Names for the Olympicclass


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Eloise Aston

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Apologies if this has already been asked, but I couldn't find it if it has!

Who came up with the names for the Olympic-class (without getting into the whole Britannic/Gigantic debate which I know is covered elsewhere)? Was it Ismay as the films suggest? I thought it was but can't find anything one way or the other. Seems likely at any rate, but can anyone point me in the right direction? Thanks.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Who came up with the names for the Olympic-class <<

It was likely a matter of some quiet boardroom debate but as I understand it, it was Ismay who made the final decision. This isn't really something a lot of histories have paid attention to.
 

Eloise Aston

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Thanks; that makes sense. Seems a little odd to me that there isn't more on it, given the apparent fuss afterwards over them being supposedly 'hubristic' names and the whole Britannic thing. I'd have thought there'd be some interesting stuff on whose 'fault' it was, unless everyone just assumed it was Ismay, which seems logical.
 
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>>Seems a little odd to me that there isn't more on it,<<

I doubt it was considered that big of a deal at the time. A stenographer might have recorded the minutes of some of the meetings but if so, any such record is long lost.

>>...given the apparent fuss afterwards over them being supposedly 'hubristic' names and the whole Britannic thing.<<

A fuss which arose ex post facto to the accident itself when people were trying to find some sort of deeper and even metephysical meaning to it all. Take a look at the press of the time and you'll see editors, politicians, and clergy enthusiastically jumping on to that bandwagon. (They still do.) It ignores the far more mundane reality that the loss of the Titanic was due to the reckless seamanship of the day which finally came home to bite.

Had the Titanic missed her encounter with the iceberg, nobody would have bothered looking for any meanings behind the names.
 

Eloise Aston

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Oh, I see what you mean - I thought you were referring to more modern histories, and was wondering why they hadn't looked at the fuss which sprang up about the names. As you say, everyone seems to have jumped on that bandwagon (entirely ignoring the fact that Olympic never seems to have incurred any 'divine wrath' for daring to have such a name) and I thought it would be an interesting things for historians now to look at - social/press attitudes etc.
 

Mark Baber

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Olympic never seems to have incurred any 'divine wrath'

The reason for that, Eloise, is explained here.

;-)
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>...and I thought it would be an interesting things for historians now to look at - social/press attitudes etc<<

Oh they do. Especially those historians who focus on the sort of coverage the media gave to the event. What a lot of people were saying at the time often had little to do with reality, but they were saying it and the press was all too happy to lap it up.
 

Eloise Aston

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Haha, good one Mark! Even among that lot, Poseidon was unusually touchy and could really hold a grudge. If Titanic had been a ship in Greek mythology, I'd definitely believe the gods sank her.
Maybe White Star Line didn't perform the necessary sacrifices before Titanic sailed - so hard to get the animals these days...
 
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>>so hard to get the animals these days...<<

We can always start scratching around for virgins to feed to the nearest Volcano.
evil.gif
 

Eloise Aston

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Why a volcano? Shouldn't we tie them to icebergs? Or sea monsters are always popular (perhaps not with the aforesaid virgins though).
 
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