News from 1909-1910 Mersey's Second Round the World Trip


Mark Baber

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 1 November 1909
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/


NOTABLE TRAINING SHIP
---
MERSEY DUE THIS MORNING

---
The White Star training ship Mersey, now on her second voyage with cadets
from Liverpool to Sydney, was taken in tow by a steam tug off Jervis Bay
at 1 p.m. yesterday, and with the prevailing southerly winds should enter
the port early this morning.

Captain Corner is still in command, and the services of Captain George
Burton---a mariner of 40 years' sea experience, and formerly commander of
the Shaw, Savill, and Albion liner Arawa---have been secured as instructor
to the cadets. The voyage has occupied 108 days.

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Mark Baber

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 2 November 1909
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/


TRAINING SHIP MERSEY
---
ARRIVES HERE FROM LIVERPOOL WITH SIXTY CADETS ON BOARD
---
VISIT TO TRISTAN DA CUNHA

---
The fine clipper ship Mersey, which was purchased some time ago by the White
Star line proprietors for the purpose of training future officers of the
mercantile marine, arrived on another visit to Sydney yesterday from
Liverpool, and after passing the health authorities anchored in Neutral Bay.
There are 60 cadets on board, all of whom have promising careers, and are
spoken of in the highest terms by the commander, instructors, and officers.

This is the second visit of the Mersey as a training ship to this port, and
since she was last here many improvements have been effected. The ship is
now painted white, and presents a very attractive appearance. Bilge keels
have been fitted, ensuring greater steadiness, and the electric light has
been installed throughout the vessel. The quarters of the cadets have been
considerably enlarged, and many other improvements are noticeable.

Leaving Liverpool on July 15, the ship met strong head winds to the Tuskar,
where the tug was cast off. From the Tuskar to Madeira light, variable winds
were encountered, the island being passed on the twelfth day out (July
26). The following day the NE trades set in, but were only moderate, and
failed entirely about 14 deg. N., their places being taken by a strong SW
monsoon. As this shortly developed into a strong head wind, the line was not
crossed till August 20 ---35 days out. The ship crossed in 22deg. W. The SE
trades that ensued were very light, and well from the southward,
consequently the ship was forced over towards the Brazilian coast. After
that she met light, variable winds for a few days, and then a strong breeze.

The island of Tristan da Cunha was sighted on September 11. Here the ship
hove-to for a few hours while two boat loads of natives came off and did a
little bartering, ship's stores, old clothes, etc., being exchanged for
fresh meat and what curios the island affords.

The meridian of the Cape of Good Hope was reached on September 20, moderate
winds and fair weather being met with. The ship ran her easting down in
39deg. S., and St. Paul Island was passed on October 5. The meridian of Cape
Leeuwin was reached on October 14, and the fair breeze continued till the
21st, when it went ahead to eastward. Cape Northumberland was sighted on
the 21st, the Otway on the 24th, and Wilson's Promontory on the 26th, a calm
being encountered in Bass Straits. From Wllson's the winds were baffling and
light to Perpendicular Head, which was reached on Sunday. Here a strong
southerly wind sprang up, and the tug was met. The voyage occupied 108 days.

Captain Corner, R.N R., has associated with him this voyage:-Chief officer,
Mr. G. D. Williams, R.N.R.; first officer, Mr. George Davis; second officer,
Mr. A. Tulloch; head master, Lieut. F. Cross, R.N.R.; assistant master, Mr.
T. C. Gray; and surgeon, Dr. Murray Laffan.

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Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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The Times, 31 May 1910

THE CADET SHIP MERSEY
---
The White Star cadet ship Mersey arrived in the London Docks last night on
the completion of her second voyage to Australia. She left Liverpool on July
15 last, under the command of Lieutenant F. W. Corner, R.N.R., with 60
cadets on board, and arrived at Sydney on November 1. The weather on the
outward voyage was favourable, but head winds prevented a good passage from
being made. On September 11 the Mersey hove-to off the island of Tristan
d'Acunha. The inhabitants sent off two boats to the ship and exchanged some
geese and sheep for a few small stores. The health of the lads has been
excellent throughout. The electric light installed In the vessel proved a
great success.

The Mersey arrived at Newcastle on December 2, and after discharging the
cargo for that port returned to Sydney on December 12. During the Christmas
holidays the ship's agents gave a dance on board at which the boys and 200
guests were present. The demeanour of the cadets was so exemplary in port
that many of them were invited to the houses of leading residents in Sydney.

The return voyage began on January 16, and with favourable weather Cape Horn
was sighted on February 23. The Equator was crossed on April 4, and
thereafter light head winds delayed the Mersey, the voyage from the Equator
occupying 60 days instead of one month. During this time excellent views
were obtained of Halley's Comet, both as a morning and an evening star. The
tail was visible. News of the death of King Edward did not reach the Mersey
until Friday last, when it was signalled by a passing steamer. The blue
ensign was half-masted. The conduct of the cadets on the voyage gave every
satisfaction to the commander, and excellent results were obtained in the
examination on board. The average of the marks obtained in the first
division was about 74 per cent., and in the second division 65 per cent.

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