News from 1902-03: Corinthic enters service

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The Times, 25 July 1902

THE NEW WHITE STAR STEAMER CORINTHIC---The Corinthic, which has recently
left the yard of Messrs. Harland and Wolff, Belfast, for her steam
trials, is the second of three large twin-screw steamships ordered by
Messrs. Ismay, Imrie, and Co., White Star Line, for the service between
London and New Zealand, which has for many years been carried on in
conjunction with the Shaw, Savill, and Albion Company (Limited). The
dimensions of the Corinthic are the same as those of her sister ships
Athenic, which arrived in London from New Zealand a month ago, having
successfully completed her first voyage round the world, and Ionic,
which was launched on May 22, and will shortly be ready to take her
place in the service---namely, length over all, 515ft.; b.p., 500ft.;
breadth, 63ft.; depth, 49ft.; gross register tonnage 12,231 tons. There
is accommodation for 94 saloon, 84 second, and 186 third-class
passengers. In addition, the three vessels all possess a great cargo
capacity, including ample refrigerating space for the importation of
mutton. Since 1888 the White Star Line has had 21 twin-screw steamships
built for its various trades.

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The Mercury, Hobart, 2 January 1903
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ARRIVAL OF THE CORINTHIC
---
The White Star liner, R.M.S. Corinthic, which has been chartered by the
Shaw, Savill and Albion Co., arrived from London at 1.45 p.m. on Thursday,
on her maiden voyage, and was berthed at Alexandra Pier by the Harbourmaster
(Captain M. McArthur). The Corinthic is an immense ship of 12,231 tons, and
is similar in every detail to the Athenic, which has twice visited Hobart
this year, and which vessel has been fully described in these columns.
Captain Inman Sealby, Lieut R.N.R., who was at Hobart a couple of years ago
in the Persic, is in command of the Corinthic, and was very pleased to find
that a new pier had been built to meet the requirements of these large
vessels. The Alexandra pier is of ample dimensions to accommodate steamers
of much larger tonnage than the Corinthic. This vessel could lie there
loaded to her maximum draught of 32ft. 6in. at low tide, and still have
water to spare.

The Corinthic brought about 30 passengers for Hobart, and 381 tons of
general cargo. There are 295 passengers aboard for New Zealand ports. The
voyage occupied 42 days, and was uneventful. Leaving the Royal Albert Docks
on November 20, a call was made at Plymouth to pick up additional passengers
and mails, that port being left on November 22. A short stay was made at
Teneriffe on the 27th, and a course was then shaped for Capetown, which was
reached on December 13, and left the same day. The Corinthic is four days
ahead of time-table. At the Cape 250 passengers were disembarked, and two
taken aboard. With the exception of very heavy weather experienced in the
Bay of Biscay, the passage has been a very fine one. In the Bay of Biscay
the sea was particularly rough, and the course was altered for ten hours to
make the ship ride easier. The vessel's sea-going qualities are very highly
spoken of.

The Corinthic takes in about 400 tons of coal, and sails at 8 a.m. to-day
for Wellington.

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The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, 3 January 1903
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A SAILOR KILLED
---
ON BOARD THE CORINTHIC

---
HOBART, Friday
---
William Hardwick, aged 42, belonging to Hull, in England, and boatswain on
the s. Corinthic, was killed at 7 o'clock this morning. He was unshipping
one of the derricks on the vessel, and while removing a pin the boom came
down and tell against the mast, crushing the unfortunate man's head very
badly. Death was instantaneous.

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The Evening Post, Wellington, 7 January 1903
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CORINTHIC
---
The Shaw, Savill and Albion Company's new steamer Corinthic arrived in the
stream last evening from London via Capetown and Hobart. She was berthed
early this morning. The vessel left London on the 21st November and Plymouth
on the 23rd, with 33 (?) saloon, 79 second cabin, and 452 third-class
passengers. She experienced heavy westerly gales crossing the Bay of Biscay,
and arrived at Teneriffe on the 28th November, leaving the same day. Fine
weather was experienced to Capetown, which was reached on the 3rd December.
The vessel left the same day after landing 9 saloon, 11 second cabin, and
227 third-class passengers. With the exception of several days' foggy
weather the trip was fine to Hobart, which was reached on 1st January. The
vessel started for New Zealand on the 2nd, and reached Wellington last
evening after a passage totalling 45 days 16 hours 56 minutes.

