News from 1908 Cymric Rescues the Crew of St Cuthbert

Mark Baber

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The New York Times, 4 February 1908

15 LOST FROM BURNING SHIP
---
The Cymric Saves Capt. Lewis and 36 Men from the St. Cuthbert Off Cape
Sable
---
WIRELESS TO THE TIMES
---
Dispatches from the Cymric, Five Hundred Miles Away, Describe the Rescue
---
FIRE STARTS ON SUNDAY
---
The Men in Desperate Straits, Driven to the Bow by the Flames
---
A BOATLOAD DROWNED
---
Sailors Who Put Off from the Doomed Vessel Were Swamped In Heavy Seas
---
By Wireless Telegraph to THE NEW YORK TIMES
---
ON BOARD WHITE STAR STEAMSHIP CYMRIC, off Cape Sable. N. S.. Feb.
3---The steamship St. Cuthbert, Capt. J. Lewis, bound from Antwerp to
New York, was burned at sea Sunday, and to-day was abandoned, a smoking
hulk.

Capt. Lewis and thirty-six members of the crew were rescued after a
thrilling and desperate battle with mighty waves, by the Cymric, which
stood by the blazing craft for nine hours.

Fifteen of the crew of the St. Cuthbert, who took a desperate chance for
life, were drowned in an attempt to leave the burning steamer on Sunday
afternoon; the lifeboat having been swamped in the heavy seas, which
tossed the helpless vessel with her panic-stricken crew.

Nine days out from Queenstown, bound to Boston, we on board the Cymric
sighted the burning steamer off the coast of Nova Scotia at 7:30 this
morning. The St. Cuthbert then was completely at the mercy of the
tempest, and was the prey of the flames. The weather was of the worst. A
tremendous gale was blowing from the west, with blinding snowsqualls,
accompanied by a sea that made attempts at rescue all but impossible.

The plight of the men aboard the St. Cuthbert was desperate in the
extreme. For many long hours they had been fighting the flames, but
brave as were the storm-pitched British sailors on the Cymric, and eager
as they were to go to the aid of the helpless fellows on the
flame-enveloped freighter, to have launched a boat meant certain death.
No boat could live in the gale and seas of that stormy Winter morning,
and Capt. Finch decided that there was nothing to do but wait and hope
for abatement of the gale and falling of the seas.

The steamship Cambrian, also west-bound, which we passed at daylight,
drew up at noon, and both the Cymric and the Cambrian circled for hours
about the burning vessel seeking the advantage of a position from which
a boat would be protected against the terrible wind and waves.

The two vessels conversed together and with the St. Cuthbert until 2
o'clock this afternoon when the storm abatetd [sic] somewhat, and the
Cymric decided to lower a boat. Manned by First Officer Stivey and a
crew of six man, who manoeuvered the boat brilliantly, it reached the
St. Cuthbert without mishap and lay on her lee, protected by a copious
use of oil.

Nobody descended for ten minutes. Then a heavy figure was lowered,
followed by another. Then twelve men descended the ladder. Horror
stricken the passengers and crew of the Cymric saw the inmates of the
returning boat, blackened with smoke. Two of the rescued men were
frightfully burned on the face and arms. The bodies of the two
helplessly beat against the ships [sic] side when they were hoisted by a
loop under the arms.

We dressed their wounds, and meanwhile Capt. Finch ordered the boat
hoisted to secure a better position for a new start. The sufferers
received every care. Their wounds proved happily superficial. Nearly
everybody had the soles of the feet burned, beside bruises.

Stivey and his crew insisted on completing their task of rescue, though
the others on the St. Cuthbert asked for a chance to save the ship. A
blinding snow storm was now raging, and the seas were still frightfully
high. Search lights were rigged and signal flash torches arranged and
the boat made two more trips, rescuing thirty-seven in all.

We feared collision or loss of position, and the flashlights and the fog
horn repeatedly restored mutual knowledge of our and their whereabouts
The boat returned on the last trip at 6:30 half full of water, having
been stove in when she took on her final passengers, as there was nobody
to lend a hand at the ropes above.

