Mummy

George Behe

Member
Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Elizabeth!

The mummy story was just a legend concocted shortly after the sinking. The tale was extant as early as 1914, and in later years Egyptologist Margaret Murray claimed to have fabricated the original story as a joke on a 'woman scientist' of her acquaintance. (The 'woman scientist' obviously repeated the story once or twice later on.) :)

All my best,

George
 
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Katia

Guest
Hi Elizabeth!

Some people say that a mummy of an ancient princess was onboard the Titanic and that's one of the several possibilities to her sink. People believe that this mummy was bad because a man died hours after taken some photographs of it and the onwer has strangely died after buy it.
The mummy was then bought by a museum and some other guy buit it to the museum. SOme people believe that the mummy was being transported to the States by the Titanic.

(If anyone wants to know there's also a story about Old Tommy who was told he died during the construction of the ship. The tail says that two guys heard him while they were looking around the Titanic before she sailed. These two guys never talked about it till the night of the sinking while they where talking to a friend of them. This third man explained that it should be "Old Tommy" who had died and he also said that other people had listen to him. If it is true or not I don't know but some people also thinks that Old Tommy took Titanic and some of her passengers and crew because Titanic took his life!)

and this is all I know!

Hope I helped!
Katia
 

Lou Kerr

Member
Feb 6, 2010
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Does anyone think this story has any connection to the crates of Egyptian antiquities belonging to Molly Brown?
 

Remco Hillen

Member
Jan 6, 2001
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First of, i can be short in the story of the mummy, There was no mummy aboard.

About that Old Tommie tail, that story was being told, a employee of HW was captured in the double sides of Titanic, and left there.
Not true, because Titanic didn't had double sides....only a double bottom.

Remco:)
 
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Katia

Guest
Once again, Hi Remco!

Like I probably said the thing about Old Tommie may only be a tail, trying to explain what people of the time didn't understand: why a such great, beautifull and big ship went down, but the story that you're talking about is about other two man who were left on another ship, not the Titanic. "Old Tommie" supposdly died because some boards fell down on him and so he died; but his bodie (if the story is true!!!) was found and people knew about what happened to him!). The story you were talking about was about 2 men who were building another ship in England I believe (I don't remember the name of the ship) and were captured in the double sides of the ship. Anyway, they dissaperead and they're bodies were only found many years later when the boat (after many disasters with no reason) was being destroyed.

Sorry about the english!!!!
:eek:)Kátia
 
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Tracey McIntire

Guest
Hi! I understood that the story of the mummy on Titanic originated from a story that W.T. Stead had told to a group at dinner one night about a mummy in the British Museum. As you may know, Stead was quite a believer in ESP and the supernatural. After Stead died in the sinking, the story was repeated incorrectly, saying that the mummy had actually been on board Titanic. This seems to make the most sense, as we all know how distorted stories can become the more they are repeated.
 
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Todd C. Riniolo

Guest
Does anyone have any information on William Stead, who may have been the first to publish an article on the 'unlucky mummy' held in the British Museum? I know Stead used to edit 'Borderland', which was a periodical devoted to the paranormal. I have been searching for the first published account of the 'unlucky mummy.' Thanks for the help...
 
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Jessica Cullimore

Guest
Todd,

William Thomas Stead was a journalist and a first class passenger on the Titanic. Incidentally, Stead was on his way to the US to address a Peace Conference. He had written not only a story about a liner sunk by ice, but also told of how passengers aboard a sinking ship were unable to be saved due to a lack of lifeboats. Stead was also said to be a believer in mysticism and spiritualism. I guess nowadays he would be called a "ghost chaser".

In 1886 he wrote a fictional articles for the Pall Mall Gazette in which he describd a ship's loss through collision with another ship; great loss of life was suffered because there were not enough lifeboats.

In 1892 he wrote an article for the Review of Reviews entitled "From The Old World To The New" depicting a fictious journey aboard White Star Line's Majestic. Majestic had to stop mid journey to rescue people from a ship which had sunk after it had collided with an ice field. (NB: The Majestic had once been captained by the same man that led Titanic to her fate...)

During the few years before the Titanic disaster, Stead had been advised to steer well clear of ocean travel. He once even gave a talk about he himself being involved in a shipwreck and calling out for help.