The following are the Wellington passengers- First saloon- Misses Carrick,
Heath, Harmer, Tevers, Winter, Mesdames Heath, Sanders, Bell, Messrs Heath,
Sanders, Master Heath. Second saloon - Misses Cuthbert (2), Mesdames Lock
and 4 children, Baird, Cuthbert, Dalisou, Messrs Baird, Cooper, Cowham,
Crowe, Tylor, Cuthbert. There are also 208 third-class passengers.

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The Evening Post, Wellington, 9 January 1903
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[Untitled]

Another accident occurred on the steamer Corinthic to-day, when a fireman
named John Cocklin, aged about 22 years, fell down the engine-room skylight
a distance of 20ft or 30ft, breaking his thigh. A bar across the room broke
the fall, or the man's injuries would have been more serious. Cocklin comes
from Poplar, London, where his parents reside. He has been taken to the
Wellington Hospital.

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Oops! Overlooked this one on Saturday; that's why it's a bit out of order here.

The Evening Post, Wellington, 8 January 1903
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THE CORINTHIC
---
DESCRIPTION OF THE VESSEL

---
The Shaw, Savill and Albion Company's new steamer Corinthic, which arrived
on Tuesday night, is a capital example of the big liner. She is a vessel of
12,231 tons gross and of 7832 tons net register, her dimensions being-
length over all, 515ft; between perpendiculars, 500 ft; breadth, 63ft; and
depth 49ft. She has exceptionally comfortable accommodation for about 100
first-class, 100 second-class, and about 200 third-class passenger under
normal conditions. The first-class dining saloon is in the fore end of a
large deck-house on the upper deck. It is tastefully decorated with white
and gold panels, in satinwood framing, that presents a most attractive
appearance, whilst it is a well lighted and roomy apartment. The library,
which is immediately above the saloon, is spacious, and is conveniently
situated, whilst it is well sheltered. It is about 10ft high, and is fitted
with comfortable lounges and chairs, and with a large bookcase, containing a
well-selected assortment of books. The room is decorated in carved oak, and
is surmounted with an ornamental skylight, whilst, as in the main
dining saloon, light is admitted by a series of large windows of stained
glass, which are all the more effective and interesting from the decorative
point of view, as each treats of a different subject. The floor is laid with
parquetry. The first saloon smokingroom is upon the same deck as the
library, but further aft. It is a handsome apartment, and is decorated in
embossed leather, with mahogany furniture, whilst the walls are covered with
a rich paper of an attractive design, making the room both cosy and
comfortable, whilst a series of pictures add to the appearance of the
apartment, which, of course, it is hardly necessary to add, is perfectly
ventilated. The flooring is of rubber tiling. In the second saloon
accommodation the diningroom is decorated in polished hardwood, whilst the
various appointments are really handsome, and in fact are very little
inferior to the first-class. There are also a comfortable library, with a
well selected assortment of volumes, which should appeal to all tastes, and
a smokingroom, which is furnished in a style very similar to that of the
first-class. A feature of the cabin accommodation is the adoption of the
ingenious arrangement known as the "Bibby" system, by which all the inner,
as well as the outer berths, are lighted with sidelights from the outside,
each cabin thus having a port-hole of its own. The rooms are all
particularly large, the comfort of the passenger having evidently been
the first consideration of the designers of the Corinthic. The same
principle has prevailed throughout the cabin accommodation and whether in
the two, three, or four berth cabins it can be safely said that attention to
details and the benefit of experience have resulted in the provision of
accommodation such as is not excelled in any vessel afloat. The third-class
accommodation is, perhaps, one of the most noteworthy features of the huge
ship, and it is really surprising how the company can provide their patrons
in this class with such roomy two, four, or six berth cabins as they do, and
then feed them and carry them nearly thirteen thousand miles at a charge of
less than a farthing a mile. At the after end of the ship is the third-class
dining saloon, which is furnished with separate revolving chairs, whilst
even there is to be found a piano for the use and amusement of passengers,
who have also a library as well as a smokingroom set apart for their
exclusive use. Like all the vessels of the White Star fleet, the
Corinthic is lighted throughout with electricity, whilst ample ventilation
is provided everywhere by means of electrically-driven fans. Provision is
also made for the comfort of voyagers when the vessel is in the colder
latitudes, the warming and heating of the ship being effected by an
elaborate arrangement of steampipes and steam heaters from end to end of the
vessel.