But not all who manned the burning steamer escaped. Yesterday fifteen
of' the crew of the St. Cuthbert perished in the attempt to leave the
burning vessel. Facing death amid the flames, which had baffled all
efforts of the crew, they launched a lifeboat and trusted their fate to
the seas. But their hopes were shortllived, for undoubtedly the boat was
swamped in the tremendous seas, and all were drowned.

Capt. Lewis and several members of the crew of the St. Cuthbert were
severely burned and injured, and it is probable that had not assistance
come when it did they would not have long survived the twin perils of
fire and storm.

The St. Cuthbert was ablaze from stem to stern when she was abandoned.
She was lying directly in the track of trans-Atlantic traffic bound to
New York and Boston.

The seacocks of the burning ship were left open, and she has now
probably sunk.

After effecting the rescue the Cymric proceeded and, coming into
communication with the Marconi station at Cape Sable, we were able to
report the disaster. We will reach Boston to-morrow. Both steamers were
westward bound.
-----
Special to The New York Times
---
HALIFAX, N. S., Feb. 3---The liner St. Cuthbert burned at sea yesterday,
and but for the heroism to-day of the crew of the Cymric of the White
Star Line all of the St Cuthbert's crew of fifty-one men would have been
lost. As it was, fifteen men were drowned in trying to put off from the
ship on Sunday afternoon.

The St. Cuthbert had had fire smoldering in her hold for several days,
but it was not until she was off Cape Sable that the flames, bursting
from control, showed that the life of the craft was to be measured by
hours. The story of the disaster and rescue was told in fragmentary
wireless dispatches sent from the Cymric to the Marconi wireless station
at Glace Bay.

The Cymric, bound from Queenstown to Boston, under the command of Capt.
Finch, was on her course this morning when a column of smoke was sighted
off her starboard bow, indicating the near presence of a burning vessel.
The Cymric altered her course and stood by the St. Cuthbert.

The flames, which had been working forward from the stern, had driven
the crew forward, and the vessel was making slow progress, her head
against the wind.

The Cymric came close up to windward, and Capt. Finch, hailing Capt. J.
Lewis of the St. Cuthbert, asked him if his boats were in condition to
bring off his own crew.

A high sea was running, and Capt. Lewis, his men exhausted by their long
fight with the flames, feared that they were not equal to the task of
conducting the work of rescue by themselves.

No time was to be lost, for the St. Cuthbert, her men driven from their
posts in the engine room by smoke, lost steering way, and there was
imminent danger of falling off into the sea, so that the high wind would
sweep the deadly fumes over that part of the forward deck where the men
were clustered.

Many had been blistered and partly overcome in their long fight in the
flame-filled hold, and it was indeed doubtful whether, unassisted, they
would have been able to get their own boats over the side.

The heavy sea running at the time made the work of getting the boats
safely into the water a dangerous task. When the seamen pushed off, the
passengers lined the rail and cheered them.

Even pulling with the wind it was a hard task. The small boats had to be
manoeuvred most carefully to the leeward of the burning freighter, and
at times it appeared to those watching from the vessel's side that they
would be swamped in the sea, which was terrific.

Lines cast from the deck of the St. Cuthbert were caught by the men in
the Cymric's small boats, and after much trouble and danger they
succeeded in making them fast.

The injured of the burning liner's crew were lowered down to the men
waiting in the small boats, but before that work had been entirely
carried out the flames had come so close to where the seamen were
working that some of them, without waiting to slide down the rope,
jumped into the sea.

They were picked up by the boats' crews.

There was no accident in the transfer of the shipwrecked men to the
Cymric. The ship's surgeon reports that none of the injured will die.

The last wireless from the Cymric said that the St. Cuthbert was a mass
of flames and probably would founder in a short time. When the Cymric
left her, the flames were sweeping from bow to stern, and the reflection
of the fire lit up the sea for miles.

