to tell the tale. Also, the fact that the Titanic was going along at high speed was never much of a secret. It was one of the first facts established at the U.S. Senate Inquiry.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Erik Wood

Member
Apr 10, 2001
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The note that Smith wrote has always been something that I have wondered about. It could have been something that has nothing to do with the accident. Something as simple as give me a detailed report of the situation.

Erik
 
Jan 5, 2001
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<FONT COLOR="ff0000">The note that Smith wrote has always been something that I have wondered about. It could have been something that has nothing to do with the accident. Something as simple as give me a detailed report of the situation.

That could be only too true. Personally I think I am heading for something like 'take precautions to prevent boiler explosion in damaged boiler sections, ensure emergency lighting supply is available from auxiliary D-deck dynamos.'

Best regards,

Mark.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Then again, many things fit.
smile.gif


Returning to this topic again, I have been wondering about one specific account from testimony to the American Invesigation:

[hr]
Quote:

ABLE SEAMAN FRANK OLIVER EVANS
Able Seaman Evans testified that soon after the collision, ‘the Fifth or Sixth Officer’ had spoke to him after Evans had ‘went up the ladder there’ to the fore well deck. (About five or ten minutes after collision?). ‘Go down and find the Carpenter and sound all the wells forward, and report to the bridge,’ he had been ordered. He had gone down the Engineers’ alleyway and met the Boatswain.
‘Who are you looking for?’ he had been asked.
‘The Carpenter.’
‘He has gone up.’
‘What is the matter, then?’
‘I do not know. I think we have struck an iceberg.’
He had soon afterwards seen water rising in the forward hatch, rising the tarpaulin.
[hr]​

Now, we have no evidence of Moody going below to find the Carpenter and Lowe was asleep in his cabin. When Fourth Officer Boxhall went below again, he quickly found the Carpenter heading for the bridge, so he would not ask somebody again to go and find the Carpenter. Quartermaster Olliver may be a possibility, but could he be mistaken for an Officer? Additionally, the Carpenter had already gone up when this incident occurred, or at least shortly afterwards. So therefore what sense do we make of this account — any replies * much * appreciated.

Best regards,

Mark.
 

George Behe

Member
Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Mark!

>Now, we have no evidence of Moody going below to >find the Carpenter

Perhaps he didn't. If Moody was on the forward well deck when he spoke with Evans, it occurs to me that Moody might have been there to observe the results of White's lantern-assisted examination of the ship's side. If that was indeed the case, Moody's order to Evans to find the carpenter was probably given without any knowledge of similar orders having been given elsewhere by other officers.

All my best,

George
 
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Max Nikulin

Guest
Just entered the forum after some long
'time -out' ...
How interesting that my post became so long..
And yet how far some posts are from the
first message
happy.gif
)
 

Hitch

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Jan 6, 2006
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I have a question about Thomas Andrews, and I hope I can post it here.

Douse anyone know where Thomas Andrews go to school?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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He was educated at home by a private tutor until the age of 11. Then he attended the Royal Academical Institution, Belfast, where by all accounts he was more interested in sports than book learning. At the age of 16 he left school and began his real education - as an apprentice at Harland & Wolff.
 

david wilson

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Feb 17, 2004
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Bob,royal belfast academical institution,to be politicly correct,locally known as "inst".One of the better grammar schools in the british isles.
regards.
dw.
 
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Lynda Franklin

Guest
What religion was Thomas Andrews I have read that he was unitarian also,I read somewhere that he was presberytrian ,i think ?

[Moderator's note: This message, originally posted to a thread in the Crew Research topic, has been moved to this thread. MAB]
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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The Andrews family were associated with the Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland. As the name suggests, this Church does not demand that its members subscribe to any particular set of doctrines, and many are Unitarians.
 
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Lynda Franklin

Guest
Thanks for the info .I have one last question on Andrews I know he was Thomas Andrews Jr.However,I did not see a middle name for him or his father ,assuming he had one ?