LLWH

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Sep 14, 2021
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Hello! I'm in the research stage of a novel (time travel, should be fun!) and was hoping to find out some practical details of what life on the Titanic would have been like for a personal maid of a first class lady. I've seen on here that they ate in the maid & valet saloon and (if they were looking after their employer) slept in cramped, less desirable rooms on the interior, possibly shared with other maids/servants.

Does anyone know of more details than that? What the rooms were like? Whether they were single or double berths? Where were they, how far away from the first class staterooms? What kinds of things were on the menu for them? Practical things, like access to certain areas of the ship and expectations of them? What they wore? And I have so many silly questions, like how they knew when to go help their mistresses with whatever they needed if they weren't allowed in the first class areas during the day and slept probably a decent distance away from them? Any other interesting, useful details I should know?

Also, I need the maid to come into contact with two other first class passengers, and for the three of them to spend a decent amount of time together. Not necessarily private (not a romance,) but it couldn't hurt. Is this a reasonable possibility while maintaining historical accuracy? Or would it be distasteful for first class gentlemen to be social with a maid? (They don't care, but I don't know what the general atmosphere was about this sort of mingling.)

Thank you so much in advance! I've been fascinated with the Titanic since early elementary school, but never realized the vast extent of my ignorance on the subject. Thanks for enlightening me!
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Just type maids valets in the search tab and you'll find lots of threads with info. A couple links below. Cheers.Welcome to the board.

 
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William Oakes

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Mar 6, 2020
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Hello! I'm in the research stage of a novel (time travel, should be fun!) and was hoping to find out some practical details of what life on the Titanic would have been like for a personal maid of a first class lady. I've seen on here that they ate in the maid & valet saloon and (if they were looking after their employer) slept in cramped, less desirable rooms on the interior, possibly shared with other maids/servants.

Does anyone know of more details than that? What the rooms were like? Whether they were single or double berths? Where were they, how far away from the first class staterooms? What kinds of things were on the menu for them? Practical things, like access to certain areas of the ship and expectations of them? What they wore? And I have so many silly questions, like how they knew when to go help their mistresses with whatever they needed if they weren't allowed in the first class areas during the day and slept probably a decent distance away from them? Any other interesting, useful details I should know?

Also, I need the maid to come into contact with two other first class passengers, and for the three of them to spend a decent amount of time together. Not necessarily private (not a romance,) but it couldn't hurt. Is this a reasonable possibility while maintaining historical accuracy? Or would it be distasteful for first class gentlemen to be social with a maid? (They don't care, but I don't know what the general atmosphere was about this sort of mingling.)

Thank you so much in advance! I've been fascinated with the Titanic since early elementary school, but never realized the vast extent of my ignorance on the subject. Thanks for enlightening me!
Read the book about Titanic Stewardess, Violet Jessup, entitled, Titanic Survivor. Great read and will give you tremendous insight. Good Luck!
 
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Thomas Krom

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Nov 22, 2017
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Good day to you,

On-board the Titanic there were a total of 38 servants traveling in first class. These are as follows in alphabetic order:

Ladies-maids, nurses, child nurses and female secretaries

Ellen Mary Barber (1885-1963): Personal maid to Mrs. Julia Florence Cavendish (1886-1963)

Albina Bassani (1880-1960): Personal maid to Mrs. Emma Eliza Bucknell (1853-1927)

Nellie Mayo Bessette (1872-1944): Personal maid to Mrs. Ella Holmes White (1856-1942)

Rosalie Bidois (1865-1938): Personal maid to Mrs. Madeleine Talmage Astor (1893-1940)

Ellen Bird (1881-1949): Personal maid to Mrs. Rosalie Ida Straus (1849-1912)

Grace Scott Bowen (1867-1945): Governess to master John Borie Ryerson (1898-1986)

Elizabeth Margaret Burns (1870-1921): Nursemaid to master Robert Douglas Spedden (1905-1915)

Victorine Chaudanson (1875-1962): Personal maid to Mrs. Emily Maria Ryerson (1863-1939)

Alice Catherine Cleaver (1889-1984): Nursemaid to Hudson Trevor Allison (1911-1929)

Sarah Rebecca Daniels (1875-19?): Personal maid to Bess Waldo Allison (1886-1912)

Caroline Louise Endres (1872-1964): Nursemaid of Mrs. Madeleine Talmage Astor (1893-1940)

Margaret Fleming (1870-1941): Personal maid to Mrs. Marian Longstreth Thayer (1872-1944)