The St. Cuthbert was one of two boats owned by Rankin, Gilmore & Co.,
Limited, of Liverpool, and running in the service of the Phoenix Line,
which maintains a bi-weekly freight service between Antwerp and New
York.

She sailed from Antwerp on Jan. 20 with a general cargo of merchandise,
and was due In New York to-morrow.
-----
Lloyd B. Sanderson of Sanderson & Son, the local agents of the Phoenix
Line, was informed of the burning of the St. Cuthbert by a reporter for
THE TIMES He said that he had been expecting at any time to hear that
the vessel had been sighted by the marine observer at Fire Island.

He said that the vessel did not carry passengers, and that she was
bringing a general cargo, the value of which he could not state.

The St. Cuthbert was a modern freight carrier, steel hull, single screw,
and with every recent invention for the safe handling of cargo. She was
built by Swan & Hunter shipbuilders of Newcastle, England. She was
launched In September, 1895. She is 400 feet long and of about 7,000
tons.

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Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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MAB Note: The crew member names under both the RESCUED and LOST headings
appeared in two columns in the original, with the column break indicated
here by an asterisk.

The New York Times, 5 February 1908

CYMRIC SAVED 39; BURNED SHIP LOST 14
---
The Times's Wireless Dispatches Supply a Thrilling Picture of the St.
Cuthbert Disaster
---
EXPLOSION FOLLOWED FIRE
---
Survivors Describe Their Terrible Experiences on the Burning
Ship---Heroism of the Imperiled Rescuers
---
By Marconi Wireless Telegraph to THE NEW YORK TIMES
---
ON BOARD THE SS. CYMRIC, off South Wellfleet, Mass., Feb. 4---The
official list of 39 rescued and 14 missing of the steamship St.
Cuthbert, which was burned at sea on Sunday, follows. The rescued are
on board the Cymric, which took them from the burning steamer, as I
described in my dispatches to THE NEW YORK TIMES yesterday.

LIST OF THE RESCUED

LEWIS, JOHN, master, of Tranmere, severely burned.
HOBBS, E. H., chief officer, of Woolton.
LOUHY, D. J., second officer, of Edgehill.
PATTERSON, G. M., chief engineer, of Antwerp.
WALTER, JAMES, chief steward, of Ghent.
BOWMAN, E., apprentice officer, of 320 Ninth Avenue, New York.
JAKOBSEN, ---, West Twenty-third Street, New York, cattleman.
JACKSON, R., Long Island City, cattleman.
KING, W., of Malden, Mass., stowaway.
SPALDING, W., stowaway.
GAYSIDES, ---, of Providence, stowaway.
ROGGERMOSER, FRED, stowaway.
STROICK, A., stowaway.

The Crew

Serus, A. Gallegher, J. Ryan, Patrick. Hanson, Thomas. Rey, Jose.
Schultz, Albert. Olsen, O. Berthing, H. Hancock, E. Wares, A.
Jackie, Joseph. Brogeart, L. Scaeffery, Patrick. * Lamot, Edward. De
Clark, Joseph. Wieckhoist, J. Chardet, W. Schweder, F. Umberto, M.
Jensen, August. Paulopson, J. Brogeart, F. Dosse, G. Jobart, A.
Jorger, J. Ripotnewitz, E.

THE MISSING

WHITE, ---, third officer.
COLLINS, JAMES, San Francisco, stowaway.
Brophy, John. Karlsen, K. Anriena, S. Veremule, M. Defreitis, C.
Steig, B. * Muller, R. Manton, E. Herebont, Y. Voorbruck, J. Van
Pryvabrock, W. R. Kronfeld, I.

