News from 1900-01: Launch and maiden voyage of Runic II


Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,291
307
353
The Times, 26 October 1900

THE WHITE STAR LINE---The new colonial fleet of the White Star Line has
been brought a step nearer completion by the launch of the twin-screw
steamer Runic, which took place yesterday at Belfast. This steamer is
565ft. in length, 64ft. in breadth, and her gross tonnage is 12,400,
constituting her one of the largest passenger steamers afloat, and she
is the 43rd vessel launched by Messrs. Harland and Wolff for this
company. During the last four years seven steamships of the largest
type, aggregating 86,501 tons, have been launched by Messrs. Harland and
Wolff for the White Star Line. These vessels are all propelled by
double sets of engines and twin screws. In dimensions and most other
respects the Runic is similar to the Afric, Medic, and Persic, which have
already gained popularity with passengers in the South African and
Australian trades. Only one class of passengers is carried. For these
the accommodation provided comprises dining, reading, and smoking rooms,
with ample bath and lavatory arrangements. On the Runic certain further
improvements have been made. For instance, the dining-room, which will
seat over 400 passengers, has been placed on the upper deck, where there is
thorough ventilation, and by reason of its proximity to the pantry and
galley rapid service of meals is ensured. To carry out this arrangement
the poop has been connected with the bridge-house and forms a spacious
promenade 300ft. long, and the large house which serves for the
passenger entrance will be fitted with comfortable seats forming a sort
of lounge. The writing and reading room is also situated on this deck.
The extension of the poop has further allowed a number of two and four
berth deck-rooms to be provided. The Runic will be refrigerated for the
carriage of 100,000 carcases of mutton, and she will also have space for
20,000 bales of wool. It is now more than 12 months since the Medic
began the steam service of the White Star Line to South Africa and
Australia, connecting the mother country with two of her most important
colonies by an all-British route. On her maiden voyage the Medic
conveyed the first colonial contingents from Australia to South Africa.
On her present outward voyage she carries the table on which the Queen
signed the Australian Commonwealth Bill. The Runic is appointed to sail
from Liverpool for South Africa and Australia on Saturday, January 19.
The Suevic will also be launched shortly, and is expected to enter
the service in the new year.

-30-
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,291
307
353
The Advertiser, Adelaide, 12 February 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


SHIPPING NEWS
***
The White Star liner Runic, which arrived on Monday, left Liverpool on
January 3 at 8.13 p.m. She had strong south-east winds and heavy sea
crossing the Bay of Biscay, but moderate north-east trades. The equator was
crossed on January 15 in long. 10° W.; thence to Table Bay moderate to fresh
south-east winds were experienced. She reached Cape Town on January 24 at
5.30 a.m., and after landing passengers and embarking mails and passengers
left at 4.10 p m. same day. The easting was run down in lat. 45° S.,
moderate to strong westerly breezes prevailing until two days before
arrival, when strong north-east winds were encountered to Cape Borda, which
was passed at 4 a.m. on February 11. The passage from Liverpool was made in
37 days 21 hours 4 minutes. Captain Kempson has with him as officers:-
Messrs. T. Kidwell (formerly of the Oceanic), chief; E. J. Fletcher (Medic),
first; J. Fox, R.N.R., second; W. B. Sewell, third; E. Pilcher, fourth; Dr.
S. S. Defree, surgeon; Messrs. M. Barry (Medic), steward in charge; G.
Wright (Persic), chief engineer; W. H. Lyon, second; J. Turner, third; J. W.
Pascoe, third extra; E. G. Sterine, fourth; H. Furlong, fifth; D. Whiteford,
sixth; F. O. Hoyes, seventh; R. Muir, refrigerating engineer. The weather
was so hazy and so thick with smoke that when the Runic passed Cape Borda it
was barely possible to make the headland out. The heat was very oppressive
ashore, but tempered by the breeze across the sea, and the people of the
Star [sic; no "White" in original] liner rather liked it, as they had
experienced very cold weather on the voyage. The vessel has 8,000 tons of
cargo on board, and discharges 1,100 here. On the voyage out a child named
Gladys Mary Mountford, three years of age, died on January 27. She was on
the passenger list for New South Wales. The vessel will probably sail at
midnight to-night.

