Mystery ship candidates

Arun Vajpey

Member
Go just over half way down the page below and read the lengthy section entitled "The Disappearing Boatswain". I think you will find it deeply interesting and Dr Lee explains his reasoning in painstaking detail, provides helpful graphics and provides a source at every step:
I think Brad Payne also has done a good article about the supposed fate of Bo'sun Alfred Nichols and his men. I also believe that it is a myth they Nichols and his 6 men (whose identities only Nichols could have known) died trying to open a gangway door on D-deck. The actual point is that after Lightoller gave the order to Nichols at 01:05 am, the two men did not meet again and since the Second Officer did not know the identities of the 6 men who went down with Nichols, he could not have been any wiser if one or more of them had passed him in the next hour and a bit.

I believe that Nichols decided that it was not practical to use gangway doors for loading lifeboats and returned to the boat deck but by then Lightoller had gone down to A-deck for his shenanigans with Lifeboat #4. By then the boat deck was getting more and more crowded and so it was easy for the two men to miss each other. I believe that Nichols gave James Johnstone that 'star tip. after he returned to the boat deck and at around 01:30 am. Also Fireman Fred Barrett reported meeting Nichols as he arrived in the vicinity of Lifeboat #13 at almost 01:40 am. Barrett said that Nichols told him to get into the bat and 'pull an oar'.
 
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You would have a problem seeing it on that scale, Cam. you would need to be well back from the target.
I understand, although the best I could do would to show a picture of the baseboard of the Gangway in 1986, and I doubt that's what we need.

We can't exactly say where Dr. Lee saw the buckle, he only provided the picture that I sent earlier
1619553504432.png
 
Sure thing.

Scroll three quarters of the way down until you come to the pic of the gangway door on the wreck. You'll find the relevant bit there. Here's the address again in case you need it - http://www.paullee.com/titanic/belowdecks.php

I'm not going to quote the whole article because I have a great a dislike of people who copy and paste entire articles (complete with graphics) and put them in ET posts. It's not the done thing in my opinion.
I've actually already read this twice, just remembered.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Look at the available evidence without blinkers, you will see that there were at least 7 mystery ships in the area between 11-30 pm and 3-30 am the next morning.
1. Boxhall's moving ship.
2. Rostron's west-bound ship.
3. Lord's nearby ship which Stone claimed sailed away
4. Groves' twin steaming light ship which disappeared 10 minutes after Lord's nearby ship stopped.
5. Stewart's yellow funnel ship which stopped against the ice to the southward.
6. Moore's southward sailing sailing ship.
7. Moore's small cargo ship which crossed his bow heading SE. ward.

However, note that there were no moving ships on the eastern side of the ice barrier that night and only two of the above list were too late on the scene to be contenders. There was another contender, but you can all do the ground work yourselves or buy my book if it ever gets printed.
 
Look at the available evidence without blinkers, you will see that there were at least 7 mystery ships in the area between 11-30 pm and 3-30 am the next morning.
1. Boxhall's moving ship.
2. Rostron's west-bound ship.
3. Lord's nearby ship which Stone claimed sailed away
4. Groves' twin steaming light ship which disappeared 10 minutes after Lord's nearby ship stopped.
5. Stewart's yellow funnel ship which stopped against the ice to the southward.
6. Moore's southward sailing sailing ship.
7. Moore's small cargo ship which crossed his bow heading SE. ward.

However, note that there were no moving ships on the eastern side of the ice barrier that night and only two of the above list were too late on the scene to be contenders. There was another contender, but you can all do the ground work yourselves or buy my book if it ever gets printed.
Your only 109 years too late Jim. In early 1913, Albert Moulton Foweraker published an analysis of the Californian affair based on his own research into the reported events, and his personal correspondence with Captain Stanley Lord. Foweraker believed there were seven mystery ships about, not counting the Californian, Titanic, Carpathia, Mount Temple, Frankfurt and Almerian that he had identified on his chart.
 
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Jim Currie

Member
Your only 109 years too late Jim. In early 1913, Albert Moulton Foweraker published an analysis of the Californian affair based on his own research into the reported events, and his personal correspondence with Captain Stanley Lord. Foweraker believed there were seven mystery ships about, not counting the Californian, Titanic, Carpathia, Mount Temple, Frankfurt and Almerian that he had identified on his chart.
You are never too late or too old to learn. Sam... Happy New Year! ;)
 
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One time I heared in a documentary that the light on the horizen was a ilegel seal fishing ship that did not go to titanics aid due to there illegal fishing...what has humanity come to?
 

Seumas

Member
One time I heared in a documentary that the light on the horizen was a ilegel seal fishing ship that did not go to titanics aid due to there illegal fishing...what has humanity come to?
That story was proven to be completely untrue decades ago.

The ship in question was called the Samson but it can be proved that she was tied up in Iceland at the time of the Titanic's sinking.

If you want to learn more, Paul Lee and Sam Halpern have written excellent books that explain everything and destroy a lot of myths in the process.
 
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