The Cymric will probably dock in Boston to-morrow morning.
----------
TOLD BY THE TIMES'S WIRELESS
---
Full Story of the St. Cuthbert---First Sea Disaster Ever So Reported
---
The thrilling story of the burning of the Phoenix Line steamship St.
Cuthbert at sea, 200 miles of Cape Sable, N. S., was told in part in THE
TIMES yesterday morning n a Marconi wireless dispatch from a
correspondent on board the White Star steamship Cymric, which rescued
the Captain and thirty-eight men of the St. Cuthbert's crew of fifty or
more. This correspondent's dispatch was the first news of the disaster
that reached land, and was the first account printed, no other newspaper
in New York yesterday containing a word on the burning of the St.
Cuthbert until after the first edition of THE TIMES was printed. It was
also the first wireless report sent from the scene of a great calamity
at sea, although the transatlantic liners have been equipped with
wireless telegraph for half a dozen years.

THE TIMES correspondent's first dispatch, briefly chronicling the facts,
was received by THE TIMES at 10 o'clock on Monday night. A wireless
message was at once sent to him on the Cymric, 500 miles away, asking
for a detailed report. The correspondent reports that he received this
dispatch at midnight, and at once began sending his narrative from the
tempest-tossed ship. Such portions as were received before 3:30 A. M.
were printed in various editions of yesterday's TIMES. Many graphic
details were received later, and appear below, in conjunction with
portions of the dispatch which appeared only in THE TIMES's latest
editions yesterday morning.

The St. Cuthbert, as will be recalled, was bound from Antwerp for New
York, under the command of Capt. John Lewis. The Cymric, bound from
Queenstown to Boston, came upon the burning steamship, in a tremendous
gale and blinding snowstorm, at 7:30 o'clock on Monday morning, and lay
to for hours unable to offer assistance because of the high seas. The
later portions of THE TIMES correspondent's dispatch continue the
narrative as follows:

The Cymric and Cambrian Stand By

[The following is reprinted from late editions of yesterday's TIMES:]

"The steamship Cambrian, also west-bound, which we passed at daylight,
drew up at noon, and both the Cymric and the Cambrian circled for hours
about the burning vessel seeking the advantage of a position from which
a boat would be protected against the terrible wind and waves.

"The two vessels conversed together and with the St. Cuthbert until 2
o'clock this afternoon when the storm abated somewhat, and the
Cymric decided to lower a boat. Manned by First Officer Stivey and a
crew of six man, who manoeuvered the boat brilliantly, it reached the
St. Cuthbert without mishap and lay on her lee, protected by a copious
use of oil.

Taking Off the Survivors

"Nobody descended for ten minutes. Then a heavy figure was lowered,
followed by another. Then twelve men descended the ladder. Horror
stricken the passengers and crew of the Cymric saw the inmates of the
returning boat, blackened with smoke. Two of the rescued men were
frightfully burned on the face and arms. The bodies of the two
helplessly beat against the ship's side when they were hoisted by a
loop under the arms.

"We dressed their wounds, and meanwhile Capt. Finch ordered the boat
hoisted to secure a better position for a new start. The sufferers
received every care. Their wounds proved happily superficial. Nearly
everybody had the soles of the feet burned, beside bruises.

Daytime Rescue by Searchlight

"Stivey and his crew insisted on completing their task of rescue, though
the others on the St. Cuthbert asked for a chance to save the ship. A
blinding snowstorm was now raging, and the seas were still frightfully
high. Searchlights were rigged and signal flash torches arranged, and
the boat made two more trips, rescuing thirty-seven in all.

"We feared collision or loss of position, and the flashlights and the
foghorn repeatedly restored mutual knowledge of our and their
whereabouts. The boat returned on the last trip at 6:30, half full of
water, having been stove in when she took on her final passengers, as
there was nobody to lend a hand at the ropes above.

[The following was received too late for publication yesterday morning:]

"Fearing the water in the boat would break the ship's stanchions and the
gallant crew would be lost if an attempt were made to haul the boat
aboard, Capt. Finch had the men hauled on deck with lines and ordered
the boat cast adrift. First Officer Stivey, in spite of his arduous
labor lasting four and one-half hours, insisted on standing his regular
watch on the bridge at 8 o'clock to-night.