The machinery was constructed by Messrs. Harland and Wolff. It
consists of' two sets of quadruple expansion engines, each having cylinders
22in, 31 1/2in, 46in, and 66in, by a 48in stroke. The working pressure is
215lb to the square inch, and the indicated horse power is 4900. At
seventy-eight revolutions, and burning about eighty tons of coal a day, the
Corinthic is capable of a speed of 12 1/2 knots. Steam is procured from five
boilers of the multi-tubular type, three being double-ended, and the other
two single ended. Altogether she has twenty-four furnaces. The adoption
of the Yarrow, Schlick, and Tweedy system of balancing the engines has
resulted in the vibration being reduced to a minimum. The depth from top to
bottom of the Corinthic is just 80ft. The chief engineer has a staff of 45
men, and no less than 55 auxiliary engines under his care in addition to
the main engines. Included is the direct-acting steam steering gear, which
is fitted with Wilson and Pirie's patent quadrant. There are over nine
hundred electric lights in the ship, in the wiring of which nearly eighty
miles of wire have been used. The three electrical engines of the Corinthic
produce electricity at a power of a hundred volts.

In addition to hospitals for both sexes, accommodation has been specially
set apart for the isolation of any cases of infectious sickness that may
arise during the voyage.

Captain Inman Sealby is in command of the vessel, and has under him: - Mr.
A. E. Cooper, chief officer; Mr. Jno. J. Symons, first officer; Mr. E. L.
Trant, second; Mr. F. G. Cooper, third; and Mr. G. F. Dugdale, fourth. Mr.
Geo. Wright is in charge of the engineroom, and has under him-Mr. P.Adamson,
second; Mr. N. Harrison, third; Mr. P. Stevens, fourth ; Mr. R. Scales,
fifth; and Mr. J. Leggatt, sixth engineer. Mr. H. Edgar is first
refrigerating engineer, with Mr. H. P. Lewis as second; and Mr. H. Green is
electrician. Mr. J. L. Milne is in charge of the clerical department. Dr. J.
S. Hall is surgeon of the vessel; while Messrs. M. Barry and A. M'Donald are
chief and second stewards respectively.

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The Evening Post, Wellington,. 10 January 1903
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FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE WHARF
---
The list of accidents in connection with the steamer Corinthic was still
further added to this morning, when a man named Frederick Field, in the
employ of the Union Company, who was engaged in transhipping coal from a
hulk into the steamer fell from a plank running from one boat to the other,
struck his head against the hulk, and dropped between the two ships into the
water. Another man named M'Keever also fell off the plank at the same time,
but he saved himself by catching hold of a rope. Field made an ineffectual
attempt to save himself by catching hold of the other man, but he could not
hold out. Field had several ribs broken and his skull injured, and after
being attended to by Dr. Henry he was taken to the hospital. He was a
married man with a wife and family residing in Upper Willis-street. The
Hospital authorities state that the unfortunate man died soon after reaching
that institution.

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The Evening Post, Wellington, 12 January 1903
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WHARF FATALITIES
---
At the Hospital on Saturday afternoon the Coroner opened inquests
concerning the death of Frederick Field, who way killed while engaged in
coaling the Corinthic on Saturday morning, and as to the death of Oscar
Moss, who died on Friday as the result of injuries sustained through falling
between the wharf and the Manaroa on 4th January. In the former case the
evidence showed that Field had six ribs broken, and died from shock. As
several witnesses have to be called the enquiry was adjourned till tomorrow.

[The balance of this article concerns the Moss inquiry and has not been
transcribed.]

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The Evening Post, Wellington, 14 January 1903
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THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE WHARF
---
INQUEST ON FIELD

---
When we went to press yesterday afternoon, the District Coroner (Mr. J.
Ashcroft) was hearing evidence bearing upon the death of Frederick Field,
coal worker, who died from the results of a fall on the Corinthic last
Saturday. Sub-Inspector O'Donovan represented the police, and Mr. Jellicoe
appeared for the deceased's family.

