Mystery ship candidates


Seumas

Member
Mar 25, 2019
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Glasgow, Scotland
Can you point me to this, Seamas?

A vertical buckle on the hull below C Deck suggests damage incurred due to a longitudinal bending moment...e.g....what's known as "hogging" .the bow hitting the sea bed first ... digging in then the rest, slowly settling onto the sea bed This would but the upper decks C, D and E in tension, and the lower decks in compression. Add to this a bulging outward force due to sea bed resistance and you have a recipe for side door failures. However, I would suspect the doors would simply spring but remain in situ.
Sure thing.

Scroll three quarters of the way down until you come to the pic of the gangway door on the wreck. You'll find the relevant bit there. Here's the address again in case you need it - http://www.paullee.com/titanic/belowdecks.php

I'm not going to quote the whole article because I have a great a dislike of people who copy and paste entire articles (complete with graphics) and put them in ET posts. It's not the done thing in my opinion.
 

Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
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Maryland, USA
Can you point me to this, Seamas?

A vertical buckle on the hull below C Deck suggests damage incurred due to a longitudinal bending moment...e.g....what's known as "hogging" .the bow hitting the sea bed first ... digging in then the rest, slowly settling onto the sea bed This would but the upper decks C, D and E in tension, and the lower decks in compression. Add to this a bulging outward force due to sea bed resistance and you have a recipe for side door failures. However, I would suspect the doors would simply spring but remain in situ.
I have trouble seeing any buckle

Portside Mosaic (zoomed in) RMST Inc 2010
1619543229351.png


(I forget the documentary name and year, but its from the 1990s)
D-Deck Gangway door.jpg
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,397
1,673
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Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
Hi Sam, I hope you're well!

I have a question for you,
say your ship struck a rock or so, and began to sink. You were in command of a passenger liner. You are boarding the lifeboats.
You see a ship, just faintly, by your estimates, maybe 10 miles away.
They are not responding to the distress rockets

Would you send your passengers to row over to that vessel and have her come at once to your ship?
What I would do is simple, knowing that my vessel will not stay afloat for very long. I would see to it that as many of the boats were filled up and have them keep close together and wait for known rescue vessels to arrive. I wouldn't waist my time or resources on a vessel that was apparently ignoring my distress signals. Smith knew help was coming, and it would be hours before they arrived. The only priority should have been to save as many lives as possible by filling the boats and making sure that lamps were in them so that they could be seen in the dark. The smartest one was Boxhall who put those flares into his boat before he left.
 
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Arun Vajpey

Member
Jul 8, 1999
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Go just over half way down the page below and read the lengthy section entitled "The Disappearing Boatswain". I think you will find it deeply interesting and Dr Lee explains his reasoning in painstaking detail, provides helpful graphics and provides a source at every step:
I think Brad Payne also has done a good article about the supposed fate of Bo'sun Alfred Nichols and his men. I also believe that it is a myth they Nichols and his 6 men (whose identities only Nichols could have known) died trying to open a gangway door on D-deck. The actual point is that after Lightoller gave the order to Nichols at 01:05 am, the two men did not meet again and since the Second Officer did not know the identities of the 6 men who went down with Nichols, he could not have been any wiser if one or more of them had passed him in the next hour and a bit.

I believe that Nichols decided that it was not practical to use gangway doors for loading lifeboats and returned to the boat deck but by then Lightoller had gone down to A-deck for his shenanigans with Lifeboat #4. By then the boat deck was getting more and more crowded and so it was easy for the two men to miss each other. I believe that Nichols gave James Johnstone that 'star tip. after he returned to the boat deck and at around 01:30 am. Also Fireman Fred Barrett reported meeting Nichols as he arrived in the vicinity of Lifeboat #13 at almost 01:40 am. Barrett said that Nichols told him to get into the bat and 'pull an oar'.
 
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Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
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Maryland, USA
You would have a problem seeing it on that scale, Cam. you would need to be well back from the target.
I understand, although the best I could do would to show a picture of the baseboard of the Gangway in 1986, and I doubt that's what we need.

We can't exactly say where Dr. Lee saw the buckle, he only provided the picture that I sent earlier
1619553504432.png
 

Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
1,912
340
148
16
Maryland, USA
Sure thing.

Scroll three quarters of the way down until you come to the pic of the gangway door on the wreck. You'll find the relevant bit there. Here's the address again in case you need it - http://www.paullee.com/titanic/belowdecks.php

I'm not going to quote the whole article because I have a great a dislike of people who copy and paste entire articles (complete with graphics) and put them in ET posts. It's not the done thing in my opinion.
I've actually already read this twice, just remembered.
 

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