Laura Mabel Francatelli (1880-1967): Personal secretary to Lady Lucy Christiana Duff Gordon (1863-1935)

Amalie Henriette Gieger (1876-1933): Personal maid to Mrs. Eleanor Widener (1861-1937)

Rose Amélie Icard (1872-1964): Personal maid to Mrs. Martha Evelyn Stone (1851-1924)

Emile Kreuchen (1882-1971): Personal maid to Mrs. Elisabeth Walton Robert (1868-1956)

Berthe Leroy (1884-1972): Personal maid to Mrs. Mahala Douglas (1864-1945)

Eugénie Elise Lurette (1852-1940): Personal maid to Mrs. Marie Eugenie Spencer (1864-1913)

Roberta Elizabeth Mary “Cissy” Maioni (1891-1963): Personal maid to The Countess of Rothes (Lucy Noël Martha Dyer-Edwards) (1878-1956)

Doña Fermina Oliva y Ocana (1872-1969): Personal maid to Mrs. Maria Josefa Perezde Soto y Vallejo Peñasco y Castellana (1889-1972)

Mary Anne Perreault (1878-1968): Personal maid to Mrs. Clara Jennings Hays (1859-1955)

Emma Sägesser (1887-1964): Personal maid to madame Léontine Pauline Aubart (1887-1964)

Augusta Jeanne Serreplaà (1881-1928): Personal maid to Mrs. Lucile Polk Carter (1875-1934)

Elizabeth Weed Shutes (1871-1949): Personal governess to miss Margaret Edith Graham (1893-1976)

Annie Moore Ward (1874-1955): Personal maid to Mrs. Charlotte Wardle Cardeza (1854-1939)

Helen Alice Wilson (1879-1939): Personal maid to Margaretta Corning Spedden (1872-1950)

Valets, manservants and male secretaries

Alexander Milne Cairns (1883-1912): Personal manservant to Mr. William Thornton Carter II (1900-1985)

John Farthing (1863-1912): Personal manservant to Mr. Isidor Straus (1845-1912)

Richard Thomas Fry (1872-1912): Personal manservant to Mr. Joseph Bruce Ismay (1862-1937)

Victor Gaitan Andrea Giglio (1888-1912): Personal manservant and secretary to Mr. Benjamin Guggenheim (1888-1912)

Charles Henry Harrington (1875-1912): Personal manservant of Mr. Clarence Moore (1865-1912)

William Henry Harrison (1866-1912): Personal secretary to Mr. Joseph Bruce Ismay (1862-1937)

Hammad Hassab (1885-1965): Interpreter and manservant to Mrs. Myra Raymond Harper (1863-1923)

Edwin Herbert Keeping (1878-1912): Personal manservant to Mr. George Dunton Widener (1861-1912)

Louis Gustave Joseph Lesueur (1876-1939): Personal manservant to Mr. Thomas Drake Martinez Cardeza (1875-1952)

Vivian Ponsonby Payne (1888-1912): Personal secretary and surrogate son to Mr. Charles Melville Hays (1856-1912)

Sante Righini (1883-1912): Personal manservant to Mrs. Ella Holmes White (1856-1942)

Victor Robins (1867-1912): Personal manservant to Colonel John Jacob Astor IV (1864-1912)
Survival rate during the sinking:

During the sinking 28 of the 38 servants travelling in the first class survived the sinking (73.68% in total), this includes all the female servants and 2 male servants. Ten of the servants, all male, sadly didn’t survive the sinking. Some died loyally alongside their employer.

Breakdown of their respective nationalities:

The servants had many different nationalities as well:

NationalityAmount of peoplePercentage of servants
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland1539.47%
The United States of America718.42%
France615.79%
Italy25.26%
Egypt25.26%
Canada25.26%
German Empire25.26%
Spain12.64%
Switzerland12.64%
Total38100%
Most manservant's to American Employers came from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Does anyone know of more details than that? What the rooms were like? Whether they were single or double berths?
This fully depends on which stateroom the servant occupied. Here is a complete breakdown in alphabetic order how the staterooms would look of each single servant who's exact stateroom is known in full detail:
(Renders are supplied by either GraceDudleyward (a friend of mine with whom I worked together) or Giovanni Castro. For some staterooms I don't have any renders for as the moment and I will send them to you later if you like)
Albina Bassani (1880-1960) in stateroom D-16