The Coroner and the jury visited the upper deck of the Corinthic, and
examined the scene of the accident. Resuming,

James M'Keever, coal worker, who was working on the staging with Field, gave
an account of the accident. A basket of coal from the hulk Oceola did
not land squarely on the trolly on the staging from which the two men were
working. Field and himself made an effort to balance the basket, but the
tilt was too much for them, and both men lost their balance and fell on to
the deck of the Corinthic 5ft below the staging. Witness was on the inner
side of the plank, and fell clear of the edge of the deck. Field fell on the
unprotected edge of the Corinthic's deck, rolled, and fell 35ft into the
water between the hulk and the Corinthic. Witness said the baskets, which
when full weighed about 4cwt often tilted when landing on the trolly. A net
over the exposed portion of the Corinthic's dock would have prevented Field
falling overboard. It was dangerous work. Side-ropes had since been placed
alongside the plunk from which Field fell.

Edward O'Reilly, hulk-keeper, who saw the accident and jumped into the
harbour and rescued Field, also gave evidence. He said that if there had
been bulwarks upon that part of the Corinthic's deck where Field fell, the
latter would not have rolled overboard. A net or side-ropes would also have
prevented the fall overboard.

Charles Martin, winchman, and Louis Anderson, wharf labourer, were the other
witnesses. The latter said he saw Field strike the rail of the 'tween deck
of the Corinthic on his fall from the upper deck.

The jury brought in the following verdict: -"We find that Frederick Field's
death was caused by a fall while coaling on the Corinthic, such fall being
accidental. We wish to add that no precautions were provided for preventing
such accident, and recommend that special provision be made in future when
similar work is being done."

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The Star, Christchurch, 17 January 1903
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ACCIDENT ON THE CORINTHIC
---
The run of the s.s. Corinthic from Wellington was marred by an accident, by
which three members of the ship's company were injured. About 3.45 p.m.
yesterday an explosion of hydrogen gas occurred in the tank room of the
vessel's refrigerating department. The chief refrigerating engineer, Mr
Edge [sic; should be "Edgar"], was burned about the face and hands, and two
greasers, William Curl and Daniel Callaghan, were badly burned on the face,
arms and hands. They were attended to by the surgeon of the ship, Dr Hall,
and this morning Curl and Callaghan were removed to the casual ward at
Lyttelton. All the sufferers are progressing favourably.

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The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, 23 January 1903
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Accidents on a Steamer-Two accidents occurred on the steamer Corinthic
during her voyage from London to Wellington. The first happened on
December 15 to a young man named Frank Noton, who, after serving in South
Africa, had gone to England, and was working his passage back to New Zealand
as a steward. Noton was assisting to get some store out of the hold when,
through a hook cat hing [sic] in an angle-iron supporting the hatches, he
was precipitated a distance of 30ft., his skull being fractured and his leg
broken. The sufferer was placed in the ship's hospital, where he received
every attention. He was taken to the Wellington Hospital on the arrival of
the vessel there. The other accident was to a boatswain named W. Hardwick,
who was crushed against the mast and killed whilst unshipping a derrick.
Death was instantaneous. The unfortunate man was 49 years of age, and this
was his first trip since 1895, when he was on the Ionic. A collection was
taken up on the steamer in aid of Hardwick's widow, and the result was that
£33 9s 6d was collected.

