Ms Dorothy Gibson

Jan 5, 2001
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Thanks Randy. Your comments are very kind, but I wouldn't want to detract from Phil and Brian's article. It was brilliant, and quite beyond anything I had imagined.
Regards
Craig
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Well I got my issue and this is all the way in Australia, if it made it here, then the rest of the world must being enjoying their ADB's by now!

I would second Randy's opinion that this issue is especially interesting. I would have had a bit in it too if weren't so lazy!

Anticipation for Phil's article is finally over, and it is WELL worth it! I loved the story on the Gibson ladies and was quite shocked by what those 4 pages revealed.

Craig, I read your article as well, and much enjoyed the info. It's incredible that the name of Mr. and Mrs. D. Edwards was there all this time and most of us never knew that they were parents of the Countess of Rothes!

I barely had any time to give the issue a proper look, but did also read George Behe's piece and was very touched by it.

Daniel.
 
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Simon Donoghue

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This will be my first post, although I have been lurking in the shadows for awhile! <g> The story of Dorothy Gibson has interested me a great deal. What is the ADB this thread discusses, and how may one obtain it? Parenthetically, I have been spending hours at a time just reading on this site, and loving every minute of it.
 
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Brian Hawley

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Simon, welcome to ET! ADB stands for Atlantic Daily Bulletin and is the journal of the acclaimed British Titanic Society. The society is easy to join (and a bargain) just talk to Geoff Whitfield who is a member here at ET and an officer in BTS.

By the way like Phil G. I have yet to get my BTS, while West Coast friends have. The postal service works in odd ways it seems.


Brian in Greenville NC
 
Apr 16, 2001
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I just would like to echo the sentiments here on the wonderful article on Dorothy Gibson by Phil Gowan and Brian Meister. Great work indeed! I must say old Pauline was a tough nut to crack so thanks for your persistence in unraveling their fascinating story.

I would also like to thank Craig Stringer for the equally interesting article on the Countess of Rothes.

Craig, on a personal note, Bob Bracken and I discussed your article last night. Bob always speaks highly of you and frequently mentions the visit you both had years ago. I'll never forget when he returned home from the UK and asked me what I knew about the parents of the Countess. I told him what I could recollect but he shook his head and asked "Did you know they were on the Titanic?" I was very surprised until he showed me the cross channel passenger list that I thought I had looked over thousands of times. Sure enough, the names of her parents were there. He told me that you had told him and that it was not widely known. I'm so glad that you wrote the article about them - it was very detailed and answered a number of questions that both Bob and I still had.

Geoff - congrats to Brian, Steve and you on yet another fine issue of the ADB. It is always a pleasure to read.

Regards to all,

Mike Findlay
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Randy, that's too gorgeous! I think the 'Sun God' himself (who once suffered from sunstroke in South America) would be highly entertained. I saw a reference to the Conway Memorial Cup in the last issue and thought it would be of interest to readers to hear the full story, including the latest Conway-Moody memorial.

There are a lot of good pieces in this story - including more on John Coffey (serial deserter - so much for any shreds of the 'premonition' story still left after the sterling research that has been done on him in recent years).
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I just got my ADB in the snail mail today. Great as always. I haven't had a chance to read through the article on Dorothy Gibson, but I'm lookingforward to it. I had time during break to read through that peice on John Coffey though. Apparently, desertion was something of a habit with him. I got quite a chuckle out of it.

Looking forward to more!
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Thank you to everyone for the compliments regarding my Dyer Edwardes article. I would like to point out one detail. In the article Clementina's maiden name is given as villagers, when it was in fact Villiers - a gremlin got into the works somewhere. Again, many thanks.
Craig
 

Phillip Gowan

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Apr 10, 2001
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Craig,
I too was stunned to find that the Countess's parents were cross-channel passengers. Very interesting article. Thanks for your kind comments as well. I'm at work and don't have all the documents with me, but wasn't Mary D. Hewlett's mother's maiden name Villiers as well? That's a very rare name over here--wonder if there's a connection? From what I know of the Hewlett clan, though, they fell far down the ladder in stature from the Edwardes family. We recently found a good photo of Mary Hewlett--looks to be in her 20's, a somewhat plain, thin young woman with what looks to be blonde or sandy hair.

Again, great article--the Edwardes Titanic connection was one of those O. Henry type "surprises around every corner."

Phil
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Thank you, Phil. Your compliments are warmly recieved, especially as I, like many others, hold your work in high regard. I have never come across any connection between Clementina Edwardes and Mary Hewlett, although, even here, it is an uncommon name. Interestingly, Clementina's family had fallen far by the time of her birth, and the Melfort Earldom, to which she was connected is now extinct, and was so before 1912.
Thanks again
Craig
 
May 8, 2001
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The torture is finally over! The A.D.B. was delivered today. Fantastic articles, and I am humbled that my name made it into a small place inside this great magazine!

I was so engrossed with the outcome of the Gibson story I looked up at the end to see two family members standing nearby, waiting for an answer to a question I did not hear them make. Great piece of detective work Phil and Brian!

Craig and Inger, I enjoyed your writings as well!

Keep up the great work!
 

Inger Sheil

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Very nice, Randy! Is that from a pc, or mag? Rather flattering, but if you look v-e-r-y carefully you can almost see Dorothy in there. As an aside, wasn't that a fantastic selection of portraits in the Gowan/Meister Gallery? The full range from quite flattering to very harsh! Certainly gives you a feel for her appearance as an older woman.
 
May 12, 2005
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Ing,

It's a print with a reproduction signature and publisher's stamp - I would guess it was originally a magazine or newspaper insert or supplement. I own three Harrison Fisher prints of recognizable "Dots" - to me this one is actually a very good likeness. Her nose is pared down in all of Fisher's renderings by the way. Also, this is a scan from the eBay seller I bought it from (I haven't scanned it myself yet). Yes the photos of Dorothy that Phil has shared are amazing -as are all of them. I was really amused by the images of Mrs. Lines - she looked like Whistler's Mother!

Randy
 

Inger Sheil

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Sounds like a nice find, Randy. Can't imagine that good inserts like that with images by a well-recognised graphic artist are all that common? BTW - do you still have the address for that dealer whose stall we spent so long with at Hampstead Heath? I have a vague recollection it was in Hendon, and wanted to go have a look at his stock sometime in the near future.

How many different Harrison Fisher images of Gibson have you come across? How prolific was he? My only acqaintance with his work is via ebay postcards!
 
May 12, 2005
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I missed this so please excuse the very late response, Inger. I am up writing my eyes out at home after a computer crash at work suspended our productivity today (yes reporters work weekends!)But I must take a "smoke" break - again! - and ET is usually the safest place to go on the net at this hour!

As to Harrison Fisher's popularity, he was tremendously so, almost as well-known - and certainly as active - as Charles Dana Gibson. Fisher's lovely ladies were adored in romantic novels for which he provided the illustrations, on women's magazine covers (most notably "Cosmopolitan" Mag)as well as in the ubiquitous picture postcards so beloved of Edwardians.

Gibson is sometimes hard to recognize in his illustrations; she seems to have been his favorite around 1910-11 to judge from the dress styles but some date to slightly earlier. I have come across at least six illustrations that are unmistakably Gibson and three or four that seem an amalgam of Gibson and another model whose name escapes me at the moment.

Below is a Fisher picture of Gibson entitled "Ready and Waiting." I believe this was used as a "Cosmo" cover but I have yet to confirm that.

84314.jpg
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Lovely image! I wouldn't have realised it was her at a casual glance, although once you've made the identification I can see the idealised features.

That's almost the sort of neck that Rossetti might have given his models...!