Need Help With Titanic Pictures


Aug 30, 2005
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Hello everyone. As some of u may know, i like to draw pictures of passengers on Titanic for fun. I have come to the boards a few times to ask people for suggestions. Again, i have come down with a case of "artist's block". I'm stuck and i do not know what to draw. If anyone has any ideas of what i could draw please write back.
Again, any suggestions would be a great help and may even help me overcome my artist's block.
Thanks very much!!
Andy
 
J

Jeffrey Beaudry

Guest
Perhaps Thomas Andrews in the last minutes before the final plunge?
 
Aug 15, 2005
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Darwen, United Kingdom
How about a first person view - looking down the boat deck at empty falls hanging from every davit; see all the victims as panic takes hold; highlight the women and children (think "Schindler's List"); allow the viewer to hear the cacophony of Titanic's death cries, the rushing water and the helpless cries of those left on board.
I can add volume to my artwork, but only for the ship. I can't even draw people, never mind express their emotions.
 
Apr 27, 2011
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Hi Andrew,

I had never heard anything about your works before, but I do think this is a good idea.

Why don't you choose a scene focusing on "life on board the Titanic" ? I'm quite sure it could be great.

You know there are many examples.
For instance, French passengers A.F. Omont, Pierre Maréchal, Paul Chevré and Américan passenger Lucian P. Smith were playing auction bridge when the Titanic hit the iceberg. A painting about them just a little while before the collision would be nice, to my mind.

See the full story below, taken from E.T. archives.

Best regards,

Franck

__________________

The Times

FRENCHMEN'S ACCOUNT

Saturday 20 April 1912

PASSENGERS' FAITH IN THE SHIP


We were quietly playing auction bridge with a Mr. Smith from Philadelphia, when we heard a violent noise similar to that produced by the screw racing. We were startled and looked at one another under the impression that a serious accident had happened. We did not, however, think for a catastrophe, but through the portholes we saw ice rubbing against the ship's sides. We rushed on deck and saw that the Titanic had a tremendous list. There was everywhere a momentary panic, but it speedily subsided. To the inquiries of a lady one of the ship's officers caustically replied, "Don't be afraid, we are only cutting a whale in two." Confidence was quickly restored, al] being convinced that the Titanic could not founder. Captain Smith nevertheless appeared nervous; he came down on deck chewing a toothpick. "Let everyone," he said "put on a lifebelt, it is more prudent." He then ordered the boats to he got out. The band continued to play popular airs in order to reassure the passengers. Nobody wanted to go in the boats, everyone saying "What's the use'?" and firmly believing there was no risk in remaining on board. In these circumstances some of the boats went away with very few passengers; we saw boats with only about 15 persons in them. Disregarding the advice of the officers many of the passengers continued to cling to the ship. When our boat had rowed about half a mile from the vessel the spectacle was quite fairylike. The Titanic, which was illuminated from stem to stern, was perfectly stationary, like some fantastic piece of stage scenery. The night was clear and the sea perfectly smooth, but it was intensely cold. Presently the gigantic ship began to sink by the bows, and then those who had remained on board realised to the full the horror of their situation. Suddenly the lights went out, and an immense clamour filled the air. Little by little the Titanic settled down, and for three hours cries were heard. At moments the cries were lulled, and we thought it was all over, but the next instant they were renewed in still keener accents. As for us we did nothing but row, row, row to escape from the obsession of the heartrendering cries. One by one the voices were stilled. Strange to say, the Titanic sank without noise and, contrary to expectations, the suction was very feeble. There was a great backwash and that was all. In the final spasm the stern of the leviathan stood in the air and then the vessel finally disappeared - completely lost. In our little boat we were frozen with cold, having left the ship without overcoats or rugs. We shouted from time to time to attract the attention of the other boats, but obtained no reply. With the same object a German baron [Alfred Nourney] who was with us fired off all the cartridges in his revolver. This agonizing suspense lasted for many hours, until at last the Carpathia appeared. We shouted "Hurrah" and all the boats scattered on the sea made towards her. For us it was like coming back to life. A particularly painful episode occurred on board the Titanic after all the boats had Seft. Some of the passengers who had remained on the ship, realizing too late that she was lost, tried to launch a collapsible boat which they had great difficulty in getting into shapc. Nevertheless they succeeded in lowering it. The frail boat was soon half full of water and the occupants one after the other either were drowned or perished with cold, the bodies of those who died being thrown out. Of the original 50 only 15 were picked up by the Carpathia, on board which we joined them. We cannot praise too highly the conduct of the officers and men of the Carpathia. All her passengers gave up their cabins to the rescued women and the sick, and we were received with every possible kindness. Similarly we bear sorrowful tribute to the brave dead of the Titanic. Colonel Astor and the others were admirable in their heroism and the crew fulfilled with sublime self-sacrifice all the dictates of humanity. Much useless sacrifice of life would have been avoided but for the blind faith in the unsinkableness of the ship and it all the places in the boats had been taken in time. What have we saved from the wreck? Omont has a hair-brush, Marechal a book "Sherlock Holmes" and Chevré nothing. We all three send to our families resurrection greetings, and it is with immense joy that we cry from this side of the Atlantic 'A bientot."
 
