Murder on The Titanic


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michael taylor

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Anyone ever read this book? It's not bad but before you go out and get it it's a mystery set on the Titanic so it's not too big on history. Might be worth looking at if you like that kind of story
 
Oct 15, 2004
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I have read 2 different books of simliar titles... the better of the 2, "The Titanic Murders" by Max Allan Collins, (Published by Berkley Prime Crime, 1999), used only actual characters who were aboard. The protagonist is Jacques ("Jack") Futrelle, a real-life detective novelist who was one of the vessel's casualties... the victims and killer were also real passengers choicen for their parts because nobody ever came forward to claim or inquire about them.
 
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Jun 4, 2000
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Michael,
As Richard wrote there's a couple of novels with similar titles, but I take it you're referring to Jim Walker's Murder on the Titanic.

I have read it, and I can't say it's my cup of tea although I enjoy a good mystery as much as anyone. I thought the writing poor and the book in dire need of an editor. The history wasn't much chop either, but a good writer can literally get away with murder. Sadly I don't think Walker a good writer.
 

Gary.J Bell

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May 30, 2004
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Hey all
I bought this book about 2 years ago, i wasnt looking for it,and had never heard of it before, but it is excellent.
Heres what it sayes on the back:

THERES A KILLER ABOARD THE MOST FAMOUS SHIP IN HISTORY. WILL HE FIND MORGAN FAIRFIELD BEFORE THE TITANIC STRIKES THE FATAL ICEBERG
A man lies dying in the street and Morgan Fairfield is compelled to deliver the mans important message to the American War Department.
Morgan is given only two things, a locked briefcase and a first class ticket aboard the Titanic.
The suspense is more chilling than the icy waters of the north atlantic as Morgan tries to save his precious cargo, his wavering faith and his own endangered life all aboard the ship destined for disaster.

Its a really great book, well written, and quite acurate with facts concerning the Titanic herself.
 
Jun 4, 2000
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Gary,
I've moved your post to this thread discussing Jim Walker's book. Please do not start duplicate threads.
 
Jun 4, 2000
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S'Ok. Next time, take a quick squiz at the list of topics. This thread was only a few topics down the page.
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

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I'm currently in the middle of this one now. Its a pretty gripping adventure, lots of characters and action, with the love story in the background. I do, however, see frequent hawkings back to JC's Titanic film. When JJ Astor meets Morgan Fairfield, narrowing his eyes and saying..."are you of the Fairfields of Newport?"; or in the prologue, Morgan in the water felt like "a thousand knives were being jabbed into his body"; or in the gymnasium, when Gloria Thompson is speaking with Margaret Hastings and asks about her fiance, "Do you love him?" And then repeats the question, similar to Jack and Rose on deck when he asks her if she's in love with Cal. But all in all, its a good read. I am anxious to see how it ends.
 
May 9, 2006
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I've just recently re-read the book and have to say I share Fiona's assessment. It's not very well written and would have needed some rigorous proof-reading.

Moreover, it is not, as Gary says, 'quite accurate with facts'. Admittedly, the author has read something about the Titanic, but I got the impression his reading was very selective and next to correct details, he makes enormous mistakes. For example, he does mention the near collision with the New York, but he describes the scene as if Boxhall was in command of the ship, with Captain Smith and Lightoller looking on in admiration.

What I absolutely don't understand is that Walker claims in the introduction that Kitty Webb was the mistress of Benjamin Guggenheim and a historical character. I can understand that fictional characters are introduced because the story-line requires them, but to pretend they were historical figures is beyond me.
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Monika! After all these years, you've finally registered on ET! Delighted to see you here, old friend (and I owe you an email - I just got back from the UK, and am planning on writing an epic to you).

I'm going to have to revisit this book, if only to read the Boxhall-Saves-The-Day passage. That sounds sublime.

Nearly as good as pinning murders on poor Crafton.
 
May 9, 2006
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Hi Ing, thanks for the welcome. I was thinking that you'd probably still be on holiday.

There are, by the by, quite a few 'Boxhall would have saved the day if they'd only let him' passages in the book. He's definitely Walker's favourite Officer. Of the others, only Lightoller and Murdoch make a regular appearance. Moody and Wilde get very briefly mentioned in the last bit. - Oh, and there is an unnamed Officer who pulls a ten-year-old boy out of a lifeboat because 'in his book' he's a man.

I started making a list with all the mistakes but gave up after a while because there were just too many.

Anyway, looking forward to your epic e-mail!
 
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