-30-
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,291
307
353
The Argus, Melbourne, 13 February 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


THE S.S. RUNIC
---
The steamship Runic, which is now at Adelaide on her maiden voyage, is the
forty-third vessel built by Harland and Wolff, of Belfast, for the Liverpool
White Star line, and the fourth of the line engaged in the Australian
service, those previously launched being the Afric, the Medic, and the
Persic. All the vessels are of the same type, being of immense
dimensions---the Runic's gross tonnage is 12,482 tons---and having cargo
capacity on a corresponding scale. They are also furnished with twin screws
and double sets of engines, these points being now generally recognised as
elements of safety at sea, especially on long voyages. In regard to their
passenger accommodation, they make an altogether new departure. One class of
passengers only is carried. Distinctions of saloon, second cabin, and
steerage are thus abolished, while for the fares charged the accommodation
is altogether unique. It comprises dining, reading, and smoking rooms, and
ample bath and lavatory arrangements. To the Australian the opportunity thus
afforded, of travelling to and from the old country at a moderate fare has
specially appealed and the new departure has proved successful beyond
expectation. On the Runic certain further improvements have been made, which
should be much appreciated. For instance the diningroom, which will seat
over 400 passengers, has been placed on the upper deck, where there is
thorough ventilation, and, by proximity to the pantry and galley, rapid
service of meals is ensured. To carry out this arrangement the poop has been
connected with the bridge-house and forms a spacious promenade 300ft. long.
The Runic may be expected to reach Port Melbourne within the next few days.

-30-
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,291
307
353
The Argus, Melbourne, 15 February 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


THE S.S. RUNIC
---
The Runic is the latest and largest steamer of the White Star line to visit
Australia. She is now on her maiden voyage and may be said to have more than
fulfilled the expectations formed of her, especially as regards speed. The
trip from Liverpool to Adelaide only occupied 37 days and 21 hours, a
performance rarely surpassed by steamers proceeding via the Cape. A detailed
description of the Runic appeared in "The Argus" on Wednesday last. The
mammoth vessel arrived in Hobson's Bay last evening, and, upon being granted
clearance, took up a berth alongside the Port Melbourne Railway Pier, where
the steamer Persic---another giant representative of the White Star
line---is lying. The Runic is under the command of Captain Kempson, who
reports that departure was taken from Liverpool on the 3rd January. In the
Bay of Biscay the vessel experienced very heavy weather, and proved herself
a splendid sea boat. Generally speaking, a favourable passage was had to
Cape Town, where she arrived on the 24th January, and whence she resumed her
voyage the same afternoon. In shaping a course for Australia the 45th
parallel of latitude was chosen, and the run across was productive of the
customary strong breezes. The Runic arrived at Adelaide on Monday last, and
having landed a number of passengers and a large quantity of cargo she left
there again for Melbourne on Thursday morning, arriving here as stated. The
most striking feature about the Runic is her immense sweep of deck, an
uninterrupted promenade of 300ft, being afforded. The dining saloon is a
very spacious and well-lighted apartment, capable of seating 400 passengers
in comfort. Upon the arrival of the vessel at Adelaide passengers expressed
themselves highly gratified with their sojourn on board. Captain Kempson,
who was for some time in command of the Oceanic, in the Liverpool-New York
trade, has associated with him the following officers:---Thos. Kidwell,
chief officer; E. J. Fletcher, first officer; Jas. Fox, R.N.R. second
officer; W.H. Sewell, third officer; E. Pilcher, fourth officer; S. S.
Depree, surgeon; M. Barry, steward in charge; Geo. Wright, chief engineer;
[unreadable; should be "W. H. Lyon"], second engineer; Jno. Turner, third
engineer.

-30-
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,291
307
353
The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 February 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


THE RUNIC
---
THE LATEST ADDITION TO THE WHITE STAR LINE

---
The Runic, a sister ship to the Persic and Medic, and the latest of the
ships built for the White Star Australian line, berthed at the Quay
yesterday. She is of 12,000 tons, and a detailed description of her
dimensions and appointments has already been given. The passage, for weather
conditions, was made in splendid time, and the vessel's steadiness in a
seaway is warmly praised by passengers. Liverpool was left on January 3,
strong south-easterlies prevailing while crossing the Bay of Biscay. The
equator was recorded on the 15th in 10° W., and the trades enabled fine
progress being made to Capetown on 24th. Passengers and mails having been
embarked, the voyage was resumed same evening. Easting was made over the
45th parallel, the prevailing westerlies proving strong until February 11,
off Cape Borda, when a N.E. change set in. At Adelaide 1100 tons merchandise
was landed. On January 27 Gladys Mary Mountford, 3 years of age, on the
passenger list for New South Wales, died from natural causes. Commander
Kempson's officers are:-Messrs. T. Kidwell (formerly of the Oceanic), chief;
E. J. Fletcher (Medic), first; J. Fox, R.N.R., second; W. B. Sewell, third;
E. Pilcher, fourth; Dr. S. S. Defree, surgeon; M. Barry (Medic),
steward-in-charge; G. Wright (Persic), chief engineer; W. H. Lyon, second;
J. Turner, third; J. W. Pascoe, sup. third; R. Muir, refrigerator. At each
port Captain Kempson was presented with testimonials from disembarking
passengers, expressive of their appreciation of attention to personal
comfort. Several entertainments were arranged on the voyage, the proceeds
being donated to the Melbourne Children's Hospital and Liverpool Seamen's
Orphanage.

-30-
 

Similar threads

Similar threads