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News from 1888 Maiden Voyage of Cufic I

Discussion in 'Cufic I 1888-1901' started by Mark Baber, Dec 21, 2002.

  1. Mark Baber

    Mark Baber Moderator

    On 21 December 1888, Cufic I arrived in New York at the
    conclusion of her maiden voyage from Liverpool. This article appeared
    while she was en route.

    The New-York Times, 14 December 1888

    THE LARGEST CARGO STEAMER
    ---
    The White Star freight steamship Cufic, which sailed from Liverpool Dec.
    8, and is expected to arrive here about the 20th, is the largest
    cargo-steamer in the world. She was launched early in October from the
    yards of Harland & Wolfe [sic], Belfast, and the present is her initial
    trip. The length of the Cufic is 444 feet, gross registered tonnage,
    4,800; measurement capacity, 8,632 tons; carrying weight 6, 500 tons.
    She is a single screw, eight-compartment steel steamer, with water
    ballast; has four masts, one funnel, and triple expansion engines. Her
    sister ship, the Runic, is now in progress of construction. The two
    ships are not especially designed for speed, but it is expected that
    under ordinary circumstances they will be able to make the trip in from
    10 to 12 days.

    -30-
     
  2. Mark Baber

    Mark Baber Moderator

    MAB Note: I'm not entirely certain, but I believe the "Capt. Smith" mentioned here is Henry Smith.

    The New-York Times, 22 December 1888

    CITY AND SUBURBAN NEWS
    ---
    NEW YORK


    ***

    The Cufic, the new White Star freight steamer, said to be the largest
    "tramp" steamer afloat, arrived yesterday on her first voyage from Liverpool
    and docked at the Pierpont Stores in Brooklyn. The new steamer is of 4,660
    tons measurement, has four masts, the foremast being square rigged, and is
    built straight stemmed. Capt. Smith is in command of her.

    -30-
     
  3. Mark Baber

    Mark Baber Moderator

    Correction: The Capt. Smith referred to here is E. J. Smith, not Henry Smith.