Mrs M. Brown and US. Election


Aly Jones

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Dec 15, 2019
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A video on FB, they mentioned Mrs Margaret Brown running for Senate /President of United states of America in 1914 (obviously Mrs brown didn't get in). . I have no idea, if any of this were true or not?
 

Aly Jones

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Dec 15, 2019
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I didn't know she ran for senator and she did so way before women got the right to vote in the US. I thought women had no rights at all in 1900 era but seem women did ok back then. She seemed very modern for her time.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Then 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was passed in 1920 giving women the right to vote.
Apparently they could run for office before that but could not vote.
I would have to check back on this but I think the first woman elected to Congress was some time around 1917.
 

Joe L

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My 2¢…

Jeannette Pickering Rankin (June 11, 1880 – May 18, 1973) was the first woman to hold federal office in the United States. She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1916.
 
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Bo Bowman

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Dec 23, 2019
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I hate people who are sticklers for annoying details of no consequence, but this is my chance to be one! It is my understanding that Mrs. Brown was never called "Molly," and that the nickname was fabricated by either a reporter or the writer of the play about her. As I understand it, "molly" was a derogative term in those days for a hooker or easy woman. Kind of like "broad," and few if any would willingly adopt it as a nickname. Of course, the whole world now knows her as "Molly" Brown.

What is the cumulative wisdom of this group on this? I'd love to hear.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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I got curious and looked it up. Molly was a common nickname for girls named Mary. But it did have other meanings over time. Molly was also a slur used to decribe effimant weak men as in "girly man". First thing that came to my mind was it might have been slang for a "gunman's moll"..you know those bad girls that were the girlfriends of the likes of Dillinger, Machine gun Kelly...ect ect. Whenever the term "Molly" was used around here with my generation it always was slang for Molybdenum. They mine a lot of it around here. Today I guess it means drugs...another slang for homemade drugs like Ecstasy and such. Also means "bitter" in some cases. But from what I found I guess in Australia the term "moll or "molly" means loose woman. I guess Molly Ringwald would be upset to hear that.
 
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Stephen Carey

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Apr 28, 2016
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I hate people who are sticklers for annoying details of no consequence, but this is my chance to be one! It is my understanding that Mrs. Brown was never called "Molly," and that the nickname was fabricated by either a reporter or the writer of the play about her. As I understand it, "molly" was a derogative term in those days for a hooker or easy woman. Kind of like "broad," and few if any would willingly adopt it as a nickname. Of course, the whole world now knows her as "Molly" Brown.

What is the cumulative wisdom of this group on this? I'd love to hear.
I guess the mother /author of this young lady would be disturbed to hear the connotations of her daughter's name!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milly-Molly-Mandy
Milly-Molly-Mandy refers to a series of children's books written and illustrated by Joyce Lankester Brisley, as well as to the main character of those books. Each book has a number of short stories about the little girl in the pink-and-white striped dress.

My sister in law's name is also Mollie and it's quite common amongst the older generation (ie age 70s).

Two countries separated by a common language...
 

Bo Bowman

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Dec 23, 2019
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Stephen Carey stated: "Two countries separated by a common language..."

Truer words were never spoken! Thanks to both Stephen and Steven for the research, history, and feedback!
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Your Welcome. On a side note: I like the name Molly. Never entered my mind that it was used as negative slang. I think its a cool name.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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My 2¢…

Jeannette Pickering Rankin (June 11, 1880 – May 18, 1973) was the first woman to hold federal office in the United States. She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1916.
Thanks for that. She was an interesting person. I've seen her in WW2 documentaries as the only one in congress to vote against declaring war on Japan in 1941. She also voted against the US entering WW1. She was a commited pacifist and stuck to her beliefs. Right or wrong she was her own woman.
 
May 3, 2005
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Thanks to all concerned. (as usual)
Question:
Did she serve continuously at least from 1916 to 1941 ? Re-elected every time ?
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Thanks to all concerned. (as usual)
Question:
Did she serve continuously at least from 1916 to 1941 ? Re-elected every time ?
No she served 2 seperate terms as a representitive in the house. Like Molly Brown she also ran for the US Senate but wasn't elected. She was a republican and also a true liberal progressive for her time. Her main cause was womens rights. From what I just read about her in the link below I admire her. Not so much for her causes and beliefs but because she didn't let people buffalo her. She walked the talk.
 

Bo Bowman

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Dec 23, 2019
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Steven Christian said:
On a side note: I like the name Molly. Never entered my mind that it was used as negative slang. I think its a cool name.

I agree. Neat name. I'd be tickled if one of my great-grandkids (they're arriving with alarming frequency these days) was named Molly. However, it is my understanding that Mrs. J.J. Brown was never called by that name. Not in life, anyway.
 
May 3, 2005
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No she served 2 seperate terms as a representitive in the house. Like Molly Brown she also ran for the US Senate but wasn't elected. She was a republican and also a true liberal progressive for her time. Her main cause was womens rights. From what I just read about her in the link below I admire her. Not so much for her causes and beliefs but because she didn't let people buffalo her. She walked the talk.
I did a further check .
She she was elected in 1916 and served the one term.
Then she dropped out of politics .
Then ran again in 1939 and was again elected and served one term.
She cast her "No" vote for declaration of war in 1917 and cast the only "No" vote in 1941.
 

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