Fire, Explosion, and Loss of Life

"The St. Cuthbert's officers and crew had a terrible story to relate. At
midnight on Saturday last smoke began to issue from the ventilators of
the ship. The second officer rushed to the bridge to warn the Captain.
At this instant an explosion blew all the forward hatches into the air,
destroyed half the bridge, and set the bridge afire. Poisonous fumes
from the fusel oil, which constituted a large part of the St. Cuthbert's
cargo, drove the helmsman from the wheel. He put the wheel about,
beading the ship to the wind.

"Capt. Lewis fell to the deck frightfully burned and blinded
temporarily. He immediately ordered the junior officers to man the
boats. The cosmopolitan crew, maddened with fear, tugged long at one of
the boats without loosing the braces. The boat, when finally set free,
was smashed in lowering, and all but one or two of the inmates were
drowned, including the third officer. Another was lowered successfully
at 3 o'clock on Sunday morning, and the nine inmates remained in it
until the following afternoon at 4.

Many Stowaways Burned

"The crew rallied and fought the flames desperately for thirty-six
hours. Ships must have passed close during the gale which raged
uninterruptedly, yet none could see them from the St. Cuthbert. The
progress of the fire could only be checked when the steel foremast
melted and crashed across the port rail, precipitating a stowaway from
the crow's-nest into the seething flames beneath. Nine stowaways were
aboard, and several were cut off from the stern and burned to death
helplessly, their cries being faintly heard above the howling wind.

"The St. Cuthbert's cargo was composed of matches, rags, fusel oil,
paraffine, willowware, and other inflammables. These were badly stowed,
causing the St. Cuthbert to list dreadfully, whereby the lowering of the
boats was made hazardous and lives were lost.

"Fortunately, the officers of the Cymric believe, the derelict,
wherefrom smoke was pouring in dense volumes when we sailed away from
the scene, cannot long remain afloat.

"The St. Cuthbert, registered from Liverpool, sailed from Antwerp a
fortnight ago. She was a stout steel vessel of 5,000 tons.

39 Saved; 14. Lost

"The rescued crew and stowaways received on the Cymric to-night medical
assistance and attention, and warm food for the first time since
Saturday. They quickly fell asleep, and were too exhausted to give a
coherent account of the disaster or indicate the names of their last
companions on the list of articled men.

"The final reckoning shows that thirty-nine were saved and fourteen
lost."
----------
MORE DETAILS OF RESCUE
---
Cessation of a Snowstorm Gave the Imperiled Men Their Chance
---
By Marconi Wireless Telegraph to THE NEW YORK TIMES
---
ON BOARD THE SS. CYMRIC, off South Wellfleet, Mass., Feb. 4, 10 P.
M.---Supplementing my dispatches of last night telling of the burning of
the steamer St. Cuthbert and the rescue of thirty-nine men by the
Cymric, I send some further details gathered from the rescued and
rescuers to-day.

Second officer White of the St. Cuthbert lost his life just when it
seemed that he was to be rescued. While the boat of the Cymric was lying
alongside this vessel he was swung out of it on the davits above, but
the davits apparently swayed, and he dropped between the boat and the
ship, and was carried under before he could be caught. Chief Steward
Walter was flung out at the same time, and landed on the deck on his
side.

On board the St. Cuthbert, James Collins, a San Francisco stowaway, was
penned in the forecastle by the flames. He climbed a wire rope and the
stays overhand to the mast Soon afterward he was flung into the seething
hold by the falling mast. The other stowaways remained in the forecastle
until the fire was checked.

Three of the sailors fell into the sea, while clambering aboard half
frozen, after twelve hours' exposure in a boat. Although the order to
lower the boats proved unfortunate, it was natural, considering the
inflammable and explosive nature of the cargo and the uncertainty as to
how long the ship would remain afloat.

Captain Lewis and E. Jobhart were burned at the same time while fighting
the flames. A cask of fusel oil exploded in their faces soon after the
fire was discovered.

