My painting of the Lusitania


Codus Lionel

Member
Oct 11, 2006
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Marseille " FRANCE "
Hi Everybody,

I post My Painting of the lusitania No Finishes.

Kind Regards.

photo_193_copy1.jpg


http://planlusi.aceblog.fr/
 

Eric Longo

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Aug 13, 2004
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Hello Lionel,
You may wish to alter the funnel colors in the final layers - Cunard funnels were not a vermillion red but a light orange. Testors orange provides a fairly good match in terms of color.
What medium are you using? It looks like an opaque water based medium. Look forward to seeing it finished.

Good luck,
Eric Longo
 

Eric Longo

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Aug 13, 2004
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Hi cmdrsam,

I should have just said "orange" - I used the word "light" in contrast to the strong red depicted in Lionel's under painting.
The color was indeed an orange to the best of my knowledge. It has been compared to the color of a basketball — Testors International Orange is said to be a very good match.
A well-researched article at Eric Sauder's comprehensive site Northatlancticrun.com discusses her funnel colors during the war, and it is noted that "Cunard red" is actually orange.
If you look at Ken Marschall's website the print of her there clearly shows her funnels painted orange. All the paintings he did of her that illustrate Exploring the Lusitania also have orange funnels, as does his depiction of her sister Mauretania in his Art of Titanic. I am sure you know his reputation for accuracy.
I have also seen unfaded 35MM color slides of Aquitania in white and her funnels were orange as well; a Google search yields at least one color slide of her with the orange visible. I have seen other color slides of her with much darker funnels but those were taken close to her demise, so 1949-50.
My interest is limited to Mauretania, and Lusitania to a degree, so I have no idea when or why this color may have been changed. Wasn't John Maxtone-Graham famous for his "Cunard orange" sox?

Best,
Eric Longo
 

Codus Lionel

Member
Oct 11, 2006
123
3
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Marseille " FRANCE "
Hi Eric Longo and Samuel Halpern,

Thank you for your comment I not to arrive not have to carry out the exact color.

I succeeded with can close carrying out the color of the funnels. I

post my new version.

My new version is not finishes.

100_2166.jpg
 

Eric Longo

Member
Aug 13, 2004
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Hi Lionel,
That is a much closer color - your painting is coming along nicely. I realized there are some color slides of Aquitania C. 1948 with "Cunard orange" - posted right here at ET! I believe the color was actually a bit lighter than shown in these slides - the beautiful image of the Boat Deck seems rather high in contrast, but you get the idea of the color.

Link to Aquitania Color Photographs thread

Best,
Eric Longo
 
Feb 7, 2005
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Very nice painting of the Lusitania, Lionel! Thanks for posting what you've done so far. I hope you'll continue to let us see the progress you make on this study of "Lusy".

I would tend to agree with Eric that your most recent attempt at "Cunard Red" is the most accurate, although I would say that it may need a touch more red. Of course, that may depend on the time of day you've placed Lusitania in your painting--whether sunrise, sunset, or something in between.

Cunard's unique funnel color is a bit difficult to duplicate exactly. Not impossible, but it does take some trial and error to get it right. I think what you have in your painting now is very close. You're doing a great job--keep up the good work!

Denise
 
Mar 22, 2003
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www.titanicology.com
Eric and Codus:

Apparently Cunard's funnel colors had undergone some evolution. I am correct about the colors I've seen on the QM and QE during the late 50s and early 60s. Definitely more reddish than orangy. I found the following explanation concerning the funnel color history of Cunard to be very interesting:


The "Cunard Red" color has an interesting history. In the 1830s, Robert Napier, a British shipping engineer who improved and developed the steamships that would become the first of the Cunard line, was faced with a dilemma. The heat in the smokestacks reached such high temperatures that conventional paints of the day would bubble and peal off. The painters developed a clever solution. A mixture of bright ochre and buttermilk was applied. With the heat of the smokestacks, the paint mixture literally "cooked" onto the stacks and stayed put. The resulting orange/red color, accented with a broad black band at the top of each stack and black lines on the flanges, was to become Napier's trademark and, later, the identifying mark of all Cunard liners. The tradition remained, even though paint manufacturers had discovered a way to delete the buttermilk from the formula long before the Queen Mary was launched!

An excellent source for colors to use on a model or painting, actually showing examples of them, is the fine article by J. Kent Layton which can be accessed here: titanic-model com/articles/lusi_tutoria/LUSITANIA_Tutorial_Revised.pdf. It also talks about the evolution of Cunard's Orange/Red funnel colors.

Cheers,
 

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Feb 7, 2005
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THANKS, Sam, for finding that passage on the evolution of "Cunard Red"! I knew that I'd read somewhere that they put buttermilk into the red paint, but for the life of me I couldn't remember where! I went to bed last night trying to remember which book I'd seen that in...I woke up this morning and started looking through a few before giving up. I didn't want to post something about buttermilk in paint without having a cite for it!

Thanks!

Denise
 

Codus Lionel

Member
Oct 11, 2006
123
3
123
Marseille " FRANCE "
Hi Everybody,

For my painting of the lusitania I was useful myself of paintings of Ken Marschall.

Is it is fatty with these paintings that I arrived at can close with the good color I must carry it out with one can of red and the yellow.

Kind Regards.
 
J

João Carlos Pereira Martins

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I'm glad to see that your interest on Lusitania led you to do such a nice work, Lionel! Congratulations.

Regards, João
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Good work, Lionel!

Dont know if you've seen this one or not, but here is an excellent view of the stern from which you can gather details.
113738.jpg
 
J

João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
You're welcome, Lionel! You can treat me by João, of course...

João
 

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