News from 1901: Suevic's maiden voyage


Mark Baber

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The West Australian, Perth, 3 May 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


ALBANY NOTES
---
Albany, May 2
---
The shipping in the harbour yesterday established a record for the port,
there being no less than eight steamers and three sailing ships in port at
the same time, representing 45,000 tons. The list of steamers comprised
H.M.S. St. George, H.M.S. Juno, White Star liner Suevic, Sussex, Emma,
Evandale, Colac, and Willyama. Notwithstanding the amount of work involved,
the harbour officials and agents got through it expeditiously. The White
Star liner Suevic is a new ship with the latest improvements, her passenger
accommodation being an especial feature.

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Mark Baber

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The Advertiser, Adelaide, 4 May 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


THE WHITE STAR LINE
---
The "Liverpool Mercury" of March 20 thus describes the new steamer Suevic,
of the White Star line, which was launched at the yards of Messrs. Harland &
Wolff, Belfast, on December 8:--

Like her sister ship the Runic, the Suevic, which is the 44th vessel built
by Messrs. Harland & Wolff for the White Star Company, has a gross tonnage
of 12,482 tons, while she measures 565 ft., beam 63 ft., and depth 40 ft.,
constituting her one of the largest boats afloat. The spacious dining
saloon, capable of seating upwards of 400 passengers at one time, the
reading and writing and smoke rooms, with ample bath and lavatory
arrangements, are each and all such as would have been regarded as luxurious
even for saloon passengers a few years ago. Without exception the many
improvements for the general comfort and convenience of passengers
introduced on the Runic have been extended to the Suevic, with here and
there, in fact, further additions. For instance, the reading and writing
room is a new departure on the Runic and Suevic; and the dining saloon is a
deck above that of the Afric, Medic, and Persic. This latter
admirably-appointed apartment is thoroughly ventilated, as may be said of
every part of the ship, and by its close proximity to the pantry and galley
rapid service of meals is ensured. To bring this dining saloon arrangement
about the poop has been connected with the bridge-house and forms a spacious
promenade 300 ft. long. The reading and writing room is provided with a
library consisting of several hundreds of volumes --- comprising not only
standard works, but volumes of magazines, books of travel, and, in fact,
works on handicrafts --- and several very convenient writing-desks; the
general room, which is furnished with a piano, is twice the size of that on
the Afric; and for the special benefit of smokers a lofty and comfortably
equipped apartment is provided. One can easily imagine the pleasure which
can be derived by voyagers in such a vessel as the Suevic, whether it be in
the various rooms referred to, or whether on the decks, where there is room
and to spare for deck billiards, cricket, and many other games in which a
number of people can join; and that the six weeks or so occupied by a
journey to the Antipodes in the White Star liners is rendered enjoyable and
entertaining amidst such surroundings is evidenced by the interesting
volumes which from time to time have been published of the newspapers issued
during the voyages of the Persic and Medic. The sleeping accommodation,
which is sufficient for 468 passengers, consists of two, three, and
four-berthed apartments, as well as general rooms (for men), and a special
feature is a capital laundry, where travellers may wash their clothing, a
fine space being set apart on the deck close by for drying purposes. The
quarters of Captain Alford, R.N.R., who is in command, his officers and
crew, numbering 146, are superb. Chief Engineer Bell has control of the
mechanical arrangements, which in the Suevic, as in the other Australian
liners of the White Star Company, are a marvel of perfection. To descend
into the depths of the engine-room, which was most aptly likened unto a
great engineer's shop, proved most entertaining, for apart from the main or
double sets of engines which drive the twin propellers --- an important
element of safety on long voyages --- there are no fewer than 40 auxiliary
engines. One of these is capable of producing 50 tons of fresh water from
saltwater every 24 hours; others are utilized for pumping out the ship's
tanks, for distributing water throughout the ship for sanitary purposes, for
refrigerating, and for illuminating the ship with electricity. A peep into
the stokehole, where are situated five boilers, requiring something like
9,000 tons of coal to feed them in a round voyage, illustrated the wonderful
coolness of this part of the ship, thanks to the excellence of the
ventilation; while a walk along the tunnels, in which are the gleaming steel
shafts running out to the propellers, is by no means the least attractive of
the sights aboard the liner. The Suevic, like the Runic, has refrigerating
capacity for 100,000 carcases of mutton, in addition to being able to carry
20,000 bales of wool, and she is admirably equipped with derricks for the
handling of cargo. The rapidity with which this can be carried on was
exhibited yesterday, not only in regard to the stowing of cargo in the
holds, but also in connection with the shipment of coal from a barge
alongside. With the Suevic, the total tonnage of the White Star line engaged
in the trades between Great Britain and the colonies of Australia and New
Zealand is brought up to 80,000 tons.