The hardships of the officers and crew, who fought the flames for
thirty-six hours on a diet of boiled potatoes, falling into a doze on
the deck for five minutes at a time when they were exhausted, are
matters that one cannot get the sailors to discuss.

"We did what any one would do in fighting for our own lives," they say.

Several of them must go to the hospital owing to burns of the hands and
feet. That sailors can do as much for others' lives as for their own
weal was proved by the officers and crew of the Cymric. The passengers
of this ship have congratulated Capt. Finch and all the men who worked
so bravely and so well, and have felt grateful that we happened to pass
at the critical moment.

We had an exceedingly stormy passage, intersecting two cyclonic areas,
which brought violent changes of temperature, in one case from 72 to 31
degrees Fahrenheit in a few hours. The seas were mountainous, though the
Cymric bore the gales so steadily that the passengers were never
disturbed.

A blinding snowstorm stopped barely in time for us to sight the St.
Cuthbert to the southwest. Of course the joy of the men of the St.
Cuthbert was manifest. Her decks were enlivened by gesticulating
figures. We noticed that she flew a red blanket at her masthead instead
of the conventional colors upside down. The vessel had lost her flags
and signaling apparatus in the flames, and improvised semaphores and
waved vigorously. The men, however, had four hours of anxious waiting
until the practiced eye of Capt. Finch discovered signs of the storm's
abatement.

The danger may be judged from the fact that the lifeboat was invisible
from the promenade deck while proceeding to and from the St. Cuthbert.
Only the thorough drill of the superb crew could have managed the rescue
without an accident or serious injury to any one. The cold was intense.
The invalids among the rescued man are doing well.
----------
THE CYMRIC NEARS BOSTON
---
News Given by The Times--How Two Boats Were Crushed
---
Special to The New York Times
---
BOSTON, Feb. 4---The White Star Line office here received a wireless
message from Capt. Finch of the Cymric this afternoon saying the steamer
probably would reach Boston Lightship about midnight. The weather was
foggy. She probably will not dock till morning.

Only meagre accounts of the rescue were printed in Boston this morning,
and the evening papers were indebted to the account of the affair sent
by wireless from the Cymric to THE NEW YORK TIMES for fuller details of
the wreck and rescue. Great anxiety exists here to learn from the
rescuers and rescued more details of the thrilling scene.

The agent of the Phoenix Line received this afternoon a message saying
that the survivors were in need of clothing.

A wireless dispatch received here to-day tells of the adventures of the
men who put off from the St. Cuthbert in boats before the Cymric was
sighted. Finding the steamer was doomed, two boats were launched at
about 4:30 on Sunday morning, one in charge of Officer Moore, containing
eight men, while the other boat carried members of the crew, said to
have numbered eleven.

Almost immediately after leaving the side of the steamer the second boat
was swamped by a tremendous sea, and all on board were drowned. Officer
Moore's boat drifted away from the steamer, but as the oars had been
either washed away from the boat or broken, the situation was desperate.
Three of the crew of the boat went mad while they were tossing
helplessly about on the waves.

Although the boat was at times half full of water, it remained afloat
through the efforts of the other men of the crew, who bailed
continuously. When daybreak came the St. Cuthbert was seen still afloat
and afire miles away. By stepping the mast and rigging a small sail, the
men of Moore's boat succeeded In returning to the steamer. In rounding
her stern a mountainous wave threw the boat against the steamer's
counter, sinking it and tumbling all the occupants into the water. Lines
were thrown from the steamer to the men, and six were rescued in this
way. The other three were drowned.

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The New York Times, 6 February 1908

CYMRIC BRINGS IN ST. CUTHBERT'S SAVED
---
Capt. Lewis and Five Survivors Were Sent to Boston Hospital
---
THEY WILL ALL RECOVER
---
Seven of the Crew Were Forced Out on to the Anchor by the Flames---There
for Hours
---
Special to The New York Times
---
BOSTON, Feb. 5---Ambulances were in waiting at the Cymric's pier at
Charlestown when the White Star liner and her life savers docked this
afternoon to remove the St. Cuthbert's injured to the relief hospital.