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The Poverty Bay Herald, Gisborne, New Zealand, 20 February 1903
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VISIT TO THE S.S. CORINTHIC
---
The party, which, at the kind invitation of Mr W. B. Common, visited the
White Star liner Corinthic yesterday, spent a most enjoyable couple of hours
on board. Captain Inman Sealby, R.N.R., commander of the vessel, and Captain
Evans, marine superintendent of the Shaw, Savill and Albion Company, in
whose service she is employed, received their guests at the head of the
companionway, and took them upon a personally-conducted tour of the ship.
The Corinthic---like her sister ships, the Athenic, which has already been
here, and Ionic, which is to follow---is a vessel of magnificent
proportions, and the round of her decks, of which there are three available
to passengers, makes quite a lengthy walk. The plan of the vessel is
practically the same as the Athenic, which has been fully described. Her
gross tonnage is 12,231 tons, or one ton less than the Athenic, showing how
closely the steamers have been built to a pattern, but there are minor
architectural differences between the two ships that were pointed
out to the visitors during the inspection. For instance, the division of
the saloon staterooms has been made so that all thee interior cabins shall
have the advantage of the light and ventilation that a port-hole
affords. The cabins run in a row two deep along the port side of the ship.
Those on the inside have a recess 3ft wide, extending to the wall of the
ship, in which there is a port-hole. This gives the cabin light and air,
and the recess forms not only a wardrobe, but a cosy [sic] corner for
retirement. It is a very happy arrangement, adding greatly to the comfort of
the passengers and making one set of cabins quite as comfortable as another.
What perhaps impressed the visitors most was the comfort of the second-class
accommodation. The cabins are spacious and well-furnished, fully as good as
those upon our intercolonial steamers; there is a large and well-furnished
dining-room, a smoking-room and library, handsomely decorated and most
comfortably upholstered, and, in fact, every convenience that passengers
would be able to obtain in the first class of many a steamer which a few
years ago was regarded as thoroughly up-to-date. The third class
accommodation of the Corinthic is also greatly in advance of that which was
thought to be fitting for steerage passengers not so long ago. There are
two, four and six-berth cabins, plain, but clean and comfortable, a spacious
dining-room, a smoking-room, and a good deal of deck accommodation. There is
berthing on the main deck for 200 passengers of this class, and on the lower
deck for 200 more, but the latter is not used on the voyage to London, and
is being dismantled to allow of the stowage of cargo. Returning to the
saloon, the visitors were impressed with the luxury of the surroundings. The
ship, in her first class passenger space, is elaborately furnished. There is
an air of solidarity and comfort about everything. The interior of the
saloon is of beautifully-grained oak, and the carvings and decorations are
rich and chaste. The floors throughout the ship are covered with rubber
tiling, to prevent the feet slipping when the ship is in motion. The
state-rooms are spacious and well-furnished. The engine-room was visited,
and the visitors were conducted through the maze of machinery by Mr Wright,
the chief engineer. The Corinthic, like all the modern boats of the White
Star fleet, has a double set of engines, with twin screws, and the
engine-room is fitted up with the most up-to-date devices of machinery. The
visitors were initiated into the mysteries of the numerous cranks, pumps,
fans, dynamos, condensers, and refrigerators required to equip the large
steamer, and the engines were set in motion for their special benefit. It
was remarkable with what ease the massive machinery was moved and reversed.
For greater security there is a double system of telegraphs between bridge
and deck, and on the bridge a tell-tale indicator showing exactly how and at
what speed the engines are moving. The officer in charge is thus able to
ascertain whether his orders are immediately obeyed.

The tour of the steamer having occupied a good hour, an adjournment was made
to the dining-hall, where a recherche luncheon was laid out, and this being
done justice to, retirement was made to the smoking-room, where a pleasant
half-hour was spent.

Before leaving Mr DeLautour was called upon by his Worship the Mayor to make
a few remarks. He stated that he had been comparing notes with Mr Townley,
and found that they two had probably had a longer connection with the Shaw,
Savill and Albion Company than anyone else on the ship. They were conveyed
to New Zealand on Shaw-Savill ships, both leaving England m March, 1863. Mr
Townley got to the colony in 100 days, and the speaker in 120. He had
pleasure in welcoming Captain Wheeler again. Many years ago he had the
pleasure of standing on the Port Chalmers wharf alongside the late Mr
Mcandrew, when Captain Wheeler brought up the s.s. Hawea, just out from
Home. He had watched his career in New Zealand ever since with great
interest. Addressing Captain Sealby, he stated that they were greatly
obliged to him for his hospitality that day. They hoped they were going to
see him often. They were going to double their production in the next few
years. The country was going to be opened up, and this district had an
enormous extent of valuable country which was not available at present
because unfortunately all the best schemes of Government and men as regards
this land had resulted in failure, and the last experience, he was sorry to
say, was again a failure, and the Government had yet to find a road by which
it could turn the forest into valuable grass land. They were going to double
their exports within a few years. Next year both the Gisborne and Taruheru
works expected to put through 70,000 to 100,000 sheep more than this year.
The Shaw-Savill Company was treating them very well. They had been afraid
they were going to have a block next month, but it had been arranged that
day to get a third ship in March. The pressure on their space was more than
they could cope with, and the demand for space more than they could meet.
They were, however, doing their best, and were making arrangements, as he
had said, for dealing with some 150,000 more sheep next season, while in
five or ten years' time they expected that the capacity of both works would
be doubled. They therefore hoped to have Captain Sealby's presence here on
more than one occasion, and when he came they would give him a hearty
welcome to their harbor and their homes. (Applause.)