Mrs. Bucknell, Mrs. Bassani’s employer, booked for herself stateroom D-15 and Mrs. Bassani for the exact stateroom on the opposite side of the ship, D-16. D-16 was a mirrored version of D-15 with the exact same furniture, panelling and carpet.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two mahogany Cot beds, 9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A mahogany, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A mahogany dressing table with an oak chair.
Two mahogany wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
A double Doulton folding washing lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Nellie Mayo Bessette (1872-1944) in stateroom C-99
1633007663745.jpeg

C-117, a comparable stateroom, on-board the Olympic
1633006702487.png

1633006723649.png

Miss Bessette her employer, Mrs. Ella Holmes White, occupied stateroom C-32 along with her good friend, Miss Marie Grice Young. C-32 was located forward on the port side of on C-deck while C-99 was located amidships on the starboard side.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark green carpet with flowers with light green leaves.Mahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
An oak, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A double oak Doulton washing cabinet.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.

Ellen Bird (1881-1949) and John Farthing (1863-1912) in stateroom C-97

1633006824687.png

1633006841740.png

Miss Bird and Mr. Farthing shared the same stateroom, C-97. Their employers, Mr. and Mrs. Straus, occupied C-55 (A sitting room fitted out in the Regency style) and C-57 (fitted out in the Empire style, with white and gilt panelling and mahogany beds). C-97 was located nearly right across C-57, where Mr. and Mrs. Straus slept.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark green carpet with flowers with light green leaves.Mahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Grace Scott Bowen (1867-1945) presumably in stateroom B-61, B-67, B-79 or B-85
1633006899865.png

1633006914316.png

Presently it is unknown which staterooms were booked by the Ryerson family, B-57 (fitted out in the Modern Dutch style with brass beds and oak panelling), B-59 (fitted out in the Old Dutch style) and B-63 (fitted out in the Modern Dutch style with sycamore panelling and beds) are often listed but this isn’t factual in any way. Daniel Klistorner personally believes that the Ryerson’s were in B-77 (fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style, with brass beds), B-81 (fitted out in the Louis XVI style with oak panelling) and B-83 (fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style, with brass beds). It depends on where you believe where the Ryerson’s stayed to place Miss Bowen in her stateroom. All the suggested staterooms were identical however:

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.

Elizabeth Margaret Burns (1870-1921) in stateroom E-40 with the son of her employer

Miss Burns stayed in E-40, which she shared with the son of her employer Robert Douglas Spedden. E-40 was an alternative first/second class stateroom which was the third last in-board stateroom on E-deck to have been fitted out in the standard first class furniture

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A double Doulton folding washing lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Alexander Milne Cairns (1883-1912) in stateroom B-86
1633006646775.png

1633006666598.png


Mr. Cairns his employers, the Carters, occupied B-96 and B-98 a bit further aft of his stateroom (both fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style, with mahogany Cot beds).

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A sofa with red upholstery
An oak oval table
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Victorine Chaudanson (1875-1962) presumably in stateroom B-61, B-67, B-79 or B-85
1633006596674.png

1633006621959.png

Just as with her colleague, Miss Bowen, is it unknown where her employers stayed. She stayed in a similar stateroom as Miss Bowen.
FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A sofa with red upholstery
An oak oval table
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Alice Catherine Cleaver (1889-1984) and Sarah Rebecca Daniels (1875-19?) in stateroom C-26

Miss Cleaver, Miss Daniels and the Allison children occupied C-26 with Hudson Trevor Allison in a brass cradle.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two brass beds painted white as supplied by Hoskins and Sewell.
A mahogany, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A mahogany dressing table with an oak chair.
Two mahogany wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
A double Doulton folding lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.




Caroline Louise Endres (1872-1964) in stateroom C-45

Miss Endres occupied C-45, it is however presently unknown where her employees, the Astor’s, stayed exactly. C-62 (a sitting room fitted out in the Louis XIV style) and C-64 (fitted out in the Adam style) has been suggested but there is no proof to support this claim. C-17 and C-21 has been suggested however Daniel Klistorner, who suggested the possible placement, now believes they were in C-74 (in the Modern Dutch style with sycamore paneling) and C-76 (in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style)

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Margaret Fleming (1870-1941) presumably in stateroom C-114
1633014396804.png

1633014428558.png


FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
An oak corner wardrobe fitment, with mirror door and three drawers under, 2 feet wide
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Laura Mabel Francatelli (1880-1967) in stateroom E-36

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A double Doulton folding lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Richard Thomas Fry (1872-1912) presumably in stateroom B-102

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark red carpet with yellow and green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
An oak, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A double oak Doulton washing cabinet.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Amalie Henriette Gieger (1876-1933) and Edwin Herbert Keeping (1878-1912) in stateroom D-44

Mr. Keeping and Mrs. Gieger occupied D-44 while their employers occupied C-80

(fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style with oak beds) and C-82 (fitted out in the Italian renaissance).

