Mrs Daniel Warner Marvin (Mary Graham Carmichael Farquarson)

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Shannon Blank

Guest
Hello all,
This is my first new post as I just found this website last evening ~ I did some research concerning my great-grandmother (Mary Marvin) a few years back but did not find this site at the time, and therefore did not get many answers! She never wanted to discuss what happened (the sinking of the ship) on her honeymoon after being rescued, so much of my research has been via extra-familial sources. If anyone out there (I know there are many, many researchers on this site!) who can give me any and all information you have on Mary Marvin, I would really appreciate it!!!

Thank you,

Shannon Blank
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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The ET data page on Mrs. Marvin now includes a few articles from The New York Times about her, Mr. Marvin, and her second husband, Mr. De Camp.

P.S. Outdated link replaced 29 November 2005.
 
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Shannon Blank

Guest
Hi Mark,

It's been awhile since I have logged in, thanks for the new link and the wonderful info ~
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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A couple online genealogies list Mary Marvin's birthplace as Edinburgh, Scotland. They're definitely referring to the same Mary Graham Carmichael Farquarson Marvin De Camp who was born in 1894 and died in upstate New York in 1975. Her parents are listed as Frank Farquarson and Jessie Carmichael.

Can anyone say if this is true and just what her family was doing in Scotland? In other words, were they Scots who emigrated or were they Americans living in Scotland for some reason? Obviously the family names indicate Scottish descent, and I know that they were Presbyterian.
 

mary mason

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Aug 24, 2003
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Hi Brian.
I realise I am late in replying. It is true that Mary Graham Carmichael Farquharson was born in Scotland. According to her birth registration, Mary was born on 30 January 1894 at 7:30 PM. She was born at 12 Atholl? place, Edinburgh. I can't quite read the exact name, but it looks like Atholl.
Her father Francis Farquharson was born in Aberdeen. He married Jessie Carmichael on 8 August in Burntisland, Fife. According to the 1920 census, Frank and Jessie and Mary immigrated to America in 1903.
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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Thanks for replying Mary.
That's interesting - I wonder what their circumstances were, if they were/became wealthy and all that.
Thanks
 

LeEric Marvin

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Nov 22, 2006
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I am interested in finding the descendants of Daniel Warner Marvin and his wife Mary Graham Carmichael Farquharson Marvin DeCamp. I would like to add this info to my Marvin genealogy database. Daniel's ancestry can be viewed at my site: www.leeric.net
Shannon Blanks and Mr DeCamps email address are no longer any good.
I have gleaned what I can from these posts, but would like more complete info.

Best regards, LeEric Marvin
 
Mar 20, 2007
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http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=940DE7DC1F3BE633A25752C2A9649D946296D6CF

Here is a link to the announcement of Mary Marvin's second marriage, to Horace de Camp, from the Society pages of The New York Times in late 1913.

Interestingly, the same article mentions a stained-glass window, dedicated to the memory of Colonel John Jacob Astor, which Madeleine has had constructed at the Church of the Messiah, near the Astor country estate, in the Hudson River Valley.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Combing through the first-class passenger list for the umpteenth time, I've been struck by the 'home address' supplied by the Marvins when they booked their tickets for their return voyage to the States aboard the Titanic (that is, the address at which they were resident during their sojourn in England).

Unlike the majority of their fellow travellers, who booked themselves in to smart and expensive West End hotels (Harry Anderson and William Sloper at the Waldorf, Lily Bonnell at the Carlton, Albert and Vera Dick at the Cecil, Colonel Gracie, Fred Seward and the Minahan family at the Savoy, J. Hugo Ross at the Ritz), Daniel and Mary apparently put up at 58 Acre Lane in Brixton - certainly not a fashionable or affluent location in 1912 and one which should be approached with caution by tourists today!

Does anybody have any idea why they elected to spend part of their honeymoon in such an unlikely location?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Victorian Brixton had developed as a respectable middle class suburb, and the main thoroughfares like Acre Lane had some quite substantial 3 and 4 story town houses like No 58. By 1912 the area was no longer fashionable and many of the large houses were being subdivided and sublet, but that process of transition still had a long way to go back then. Here's a pic of Acre Lane around the turn of the century.

205247.jpg
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Thanks for sharing that, Bob. Brixton still seems to be a slightly...off-beat...honeymoon destination for a wealthy young couple like the Marvins - but it is not impossible that, given Mary's British roots, they might have been staying with some London-based relatives.

I don't know how Frank Farquharson made his money, following his move State-side earlier in the century, but he was obviously doing sufficiently well by 1910/1911 to allow his debutante daughter to appear in the Society columns of the period press (yachting at Narragansett Pier, for example). By the time of her second wedding, Frank and Jessie were living on Riverside Drive in New York. I believe that this was quite a swanky neighbourhood in 1912 - am I correct?
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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This thread has me feeling guilty, because the Marvins are some of the passengers about whom I've dug up a bunch of info that I've been sitting on for a long time. Not because I wouldn't love to share it, but because I just haven't got round to typing it up (and I've barely been on ET at all this summer).

