New documentary on the Edmund Fitzgerald

Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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From the Canadian Press:

Edmund Fitzgerald sunk by rogue wave, not crew error: documentary

quote:

The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down, but the man who immortalized the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald has been moved to revise his iconic version of the story in light of some findings by a Canadian-produced documentary.
For the rest, go to http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hQkHH7UIGqofW-HODCJL7i6Drogw

Comment: The documentary will air on March 31st at 6 and 11 pm on History Television Canada. It will also air on the National Geographic Channel in the UK on April 6th at 9 pm. But there is no information, as to if and when this will air in the US.

In any case, for more information on the reasons behind this theory, click here for the Dive Detectives website.​
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
From Marine Link:

The Edmund Fitzgerald Still a Mystery After 35 Years
quote:

On November 10, 1975, in the most famous shipwreck in Great Lakes history, the Edmund Fitzgerald sank in a treacherous storm on Lake Superior. Now in conjunction with its anniversary of the ship sinking, Southport Video Productions, a film company specializing in documentaries on shipwrecks and lighthouses, has released a program titled The Edmund Fitzgerald Controversy.
More at http://www.marinelink.com/news/fitzgerald-mystery-edmund335811.aspx
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I caught this one last night myself. It was an interesting show which delved into the geological history of the region as well as some of the maritime aspects. The latter is sobering enough in it's own right, when you consider that the Great Lakes has been the location for at least 6000 shipping losses.
 
May 27, 2007
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Howdy Mike, I was surprised on how much the Great Lakes are used until I reflected to myself that 3 out of 4 documentaries I have watched recently concerned a shipwreck located in the Great Lakes.

I am certain that there is at least a ship from every decade down there and the lakes were used continuously from the 19th century onward due to the fact that Chicago used to and still does ship a lot of supplies on the Great Lakes.

I also liked how they seemed to touch on everything also from the draining of the lakes to that killer algae which is threatening the environment of the lakes, which was brought to the lakes by man in the 1980's.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,590
380
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Easley South Carolina
>>Howdy Mike, I was surprised on how much the Great Lakes are used until I reflected to myself that 3 out of 4 documentaries I have watched recently concerned a shipwreck located in the Great Lakes.<<

I wasn't surprised at all. Trade has been ongoing on the Great Lakes ever since European colonists/invaders (Depending on your point of view) arrived in the area. With the rich iron resources available in this region, it was a natural region for the growth of the steel industry. The Great Lakes are also a natural invasion route which is the reason that control of the lakes was so hotly contested during the War of 1812.

There's also the fact that the lakes are a natural and easy commerce route for grain since it's right in the middle of the richest and most productive grain producing regions on the face of the planet. Factors like that make for a thriving maritime industry and with it come the inevitable shipping accidents since the lakes are also known for some extremely vicious storms.
 
May 27, 2007
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I knew about the grain and the steel too, but I had no idea about the rich iron resources.

I only really know about Jackson and New Orleans in regards to the War of 1812. I had family living in Virgina at the time. It doesn't surprise me that the British of Canada were keen to get their hands on those 5 jewels.