Nearer My God To Thee, Autumn, etc


Adam Burgess

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Dec 10, 2006
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>>Whatever they played, they certainly were brave.<<

>>No arguement with that one and in the end, I think that's what really matters.<<

I totally Agree
 
Sep 7, 2008
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I think,it was "Nearer my god to thee", because Wallace Hartley says,years before the disaster, when he stand on a sinking ship, he will play "Nearer my god to thee". And the band played this song.
 

jamie hague

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Sep 24, 2008
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Hi! I have read that Eva was a lover of French Bulldogs (me too) after meeting Robert Williams Daniel's. Does anyone know if there is any information about this? Cheers J
 
May 3, 2005
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I received this from the Choir Director at our Church:

>>We are recognizing the 100th anniversary of Titanic with the Navy Hymn-the one they played as they were on deck sinking....Is there some other piece you think we should play?<<

I realize this wasn't the "Navy Hymn" and some think it was the English Version of "Nearer My God To Thee."
Are there any suggestions from some of the more learned historians. All suggestions welcomed.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Keep in mind that accounts from the survivors differed on the last piece the small band played as the Titanic went down. Some were adament that it was "Autumn" and others were equally adament that it was "Nearer My God To Thee."

As controversies go, I don't think it'll ever really go away, but it's not all so wildly important that it inspires flamewars. The Californian on the other hand...
 

John O'Malley

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Oct 6, 2010
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I believe it is likely that both songs were performed.

Ofcourse, what songs they played doesn't matter on the whole. The point is that this brave fellowship of men stuck together and choose dignity over primal instinct in order to provide cheer and comfort to a situation filled with solemn. At least we can all agree on their commendable and inspirational heroism.
 
May 3, 2005
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There seems to be such a controversy that "Eternal Father, Strong To Save" would probably be as good a choice as any for the good people of Southlake, Texas.

http://www.whiteschapelumc.com

Thanks very much for all the information supplied on this posting.
happy.gif
 

Tad G. Fitch

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Dec 13, 1999
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John,
For what it's worth, I agree that it's likely that both songs were played at some point that night. Also, George Behe's article from his website has been revised, updated, and footnoted, and will appear as a 'guest appendix' in Kent Layton, Bill Wormstedt, and my upcoming book.

George was kind enough to update his article and let us use it in the book. My coauthors and I comment on his conclusions in the appendix, and offer some additional supporting evidence. There are some compelling conclusions regarding the last song(s), and of course a lot of information of what other songs were played that night.
 

John O'Malley

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Oct 6, 2010
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Robert,

"Eternal Father, Strong to Save" was a song that occurred to me. My only thought was that it might be a little overused. However, that's probably just the maritime enthusiast in me. The common audience probably don't hear it too often, so it could certainly work.

Tad,

I am certainly looking forward to reading "On a Sea of Glass". Any word on a North American release date yet?
 

Tad G. Fitch

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Dec 13, 1999
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Thanks John. Unfortunately, we're not sure what the US release date is going to be yet. For 'Centennial Reappraisal,' it came out overseas in November, and wasn't released in North America until a couple weeks ago. Since 'On A Sea of Glass' has a different publisher, I'm not sure if this will be the same or not. The release dates on Amazon.com and Amazon UK are guesses on their part. All we know is that the book will be out overseas any day now, and the US release won't be for a few months. If you don't want to wait, the preorder link in my signature allows US customers to get copies pretty quickly after the UK release date, before the official release here.

We will keep you updated.

All my best,
Tad
 
May 3, 2005
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John-

I agree with your thoughts on "Eternal Father, Strong to Save"and also from the same connection. I hadn't heard it mentioned as a possibility before I read Mr. Behe's article.My thoughts are that "Nearer My God To Thee" might be a little overused too.

I think the reason for the many mentions of different songs and tunes might be that these people were under a tremendous strain and what they thought they heard was due to their different backgrounds and experiences.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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In the chaos of those final minutes, the band could have been playing anything and people that remained on the deck wouldn't have recalled it correctly - obviously it wasn't on their list of priorities, and none of the band members survived to be able to answer the question.

