New York collision photo


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Jul 9, 2000
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What you're looking at are the crew members on both. Since the New York was still laid up on account of the shortages caused by the coal strike, she wouldn't have had any passengers aboard. Any passengers in the photo would be the people leaning on the Titanic's rail.
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Thanks for that Michael. Have any of the crew / passengers in the photo ever been identified? For example, the chap standing a little apart from the rest of the group lining the rail looks fairly distinguishable. I think it would be interesting to identify as many people in the photo as possible, in a similar fashion as Senan Molony did in "The Irish Aboard Titanic".

Cheers,

Boz
 

Nigel Bryant

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Hi,

That's a nice photgraph, proably the best version I have seen. It's the first time I have see the cover for No.1 Hatch in that shot. Here's a question I would like to add. In books written about the Titanic departure, most state that there were hundreds of people watching Titanic's departure. Some even claim that smaller ships (the "New York") was crowded with sightseers to watch the Titanic go by? But photographs of that day, show little people on the decks of the New York and the Ocean dock.

It seems to me that it is a myth that there were large crowds of people waving from the dock and from smaller ships. Because the photgraphs taken on that day certainly don't show this, well not to the large extent that I have seen written in texts and seen in movies. It seems to me that Titanic's departure was just an ordinary departure, no hype, no thousands of people swarming the dockyards, that we have imagined in our minds these recent years. Wasn't Olympic's maiden departure from Southampton more like what we have envisoned/belived what Titanic's take off was meant to be?

Cheers,

Nigel
 

Steven Hall

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I agree. When you look at the UFTM, courtney frame (No ?) with Cpt Ben Steele sitting on the dockside bollard - the send off appears quiet lame indeed.
I would image that the coal strike had left the dockside rather short on potential observers seeing people off.
It almost seemed like a yawn.
More people witnessed the launch of the Olympic, more people travelled on Olympic’s maiden voyage, more people watched her depart Belfast on the trials, more people dockside to see her off from Southampton.
The only advantage Titanic had over the elder sister (for the sake of interest) was that she sank.
 
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Looks like Steve covered the ground here. Yeah, except for that close call with the New York, the reality is that the Titanic's departure was something of a non-event.

Maiden voyages were not all that popular with experienced travelers, the steerage folks were not the sort of people that commanded attention from the media and last but not least, Titanic was the second sister to the much celebrated Olympic. So who cares about the second sister? It's not likely she was going to do anything noteworthy. Right?

By the morning of 15 April, this attitude would change slightly.
smoke.gif
 

Steven Hall

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You know Michael, I even thought Olympic looked better.
Not taking anything away from Titanic, which I believe would have looked better with 3 funnels.
In part, her enclosed forward A deck and extended B made her look a class act.
I have PhotosShop, I should take a funnel off and reposition the remaining three to see what it would have looked like.
It would have been interesting if Titanic had not been lost whether White Star would have offered her up instead of Olympic during WW1.

Steve
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Given the way the war went, I wonder if the Titanic would have seen much use at all. With just the Olympic and Britannic, there was still the matter of the ships spending time laid up as surplus.

I'm not sure that any of the three functioning funnels could have been moved either. It's not like the boiler rooms could be moved around and that would have limited what you could do with the funnel arrangement.
 
Oct 17, 2002
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I know its not the subject here, but 3 funnels? Blasphamy. The four funnels, in my opinion gave her a shape no other came close to. She (And of course her sister) were recognizable anywhere.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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There is this thing called symmetry. In addition, 4 stackers gave the appearance of greater power and size even if only 3 funnels were really functional with regard to the boiler spaces. It seems that in those days the number of funnels a ship carried was also treated as a status symbol of advancing shipbuilding technology. The only thing that may have worked in changing appearance would be to have reworked the machinery spaces so 3 working funnels and the two masts could be spaced about equally apart and the funnels made quite a bit larger in their overall dimensions to give them that powerful look; e.g., look at a profile of the Queen Mary. But as for me, the 4 funnels on the Olympic class and their arrangement along with the locations of their two masts was just one of the attributes that made them beautiful ships to look at. Too bad modern day cruise ships look as bad as they do. But then again, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
 

Jeremy Lee

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It seemed that the number of funnels was a major factor in attracting people to sail on the ship in those days!
 
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>>It seemed that the number of funnels was a major factor in attracting people to sail on the ship in those days!<<

That's my understanding as well. To the traveler, it spoke of size, speed and safety. That they could be wrong on all three counts rarely entered into the equation. It was the perception that mattered.
 
Aug 28, 2001
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From the time I became a THS member, I got to see lots of ships of the era in photo form. This may sound dorky, but to me, RMS Titanic was the best looking of all those ships. The A-deck enclosure added something I can't quite put my finger on. The decks were fairly clear-not cluttered w/ machinery,vents,etc. And the rake of her masts and funnels was perfect. She just looks BETTER than all the others!
 
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>>There is this thing called symmetry.

Those photos taken in early 1912 showing the Titanic with just its 3 functional (and unpainted) funnels make it look like a big, fat old tuna boat. It's amazing what that fourth raked funnel and some fresh paint did for the looks of that ship. Other ships, the two big Cunarders and the German Lloyd Line's, had 4 funnels too, but they never looked quite as debonaire or as aesthetically pleasing as those Olympics.

I agree with you, Sam, about the appearance of current cruise ships. I've had plenty of opportunities to observe them up close and they strike me as being as cluttered and unappealing to look at as a Mad Magazine caricature of an over-chromed, over-accessorized, over-priced late-1950s Detroit automobile.
 

Tom McLeod

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I believe White Star/Harland and Wolfe went with it's "Yacht like lines" on the Olympic class ships, just as they had done previously on the Big Four and the Oceanic. So in many pictures the ships never seemed to look as huge as they where, which is a nice touch. I miss the funnels period. But times change. The QM2 has a funnel, it's a different design then past funnels, but doesn't thrill me. To this day 3 to 4 QM2 funnels would be a kick. I thought the Normande pulled off the 3 funnel design well, but their size made up for the lack of the fourth. Plus the unique buff color the WSL ships carried, that would have been nice to see in person.
 

Tom McLeod

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Four wins in my book, but 3 isn't as bad as I thought, two is almost Georgic style. One funnel yuck. Thanks for the renderings.
 
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