Captain Sealby expressed his pleasure at having them aboard his ship. He was
quite prepared to take in just as much cargo as they could pack into the
12,000 ton space of the Corinthic. There appeared to be no reason why as
time went on Gisborne should not have a vastly increased output of sheep,
which appeared to be practically the backbone of the place. When they were
ready the company he represented would be ready to take it away. So far as
the harbor was concerned he had found no difficulty. It was his first visit
here. Before he came he got the best advice he could, and he followed the
lines laid down on which their harbor was presented to the world, and here
they were, in what he considered to be a good, safe position. He would have
no hesitation in future in entering the port on the same lines. The
facilities were here, and they had a good harbor, good water, and what was
perhaps better still they had a glorious country behind.

Captain Wheeler briefly responded, expressing his pleasure at the reminder
of old times, which he considered were the best times.

Mr Common referred to the presence of Captain Evans, formerly commander of
the s.s. Aotea. It was, he said, a great gratification to everybody in
Poverty Bay to see such large steamers in, port. A few years ago, in their
most sanguine dreams, they would not have expected to see such a fine
steamer a» the Corinthic in their roadstead. When in years gone by Mr
Mcandrew, who had been referred to that day, said that he looked forward to
seeing a line of steamers between New Zealand and England he was laughed at,
and was told that there was not sufficient trade to warrant it. Now they had
these steamers coming to Poverty Bay once a fortnight; in fact, on an
average once a week, and, he was glad to say, that there was as much cargo
as they could take. There was a sure prospect of the trade being doubled. It
was a matter of gratification to them all.

Good-byes were then said, and the visitors, having thoroughly enjoyed their
visit, transhipped to the Waihi, and were brought back to the wharf at 2.30
p.m.

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Marlborough Express, Blenheim, New Zealand, 23 February 1903
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PICTON NOTES
---
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT)

***
The great passenger boat s.s. Corinthic awoke the echoes early on Sunday
morning with her siren. After entering the harbor she steamed round and
anchored outside Mabel Island. She is the largest passenger boat in the
world, and much excitement was caused by a report that she would be open for
inspection at a charge (for the hospital) of one shilling per head. There
appears to be no provision made for loading her, and consequently she will
remain where she is at anchorage outside the harbor till Tuesday morning,
when she will steam in and take the frozen mutton from Kaipupu. In the
meantime the idea of making a charge has been abandoned, and no doubt many
people from Blenheim and Picton will visit the boat, whose passenger
accommodation and general fittings are well worth inspection. The secretary
of the Picton C.C. is trying to arrange a match with the visitors.

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The Evening Post, Wellington, 12 March 1903
Retrieved from the National Library of New Zealand web site,
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=p&p=home


ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES
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At the hospital yesterday afternoon the Coroner (Mr. J. Ashcroft) and a jury
(of which Mr. Worth was foreman) enquired into the death of Frank Noton, who,
while assisting in getting outstores the steamer Corinthic on December 15th,
was precipitated into the hold and seriously injured. He sustained a
compound fracture of the skull, and a compound fracture of the right leg,
was admitted to the hospital on arrival in port on 7th January, and died on
9th March. The witnesses called were Alex. M'Donald, second steward on the
Corinthic, who had charge of the work, Arthur Herman, steward, who was
working the winch, Jacob Alfred Wahren, who was assisting and was standing
on the hatch adjoining that on which Noton stood, Dr. C. S. Hall, the
Corinthic's surgeon, and Dr. Ewart, Superintendent of the Hospital. It
appeared that Noton was standing on the hatch, looking after the
"fall"---giving the signal to the winchman to go up or down. When the stores
had all been got up, deceased gave the signal to raise the sling and hook
for the last time, and apparently swung out the hook as it rose, for it
turned and caught on the beam on which the hatch rested. The support being
taken away, the hatch fell, Noton going with it some 28ft. If any one was to
blame deceased himself was. Wahren said the whichman went very steadily, and
was not to blame at all. It was the common thing to stand on the hatch, and
Noton had done the same thing before. Dr. Hall said the injured man bled
very much, and he ascertained from Noton's sister, who was on board, that he
was a "bleeder," like the rest of the family. Her little boy had nearly lost
his life through bleeding after a tooth-extraction when two years old. The
bleeding was eventually stopped before Noton left the ship. Dr. Ewart said
death was due to exhaustion following on hemorrhage and fever. The accident
caused the hemorrhage, and would not nave been fatal had he not been a
"bleeder." The disease was a hereditary constitutional one, called
hæmophelia. There was nothing certain to overcome bleeding in such cases.
The jury found that deceased met with his injuries through accidentally
falling down the hold, and that they would not have been fatal had be not
suffered from hæmophelia.

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