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Victor Gaitan Andrea Giglio (1888-1912) in stateroom B-84, with his employer Mr. Benjamin Guggenheim
1633014334589.png

1633014350688.png


Mr. Giglio shared his stateroom with his employer, Mr. Guggenheim. It was fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style, with brass beds.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersWhite enamel walls with an oak dadoSee bellow
A four feet wide brass bed painted white as supplied by Hoskins and Sewell.
A 2.9 feet wide brass bed painted white as supplied by Hoskins and Sewell.
A sofa with red upholstery
An oak oval table
A white wicker chair.
An oak Doulton double washing cabinet
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A walk-in wardrobe, with a dresser, a rack for 2 lifebelts in it.
William Henry Harrison (1866-1912) in stateroom B-94
1633014282603.png

1633014299392.png


Mr. Harrison occupied a special stateroom, B-94 fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom B style. His employer, Mr. Ismay, occupied the parlour suite B-52 (A sitting room fitted out in the Louis XVI style), B-54 (fitted out in the Empire style with white gilt paneling and brass beds) and B-56 (fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom A style) further ahead on the same deck.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark red carpet with yellow and green flowersWhite enamel walls with an oak dadoSee bellow
Two light oak Cot beds, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak Doulton double washing cabinet
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A rack for 2 lifebelts
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
Hammad Hassab (1885-1965) presumably in stateroom D-49

Mr. Hassab had his stateroom close to his employers and friends, Mr. and Mrs. Harper in D-33.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.

Rose Amélie Icard (1872-1964) in stateroom B-28 with her employer Mrs. Martha Evelyn Stone


Miss Icard shared B-28 with her employer, Mrs. Stone.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark red carpet with yellow and green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two mahogany Cot beds, 9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A mahogany, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A mahogany dressing table with an oak chair.
Two mahogany wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
A double Doulton washing cabinet
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Emile Kreuchen (1882-1971) presumably in stateroom E-14

Miss Kreuchen occupied a stateroom on E-deck forward, while her employer, Elisabeth Robert, occupied B-3. It is possible this stateroom was E-14

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A double Doulton folding lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Berthe Leroy (1884-1972) and Augusta Jeanne Serreplaà (1881-1928) in stateroom C-138
1633014227878.png


1633014244479.png

Miss Leroy and Miss Serreplaá, desite having different employers, shared the same stateroom. Miss Leroy her employers, Mr. and Mrs. Douglass, occupied C-86 fitted out in the early Georgian style. Miss Serreplaá her employers, the Carters, occupied B-96 and B-98

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark green carpet with flowers with light green leaves.Mahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
An oak, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A double oak Doulton washing cabinet.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Louis Gustave Joseph Lesueur (1876-1939) in stateroom B-101

Mr. Lesueur occupied B-101, decently close to his employer Thomas Cardeza who occupied B-55 (fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom A style, Thomas his mother was in B-53)

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark red carpet with yellow and green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
An oak, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A double oak Doulton washing cabinet.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.






Eugénie Elise Lurette (1852-1940) in stateroom B-80

1633014126251.png

1633014198977.png

Miss Lurette occupied stateroom B-80, close to her employers Mr. and Mrs. Spencer in B-76 (fitted out in the Harland and Wolff bedroom A style)

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A sofa with red upholstery
An oak oval table
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Roberta Elizabeth Mary “Cissy” Maioni (1891-1963) presumably in stateroom E-11

Miss Maioni had her cabin somewhere forward on E-deck while her employer, the Countess of Rothes, occupied C-77 in the late Georgian style (She and her niece originally occupied C-37). It is false that the countess of Rothes in B-77 and Miss Maioni was in B-79

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A double Doulton folding lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.