Having said that, I think for the sake of tradition that one should go with "Nearer My God To Thee", that's always seemingly been the most widely accepted final song.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Thomas Ozel

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May 17, 2012
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Somewhere in my boxes of unsorted material I have a "pre-Ballard" audio tape in which Eva adamantly insisted that the Titanic went down in one piece. (As you know, she changed her story once Ballard discovered that the wreck was in two pieces.)

George

On weblink below is a BBC radio interview with Eva Hart from 1983 (unfortunately only people who live in the UK can listen to it). During the interview she says that she's sure the ship must have broken in half, judging by the falling back of the stern during the sinking. Also her conversation with the interviewer, about how she thinks it would be a tremendous scientific achievement to locate the wreck of Titanic, indicates that the interview is definitely pre-1985. Did Eva change her story before Titanic was discovered?

Thomas

BBC - Archive - Survivors of the Titanic - Today | Eva Hart, Titanic Survivor
 
C

Caroline Mendes Ferreira

Guest
Nearer my god to thee

There is a mystery around what Wallece Hartley anthem was playing in the last moments of the Titanic. Historians say it was Nearer my god to thee some witnesses also said they had never heard this song. In my opinion it was nearer my god to thee.

[Moderator's note: This message, originally a separate thread, has been moved to this existing discussion of the same subject. MAB]
 

Fourblades

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Mar 7, 2014
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G'day all,
This is my first post here and I'll throw in my two bobs worth on 'the last tune played' ... I believe it to to be Song of Autumn.
It's a beautiful tune,melancholy in a way,which could be fitting for the moment.... It was also on the bands set list as # 137..
Harold Bride was supposedly keen on Music and Song of Autumn was a popular Waltz at the time..
I'm a Musician (Flute and Guitar) and like to play this Waltz,jeez,even the Gypsies play it today !,Gypsy Swing , Django Reinhardt style !
This is a great web site and I'm very happy to be here... regards from Australia... Charlie..
 

RileyGardner17

Riley Gardner
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Jan 14, 2015
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Tossing my hat into the ring here, despite the fact this will obviously never be solved. Though it is fun to discuss.

After reading through this thread, I must say I'm a bit surprised at the acceptance of Propior Deo as the likely tune. I'm more than welcoming someone to school me on this, but some points: Hartley was a Methodist and certainly knew the tune, but what of the other musicians? Were they of the same denomination? The odds that all members of the band would have known this version is rather slim. It reminds me of what happened on Lifeboat B, when the men wanted to say a prayer but couldn't find a common religion. Someone requested the lord's prayer as the most appropriate, so they went with that. Now assuming Hartley played along with the band (the accounts all mention the band playing, not a singular player), they would have had to settle on a commonly known version they could all play: therefore, Horbury seems like the likely tune, does it not? Also those recognizing it were certainly not all British Methodists. Certainly they would have no recognized Propior as a version of NMGTT if they never heard it beforehand. Again, Horbury stands out there.

The theory of Autumn being played and then NMMTG seems to be quite plausible to myself. Had Bride escaped his cabin and heard Autumn before rushing to Lifeboat B, in the chaos if they switched to NMGTT he would not have noticed it. Gracie and Thayer also make no mentions of the band at all despite being rather near to them. Bride was slushed around in the water for a bit before coming under the overturned B and then onto it's surface where he "laid across and didn't care what happened". So clearly he wasn't too involved in his surroundings very much, therefore the claim of Autumn as the LAST song ought to be reconsidered as a whole.

There doesn't seem to be any logistical argument against the "Autumn first, NMGTT" second theory. Unless someone would be kind enough to prove all my theorizing wrong. :)
 
Nov 13, 2014
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Hartley was the band leader and ultimately decided which songs they played. The other musicians knew Prioper Deo because they studied it like all other ragtime songs they played that night.

On Collapsible B, there was no such hierarchy about which prayer to say. They all searched for a good prayer and it became the lord's prayer.
 

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