Surgeon D. Young of the liner, who has not slept since the rescue, had
recommended that five of the survivors be taken to the hospital. They
were Capt. Lewis, Chief Engineer Patterson, Herman Joubert, Donkey
Engineer Ernest Olsen, and Seaman Lamat. All their injuries were
principally burns.

Capt. Lewis's condition showed marked improvement, but Joubert's
injuries are serious. Lamat's hip had been burned severely, and Olsen's
feet were also badly burned.

Stories of the fire and rescue to the newspapers were dramatic. Seven
men who were cut off from the after part of the ship were forced as a
last resort to climb out on the anchor. at the bow, where they remained
from 4 o'clock in the morning to 11 o'clock before they were extricated.
When the foremast went overboard the ship's list carried them down, so
that they were in the water part of the time.

Ernest Olsen was the last man to cross the deck over the burning
section. He was barefooted, and the steamer had such a list that his
progress necessarily was slow, while the iron deck was fairly red with
the heat. It will be long before he will be on his feet again.

Two stowaways, cut off, attempted to get aft. One of them, Richard
Spaulding of Malden, succeeded in crawling, hand over hand, along the
rigging, to the ship's funnel; the other, John Collins of San Francisco,
was overcome by the fumes and heat and dropped into the flames.

Seaman Jack Russell of the Cymric was one of the first to volunteer. He
said that the men rather expected there would be a call for volunteers
when the Cymric lay to off the St. Cuthbert waiting for the sea to
moderate.

"We had it sort of fixed," said Russell, "so that the single chaps would
make the first bid..

"By and by back comes Mr. Stivey, first officer, cool as a cucumber as
usual, and said he, very quietly: 'Men, we want to make a try to save
some of those poor fellows on that burning boat. I'm going to take
charge of a boat. Now, who'll go with me?'

"One by one we volunteered and he took our names. More chaps volunteered
than were needed."

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This concludes the NYT reporting of the rescue of St. Cuthbert's crew.

The New York Times, 9 February 1908

MEDALS FOR CYMRIC'S CREW
---
Massachusetts Humane Society to Honor the St. Cuthbert Rescuers
---
Special to The New York Times
---
BOSTON, Feb. 8---The Massachusetts Humane Society to-day voted medals to
Chief Officer John Stively, Boatswain R. Matthews, J. Russell, Robert F.
Jones, M. Blake, J. Redmond, W. Harper, and H. Wilson of the White Star
Steamship [sic] Cymric, which rescued the crew of the St. Cuthbert.

It is thought that action will also be taken by the United States
Government, the British Government, and the steamship company.

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The Times, 8 May 1908

REWARDS FOR BRAVERY---Captain William Finch, R.N R., commander of the
White Star liner Cymric, and Chief Officer John Stivey, R.N.R., were on
Tuesday honoured, at the Liverpool Town-hall, in recognition of the
bravery displayed in the rescue of the crew of 41 from the burning
vessel St. Cuthbert in mid Atlantic during a terrific gale early in
February. On behalf of the Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society the
Lord Mayor (Dr. Caton) presented the captain and chief officer each with
a gold medal, and on behalf of the Shipwrecked Mariners' Society handed
to the commander a pair of binoculars and to the chief officer a gold
medal. The seven men who formed the crew of the lifeboat under Stivey
have previously received from the societies named grants amounting to £8
each and a silver medal. The owners of the St. Cuthbert have presented
the captain and chief officer of the Cymric with solid silver tea
services, and the surgeon (Dr.Young) with ten guineas. On the other side
of the Atlantic the captain and chief officer were, at Boston, made the
recipients of silver loving cups; at New York they received massive gold
medals from the Life Saving Benevolent Society; and at Massachusetts the
chief officer was handed a silver medal, while the men received bronze
medals and $10 each, and at Boston medals and monetary gifts.

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