On the second or third evening out Fred Seward recalled Stead speaking at dinner about a cursed mummy. The mummy in question - actually the inner coffin cover for the priestess Amen-Ra - was an exhibit at the British Museum, London.

Seward spoke in a 19 April interview with a New York World journalist about Stead's story. During the aftermath, the story of the cursed mummy was exaggerated and people came to believe that the curse was that of a real mummy aboard Titanic. Allegedly, the real mummy on board Titanic' wealthy owner paid bribes to have the case placed in a lifeboat and then taken aboard Carpathia. Finally it was secretly landed at New York. Its presence in the American's collection caused such devastation that it was returned to England. The case was taken to Canada where on 28 May 1914 it was placed aboard the Empress of India...

Neither administrators nor trustees of the British Museum are empowered to sell or trade items from its collection to private individuals, no matter what their wealth or social status.

The whole tale is said to be one of fabrication caused by the disaster's deep emotional impact. It was only given credibility in the start because it came from Stead.

A mummy case in whose painted eyes there is a look of anguish still exists, still owned by the British Museum. It's number: 22542...

I hope this helps you!
It's taken me ages to type out that story!
Jessica Cullimore, 15, Cornwall, England
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Jessica Cullimore

Guest
By the way, in case you were wondering, The Empress of India sunk....

Hmmmm...
Interesting...

Jessica Cullimore
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Jessica Cullimore

Guest
Actually, I just remembered something else about the mummy. It was rescued from the Empress Of India and the owner then decided to return it to Egypt on a third ship, the Lusitania, which was torpedoed by a German submarine. Presumably it's now at the bottom of the sea somewhere...

Jessica
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Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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Actually it was Empress of Ireland. The mummy's last known act of revenge was to kill Walter Schwieger, who sank Lusitania, thus preventing the mummy ever returning to Egypt.

Those diving on Lusitania are issued with shamrocks, rabbits' feet and St Christopher medals by the Irish government when they leave Cobh.
 
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Bev Kennedy

Guest
Archive through April 20 2005

I have heard of a legend where a private American collector purchased an Egyptian Mummy that was supposedly cursed. Previous owners were subjected to mysterious fates, however this new owner was a sceptic & planned to travel with his new aquisition back home aboard The Titanic. Madame Blavatsky, the famed spiritualist & pshycic upon viewing the sarcophagus declared it to be pure evil & refused to stay in the same room. Does anyone know if this is pure fabrication or if indeed there is an element of truth regarding this fascinating tale. I'd be happy to discuss. Please E-Mail me if you have any relevant info. Regards, Bev.
 
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Tracey McIntire

Guest
Hi Bev!
This is a total falsehood. If you check in the "Closed Threads" section of this message board, towards the bottom there is a discussion labelled "Mummy." See my response at the end.
Sincerely,
Tracey
 
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Pete Cabbage

Guest
I heard that this story is related to an interview given by a survivor after the ship sank.

The passenger related a story about this particular Mummy he'd heard while traveling on the ship. The journalist decided to 'spice up' his story a little bit by writing that the Mummy actually caused the accident...

This laid the seed of this ENTIRELY FICTIONAL story in the public imagination. Ever since that day, this rumour has followed the Titanic story around like a like a bad smell...

One last word, I heard that the British Natural History Museum still has the Mummy in question in it's vaults somewhere. I don't know whether this is true or not...
 
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Paige

Guest
I belive I read about the mummy in ANTR by Walter Lord.According to him Egyptian records show that mummy was travelling on a ship ,to New York in April of 1912.For whatever that is worth.
 

Dave

Member
Mar 17, 2010
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This story seems to be one of the most enduring
and captivating legends around. Supposedly the
Princess of Amen-Ra lived some 1,500 years before Christ.

I have been told, by Titanic authorities, that the Princess and her connection with the Titanic are pure fiction which can be read in detail at

http://www.snopes.com/horrors/ghosts/mummy.htm
 

Thomas Ford

Member
Jun 22, 2010
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if the mummy was on board and william stead did know about it like the story says it fits why he is seen reading calmly in the smoking room like he knew it would happen,i also heard it was saved from the titanic only to be sent home on the lusitania,which i doubt it was even saved from the titanic if it was onboard,alot don't believe in the mummy story,i'm not sure if it is real but onboard carpathia passengers and crew started about the mummy and surely myths have to start somewhere.