Aug 30, 2005
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Thanks for the idea. I'll keep it it mind! Currently, i am working on a picture of the chinese man (Fang Lang, i think) being rescued by lifeboat 14 after the ship sank. Thanks again

Andy
 
Apr 27, 2011
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Hi Andrew,

OK, let us know as soon as your work about the Chinese man is finished !

Where can we see your works ? Are they published on the Internet ?

Best regards,

Franck
 
Aug 30, 2005
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Sorry Franck, my drawings aren't published anywhere, but i might make a small collection of Titanic pictures and hopefully i will be able to put it on this site. I'll keep you updated on what i am working on next!

Andy
 
Apr 22, 2012
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If you enjoy drawing the passengers, perhaps you could do a picture of the scene in the gymnasium as the lifeboats were being lowered and T.W. McCawley was still instructing passengers on the use of the exercise equipment. You could include Colonel Astor using his penknife to cut open a life belt to show Madeleine what's inside, and also R. Norris Williams and his father.
 
Aug 30, 2005
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Thanks for the idea Brandon! I'll consider that when I draw my next few pictures. I really enjoy drawing the events on Titanic, with the actual passengers in them, because I can get a feel for what it was like to be there. I also would like to build a model of the ship one day, with passengers on the deck and lifeboats in the water. Thanks again!

Andy
 
Apr 22, 2012
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I've saw a few models like the one you're thinking of making, and I must say, when done correctly, they are breathtaking. I'm not sure I've ever seen one with miniature passengers, though. If you positioned the miniatures in small scenes accurate to what was actually happening onboard during the sinking, that would be stunning. And, since you're artistic, perhaps you could paint a backdrop for it showing the starry sky and the infamous 'mystery light.'
 
Aug 30, 2005
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I've currently taken a break with my drawings and i am working on a model. I've built the framework for it out of gardening wire and i will use balsa wood for the siding.
Franck- i could post some drawings on here if you want...I have drawn Madeleine Astor, Edith Russell and Alice Cleaver. Let me know!

Thanks

Andy
 
Aug 30, 2005
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Hi guys. Once again, i've come to this sight to ask you for help with my drawings. I want to thank all members of the site for giving me ideas and input for my art. Ok, i want to draw a a picture of the passengers disembarking from Carpathia. Are there any passengers that i should really include in the drawing? I want to try and draw the passengers faces' and their expressions as they left the rescue ship. If anyone has any ideas of who i should include, i would greatly appreciate it.
Thanks
Andy
 
Aug 30, 2005
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Hi guys. I'm thinking of drawing Alice Cleaver in my picture. Any input on the idea or the post above? Please post a comment if you think I should include anyone else.
Thanks
Andy
 
Apr 24, 2003
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Think about the arriving of Boat 12 to the Carpathia.... this would be a great picture... perhaps the Carpathia in the background and the crowded boat in the foreground... with Harold Bride, Lightoller or Colonel Gracie .. think about the photo showing Nr. 12 alongside the carpathia, it will give you a good draft.

Best regards,
Manuel
 

Michael lowe

Member
Apr 2, 2006
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Sorry, typing quick, i have to go!! maybe you should do a scene in the 1st class dining salloon. This would show a good idea of 1912 life in "the royalties"
 

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