Doña Fermina Oliva y Ocana (1872-1969) in stateroom C-109
1633013992792.png

1633014006146.png


Miss Oliva y Ocana occupied C-109, close to C-65 (fitted in the Queen Anne style) where her employers stayed, Mr. and Mrs. Peñasco y Castellana.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A double oak Doulton washing cabinet.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Vivian Ponsonby Payne (1888-1912) in stateroom B-73
1633013937417.png


1633013959984.png

Mr. Payne stayed near his employer and surrogate parents, Charles and Clara Hays, who occupied B-69 in the late Georgian style.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A blue carpet with dark blue sunflowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A sofa with red upholstery
An oak oval table
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Mary Anne Perreault (1878-1968) in stateroom B-24

Miss Perrault was quite a distance away from her employers, Charles and Clara Hays, who occupied B-69 in the late Georgian style.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A sofa with red upholstery
An oak oval table
A wicker chair.
An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
Sante Righini (1883-1912) in stateroom C-120
1633013890718.png

1633013907055.png

Mr. Righini occupied C-120, located quite a distance away from her empoyer Mrs. White in C-32.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark red carpet with yellow and green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A double oak Doulton washing cabinet.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Emma Sägesser (1887-1964) in stateroom B-35 with her employer Madame Léontine Pauline Aubart

Madame Sägesser shared B-35 with her employer, Madame Aubart.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark red carpet with yellow and green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
Two mahogany Cot beds, 9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A mahogany, foldable Pullman bed, above the first bed.
A mahogany dressing table with an oak chair.
Two mahogany wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
A double Doulton washing cabinet
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the second bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.


Elizabeth Weed Shutes (1871-1949) in stateroom C-125 with the daughter of her employer
1633013824035.png

1633013843471.png


Miss Shutes shared C-125 with the daughter of her employer, Margaret Edith Graham, to whom she was her governess.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A dark green carpet with flowers with light green leaves.Mahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
  • An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
  • An oak foldable pullman bed
  • A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
  • An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
  • An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
  • A wicker chair.
  • An oak Doulton washing cabinet.
  • A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
  • A Bracket ceiling fan
  • A luggage rack above the bed
  • A basket for personal belongings
  • A reading light beside the bed
  • Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
 
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Thomas Krom

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Nov 22, 2017
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Annie Moore Ward (1874-1955) in stateroom B-53 with her employer Mrs. Charlotte Wardle Cardeza
1633014749973.png


Miss Ward shared B-53 (in the Italian Renaissance style) with her employer, Mrs. Charlotte Wardle Cardeza.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A red carpet with yellow flowersSatinwood panelingSee bellow
A satinwood 3feet 9inches wide pedestal dressing table was fitted with eleven drawers surmounted by an adjustable framed mirror.
One 4 feet 4 inches wide Satinwood bedstead
One 2 feet and 10 inches wide Satinwood bedstead
A satinwood Doulton washbasin cabinet that was 3 feet 8 inches wide, with a veined marble top.
An adjoining satinwood chair with light grey upholstery.
A satinwood nightstand
A walk-in wardrobe, with a dresser, a rack for 2 lifebelts in it.


Helen Alice Wilson presumably in stateroom E-39 or E-41

Miss Wilson occupied an in-board stateroom near her employers, Mr. and Mrs. Spedden. It is believed to have been either E-39 or E-41. They were identical except for their location.

FlooringPanellingFurniture fittings
A green carpet with light green flowersMahogany panelling painted whiteSee bellow
An oak Cot bed, 2.9 feet wide and a length that varies from 6 feet and 6 inches to 6 feet and 9 inches.
A wall settee with a loose blue tapestry seat, which in the high season could be transformed into a second bed.
An oak wardrobe with three drawers, 2 feet and four inches wide, with a mirror on the wardrobe door.
An oak dressing table with an oak chair.
A double Doulton folding lavatory
A Bastian 1000 Watt electric heater
A Bracket ceiling fan
A luggage rack above the bed
A basket for personal belongings
A reading light beside the bed
Combined steward calling buttons and light buttons.
The four servants below sadly do not have any exact staterooms

Ellen Mary Barber (1885-1963)Presumably on C-deck, near her employers Mr. and Mrs. Cavendish. It is possible she had her stateroom on E-deck as well.
Rosalie Bidois (1865-1938)Somewhere on C-deck, the exact stateroom of her employers, the Astors, is unknown.
Charles Henry Harrington (1875-1912)Unknown without any leads.
Victor Robins (1867-1912)Somewhere on C-deck, the exact stateroom of his employers, the Astors, is unknown.
 