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Mark Baber

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The Advertiser, Adelaide, 6 May 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


ARRIVAL OF THE SUEVIC
---
The White Star liner Suevic, stately in her magnificent proportions and
enormous power, came up out of the haze at Largs Bay at 8 a.m. on Sunday,
and, although expected, almost took the boarding staff by surprise, as the
offing was enveloped in mist, and she was close up before even her enormous
bulk, with a funnel large enough to drive a buggy and pair borough, could be
made out. She took up the usual berth outside the ocean buoy in a sea so
calm that the bottom could be seen fathoms below. Dr. Wilson, acting health
officer, went off and received a report from the Suevic's surgeon that there
were three cases of fever, the patients being passengers en route, and one
case of scarlatina, a male adult passenger for Adelaide. Dr. Wilson mustered
all on board, made a careful inspection, which took same time, and saw the
patients. The vessel was quarantined until 6 p.m., no one being allowed to
leave. During this time. she was thoroughly fumigated. The steamship had on
board 396 passengers, of whom 27 were for Adelaide, including six returned
soldiers---Sergeant J. Rundle (of the S.A. Bushmen), Corporal T. W. Wilkins,
and Troopers H. T. Hall, W. Trower, J. H. Smyth, and C. H. Packard (of the
Imperial Bushmen). There were also 90 returned soldiers of various corps for
the sister States, all in charge of Captain Garside. Lieutenant Kubale, from
the Adelaide Staff Office, went off to meet the men and bring them ashore.
The passengers landed after 6 p.m. The scene alongside the White Star liner
was interesting and amusing. Alongside her towering hull were clustered the
passenger boats and official launches, waiting the signal to begin
operations, and a running fire of good natured banter between the throng on
the lofty altitude of the mammoth's decks and the occupants of the
cockleshells below made things lively. An enterprising fruit-vendor went off
with a quantity of apples, and the soldiers slung a biscuit tin over,
hauling it up with its freight of fruit continuously. The scarlatina patient
was sent ashore to the Adelaide Hospital, and the others were isolated on
board. With the exception of these cases the health of all on board was
excellent. The voyage of the Suevic furnished nothing of note. Some of the
people found the weather in Australian waters uncommonly cold. The Suevic
will not leave till to-morrow, as she has a quantity of cargo to handle.

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Mark Baber

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MAB note: There seems to have been no detailed report of Suevic's actual 9
May arrival at Melbourne in The Argus, perhaps because it coincided with the
opening of the first Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia by the Duke
of Cornwall and York (future King George V), an event which dominated the
news columns the next day.

The Argus (Melbourne), 9 May 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


S.S. SUEVIC
---
The new mammoth steamer Suevic, the last of the fleet of five 12,000-ton
vessels ordered by the White Star line for its service between Liverpool and
Australia, will arrive here this morning. The Suevic was launched from the
yard of Harland and Wolff, Belfast, in December last. The Suevic, like her
sister ship Runic, is of 12,482 gross tonnage. Her dimensions are:--Length,
565 ft.; beam, 63ft.; depth, 40ft. She is supplied with double sets of
engines, driving twin propellers, an important element of safety on long
voyages. The Suevic and her four sisters of the White Star Australian
fleet -- Afric, Medic , Persic, and Runic -- are all of uniform dimensions
and type in regard to their passenger accommodation. For the fares charged,
this accommodation may be termed unique, and would have been regarded as
luxurious for saloon passengers a few years ago. In the Suevic, as in the
Runic, the diningroom is placed on the upper deck where there is thorough
ventilation, and by proximity to the pantry and galley, rapid service of
meals is assured. To effect this, the poop is connected with the bridge
house, whereby is formed a spacious promenade 300ft. in length.

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Mark Baber

Moderator
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Dec 29, 2000
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The Sydney Moring Herald, 21 May 1901
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


THE STEAMER SUEVIC
---
The Suevic, which arrived on Saturday from Melbourne, is the latest of the
White Star line in the trade between Liverpool, Capetown, and Sydney. The
steamer, which was built by Messrs. Harland and Wolff for the company, has a
gross tonnage of 12,482 tons, while she measures 565ft., beam 63ft., and
depth 40ft. The spacious dining saloon, capable of seating 400 passengers,
the reading and writing and smoke rooms, with ample bath and lavatory
arrangements, are each and all such as would have been regarded as luxurious
even for saloon passengers a few years ago. Without exception, the many
improvements for the general comfort and convenience of passengers
introduced on the Runic have been extended to the Suevic, with here and
there, in fact, additions. For instance the reading and writing room is a
new departure on the Runic and Suevic and the dining saloon is a deck above
that of the Afric, Medic, and the Persic. This latter admirably appointed
apartment is thoroughly ventilated, as may be said of every part of the ship
and by its close proximity to the pantry and galley rapid service of meals
is ensured. To bring this dining saloon arrangement about, the poop has
been connected with the bridge-house, and forms a spacious promenade 300ft.
long. The reading and writing room is provided with a library consisting of
several hundreds of volumes --- comprising not only standard works but
volumes of magazines, books of travel, and, in fact, works on
handicrafts --- and several very convenient writing desks; the general room,
which is furnished with a piano, is twice the size of that on the Afric, and
for the special benefit of smokers a lofty and comfortably equipped
apartment is provided. The sleeping accommodation, which is sufficient for
468 passengers, consists of two, three, and four berthed apartments as well
as general rooms (for men), and a special feature is a capital laundry,
where travellers may wash their clothing, a fine space being set apart on
the deck close by for drying purposes.

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