I may have deprived myself of the opportunity to spill the beans about the crazy kids' secret elopement, but I can enlighten you somewhat about the Farquharson finances. I'm not sure what Frank did, but his wife was a successful businesswoman in her own right. In 1907, she and her sister, Margaret Graham (Mrs William Addison) Wheelock, established the dressmaking business of Farquharson & Wheelock. They must have done quite well. The firm purchased a property at 724 Fifth Avenue in 1911, and in 1920 enlarged the premises by purchasing the Louis P. Hoyt mansion next door for roughly $600,000. The NY Times called this "the highest price ever paid for an inside lot on Fifth Avenue north of Forty-second Street". Shortly afterwards, it was reported that the firm would build a twelve-story building at the site. The Brown, Wheelock Company, Inc was going to be the building's agent, so it was evidently a family affair. In 1928, Jessie Farquharson purchased a duplex apartment at 960 Fifth Avenue, formerly the site of the Clark mansion. The apartment had fourteen rooms, five baths, eleven-foot ceilings, and a private entrance at East 77th Street. She might not have bought it for herself; this was Mary and Horace de Camp's address in the 1941 New York Social Register, while Jessie's 1952 obituary gave her address as 30 West 58th Street. Margaret Wheelock had died eleven days before her sister. Her obituary claimed that she had entered the dressmaking business at the age of 16, when she went to work as a buyer for a London department store.

Riverside Drive was and still is an area of very pricey real estate. And being on Manhattan's West Side, it was and still is an area traditionally favored more by newer moneyed New Yorkers than by the Astor crowd. Last year, I made a list for my own benefit of which New York passengers lived on the West Side as opposed to the East Side:

UPPER WEST SIDE:
Beckwith (“The Wendolyn”￾, 100th St and Riverside, but I believe they were soon to defect to the East Side)
Taussig (777 West End Av), Mandelbaum (200 W 86th St)
Seward (542 West 112th Street)
Straus (West 105th Street, Broadway and West End Avenue)
Rothschild (753 West End Avenue)
Harry Anderson
Harris (Central Park West)
Margaret Hays (304 W 83rd St)
Farquarson (317 Riverside Drive), Marvin (Riverside Drive)
George Rosenshine’s brother ('Ansonia Hotel', probably the Ansonia Apts)
Meyer (158 West Eighty-sixth Street, though Leila was living at 970 Park Ave by 1915)

EAST SIDE:
Astor (840 Fifth Avenue), Force (18 East 37th St)
Cumings (50 E. 64th St)
Greenfield (1239 Madison Avenue)
Karl Behr (777 Madison Avenue)

I would have expected Margaret Hays and Frederick K. Seward to live on the East Side, but the rules aren't set in stone. Plenty of Social Registered New Yorkers, including Daniel Marvin's parents, lived on the West Side (Mary's parents weren't listed; Mary was listed after her second marriage).
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Welcome back, Brian! You've been sorely missed. I hope you've passed a pleasant summer?

Your insight into the state of the Farquharson finances is much appreciated. Coincidentally, I recently learned that Mary's mother was in the fashion business. This nugget of information, wholly new to me, was contained within an unpublished survivor account which I've been granted access to and which I hope to be allowed to share here in full some day (I assure you, it is quite marvellous). Initially, I wondered if there was some confusion with Lady Duff Gordon's Lucile enterprise - so it is fascinating to hear that the survivor in question was, in fact, quite correct when she called Jessie Farquharson a 'top, top dressmaker'.

One thing seems certain - her daughter was not in good financial shape at the time of her death. I recall reading on another thread that Mary left very considerable debts behind her which, once settled, cleared out her estate almost entirely.

If you have not already done so, check out the J. Clinch Smith biographical thread which I started last month. You might care to add to what Carole Lindsay and I have already contributed there.

With warm good wishes

Martin

PS. Any news of Walter and Virginia Clark?
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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Hi Martin - my summer was great. I spent much of it in Vermont, driving a couple of times past the house of Charles Cresson Jones in Bennington and probably past that of the Isham family in Manchester Centre (there are many large white houses on that road, none of which I recognize from the contemporary photo I've seen of the Isham house). I hope you made it out to the Cotswolds?

The state of Mary's finances at the time of her death made an impression on me as well. If I recall correctly, she left behind an estate worth roughly $35,000 and liabilities in the neighborhood of $31,000. I like to think there was some nice big family trust that provided her with a comfortable income but wouldn't have been counted among her personal assets. I'm not clear on when she and Horace de Camp gave up the high life in Manhattan for life in Thendara, New York, a place I had never heard of until I read of Mary living there. I wonder if the move coincided with some financial reversal? They did buy the house of a former president when they moved there (I forget which one). This was apparently a place of some grandeur, but I imagine it wasn't worth nearly as much as 960 Fifth Avenue.

The Clarks - I'm sorry, Martin, I just don't want to risk making another empty promise. Here's what I'll do - I'll open up the file I have of them on my desktop so that it will be staring at me this weekend and making me feel guilty.