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
231
375
108
And I have so many silly questions, like how they knew when to go help their mistresses with whatever they needed if they weren't allowed in the first class areas during the day and slept probably a decent distance away from them?
On-board the Titanic personal maids and manservants often helped with the dressing of their employers, arranged their clothing for later use, either packed or unpacked things and many other comparable matters. Manservants and personal secretaries arranged where their employers ate as well by making their way to the enquiry office on C-deck. If they had to be fetched their bedroom steward or stewardess, who always was just one press on the call button away, from their employees.
What kinds of things were on the menu for them?
The maids and valets saloon had it's own pantry with a hot press, coffee water and milk boilers, water cooler and a range. Provisions were supplied from the stairwell, which directly connected to the first class pantry bellow. It is presently unknown exactly what was served, but I believe it would be simpler than what some of their employers had if they dined in the first class dining saloon on D-deck, let alone the first class restaurant on B-deck where á la carte was served.
What they wore?
The dress code would depend on their employer I would say. The male servants at the time would wear black suits, with often dark grey overcoats while the maids would wear aprons over any potential clothing.
Practical things, like access to certain areas of the ship and expectations of them?
The White Star Line/Oceanic Steam Navigation Company didn't place any boundaries for anyone travelling in first class, this includes the servants. I would say it would depend on their employer their wishes since some employers would eat with their servants on-board, while some others did not.
Also, I need the maid to come into contact with two other first class passengers, and for the three of them to spend a decent amount of time together. Not necessarily private (not a romance,) but it couldn't hurt. Is this a reasonable possibility while maintaining historical accuracy? Or would it be distasteful for first class gentlemen to be social with a maid? (They don't care, but I don't know what the general atmosphere was about this sort of mingling.)
I would say it depends on who these first class passengers are, in terms of being historical or fictional passengers. If it is the first option I would say that it depends on the passenger his or hers character while the later has more liberties.


I hope my multiple posts helped, it took a while to write them.


Yours sincerely,


Thomas
 
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LLWH

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Sep 14, 2021
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On-board the Titanic personal maids and manservants often helped with the dressing of their employers, arranged their clothing for later use, either packed or unpacked things and many other comparable matters. Manservants and personal secretaries arranged where their employers ate as well by making their way to the enquiry office on C-deck. If they had to be fetched their bedroom steward or stewardess, who always was just one press on the call button away, from their employees.

The maids and valets saloon had it's own pantry with a hot press, coffee water and milk boilers, water cooler and a range. Provisions were supplied from the stairwell, which directly connected to the first class pantry bellow. It is presently unknown exactly what was served, but I believe it would be simpler than what some of their employers had if they dined in the first class dining saloon on D-deck, let alone the first class restaurant on B-deck where á la carte was served.

The dress code would depend on their employer I would say. The male servants at the time would wear black suits, with often dark grey overcoats while the maids would wear aprons over any potential clothing.

The White Star Line/Oceanic Steam Navigation Company didn't place any boundaries for anyone travelling in first class, this includes the servants. I would say it would depend on their employer their wishes since some employers would eat with their servants on-board, while some others did not.

I would say it depends on who these first class passengers are, in terms of being historical or fictional passengers. If it is the first option I would say that it depends on the passenger his or hers character while the later has more liberties.


I hope my multiple posts helped, it took a while to write them.


Yours sincerely,


Thomas
Wow, thank you SO MUCH! This is fantastic! I really appreciate it!! :)
 
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LLWH

Member
Sep 14, 2021
6
4
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VA
Just type maids valets in the search tab and you'll find lots of threads with info. A couple links below. Cheers.Welcome to the board.

Thank you so much! I'm still getting acclimated to the site, so thanks as well for your patience with my probably redundant questions!
 
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Thank you so much! I'm still getting acclimated to the site, so thanks as well for your patience with my probably redundant questions!
Your Welcome. Don't be worried about asking redundant questions. They might be redundant to some but new to others. And besides you often get very informative responses like what was in Thomas's response. I've never ran across a lot of the info in that post. It was interesting to read. Cheers.
 
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Kevin P

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Nov 8, 2019
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Great research on the staterooms of the servants. I have seen their cabin allocations before and some things always strike me as a little odd:

- Benjamin Guggenheim, one of the richest men on the ship, shared a room with his valet (confirm by Steward Etches)
- The maids of Mrs. Douglas and Mrs. Carter sharing a room. I haven't seen any evidence that the Douglases and Carters knew each other. Considering how many empty rooms there were in First Class, it seems odd two women who did not know each other would be thrown in the same room so there must have been a connection
- Both the Wideners and the Strauses had their male and female servants share a room. It would have been a scandal for an unmarried male and female passenger to share a cabin (hence "Mr. and Mrs Thorne") but I guess when it was the servant class, people did not care as much