News from 1911-1912 Mersey's Fourth RoundtheWorld Trip


Mark Baber

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 25 December 1911
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


TRAINING SHIP MERSEY
---
The training ship Mersey (1446 tons) under the command of Captain Corner,
from Liverpool September 20, was towed into Port Jackson late last night,
and anchored in Watson's Bay. During the voyage, which lasted 95 days, the
cadets were given regular instruction both in the schoolroom and on deck in
all subjects necessary for them to pass the Board of Trade examinations.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 December 1911
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


TRAINING SHIP MERSEY
---
Though at one time the people on board the White Star training ship Mersey
hardly expected to reach Sydney for Christmas, yet a spurt of eight days
(from the Leeuwin) at an average dally rate of over 220 miles, and a timely
meeting with the tug just when the wind showed signs of falling light and
going ahead, enabled her to pass through the Heads just before midnight and
as Christmas morning was ushered in the anchor was let go. Captain F. W.
Corner, R.N.R., the commander of the ship, reports:---"We had a good voyage
all round. Leaving Liverpool on September 21, the tug was cast off the
following day off the Tuskar, and after two days' manoeuvring, in adverse
winds, a good offing was obtained. Madeira was passed on October 4, and the
north-east trades were indifferent; thus the line was not crossed till the
27th, when the usual Equator sports were held. The south-east trades were
very good, and the island of Tristan da Cunha was sighted on November 15,
but at a distance; so the Mersey did not stop off the island, as she did two
years ago. The easting was run down in parallel 40 degrees S, and, but for
three poor days near St. Paul Island, would have been very satisfactory. As
it was, an average of over 200 miles daily was made. The longitude of the
Leeuwin was reached on the 16th, and as stated, a really good week's run
brought the ship off Gabo Island on the 23rd. The vessel is fitted with
wireless, and it is interesting to note that a conversation was kept up near
the Equator between the Mersey and the L'Avenir, a Belgian training ship,
and, as far as we know, the only other 'windjammer' fitted with wireless."

Captain Corner has with him the following officers:---Chief, Mr. David
Williams; first, Mr. George Spencer, R.N.R.; second, Mr. L. H. Hardstaff,
R.N.R.;, headmaster, Mr. F. C. Cross, R.N.R.; assistant master, Mr. T. C.
Gray; surgeon, Dr. E. A. Shirvell.

Fifty more cadets are carried on this voyage. The ship will make a fair stay
in Sydney, during which she will load for home round the Horn. She is now
lying in Neutral Bay.

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The Mercury, Hobart, 15 January 1912
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


BOYS FOR THE SEA
---
The pleasing notification has been made by Captain E. E. [sic; should be
"F.W."] Corner, R.N.R., commander of the White Star training ship Mersey,
that the White Star line has decided to receive applications from boys of
Australia who wish to go to sea, as cadets on the vessel named. It appears
that on the last occasion the Mersey was in Sydney harbour the captain had a
number of applications to serve as cadets, which, under the then existing
conditions, had to be refused. For many boys the sea has the same
fascination as it has had from time immemorial, but how very different are
the conditions nowadays from those existing a century ago! With regard to
the training of the cadets on the Mersey (there are now 60 boys on board),
the wireless installation is said to have caused a great deal of interest
among the youngsters, a large percentage of whom become proficient in its
use. On the voyage out from England to Sydney a paper was printed on board
in English, French, and German, and through the medium of communication with
the Marconi station at Cornwall, the news of the world was given daily, a
special feature, of course, being the latest from the scene of the war
between Italy and Turkey.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 16 February 1912
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


AT HOME ON THE MERSEY
---
One of the finest social functions on board ship in Sydney Harbour took
place last night on the White Star training ship Mersey, which was lying at
Dalgety's Wharf, Miller's Point. The line of route from below the main shed
was festooned with electric stars and lights, while bunting was displayed
profusely. Motor cars and other vehicles brought guests to the number of
over 200, who were catered for in a most hospitable manner between the
intervals of dancing. Captain F. W. Corner and Mrs. Corner received the
guests, and extended them a cordial welcome. They were ably assisted in the
course of the evening by the officers of the ship---Lieut. Spencer, R.N.R.,
Lieut. Hardstaff, R.N.R., Lieut. Cross, R.N.R., and Dr. Shirvell. The big
shed alongside the wharf was specially decorated for the supper. The guests
were invited at the instance of the commander and officers of the ship, in
conjunction with Dalgety and Co., Ltd.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 17 February 1912
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


SOCIAL
---
***
An important social function took place on Thursday evening last, when the
commander and officers of the White Star training ship Mersey and Messrs.
Dalgety and Co., entertained about 250 guests at a most enjoyable "at home"
on board the vessel. The ship, which is lying at Dalgety and Co.'s wharf,
Miller's Point, was brilliantly illuminated from stem to stern with coloured
electric lights, and decorated with many flags, chiefly those of the White
Star Company. Refreshments were served in the dining saloon, and supper at
long tables in one of the sheds on the wharf. An excellent band was in
attendance, and a programme of dances was carried through, concluding at
midnight. The guests were received at the head of the gangway by Commander
and Mrs. Corner and Mr. Richards, who were assisted throughout the evening
by the officers of the ship---Lieutenant Spencer, R.N.R., Lieutenant
Hardstaff, R.N.R., Lieutenant Cross, R.N.R., and Dr. Shirvell. Among the
guests were Captain Holleston, Mrs. Corner (wearing a becoming gown of creme
ninon and gold embroidered lace with creme satin), Mrs. T. F. Knox (in black
net embroidered with jet and cut steel over black charmeuse), Miss Nell
Knox, Mrs. Day (Adelaide), Mrs. Scot-Skirving, Mrs. Wade, Mrs. Rennie, Mrs.
Alfred Bray, Miss Betty Bray, Mrs. Frank Brennan, Mrs. L. J. Davies, Mrs.
Stanley Lambton, Mrs. Staunton Spain, Miss Dorothy Galbraith, Miss Tates,
the Misses A. and F. Brennan, Miss J. Chalon, Mr. T. F. Knox, Dr.
Scot-Skirving, Dr. Rennie, Mr. Stanley Lambton, Dr. and Mrs. Sparke, Mr. L.
J. Davies, Captain, Mrs., and the Misses Lloyd (2), Mr. French (Dalgety and
Co.), Misses Willis (2), Mr. Arthur Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Gaffney, Miss
Bracegirdle, Miss Mann, Mr., Mrs., and Miss M'Kenzie, Mr. and Mrs. D. Spain,
Mr. Frank Brennan, Mr., Mrs., and Miss Reeks, Misses Upton (2), Paymaster
Rogers, R.N., Captain Carron, R.N., Misses Playfair (2), Mr. Raymond, Mr.
Garnett, Mr. Mrs., and Miss Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Fitzhardinge, Misses Hudson,
Dr. and Misses Metcalfe, Miss Wood, Captain Summers, and many others,
including several naval officers.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 23 July 1912
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper


SURGERY AT SEA
---
On the fourth Australian voyage of the training ship Mersey, which has just
arrived in London, an operation for appendicitis during a gale was
necessitated by the acute illness of one of the cadets while the ship was
rounding Cape Horn. It was a matter of life or death, so the surgeon, Dr
Shirvell, called a consultation, and appointed the headmaster, Lieutenant
Cross, to the office of anaesthetist, the first and second officers, Messrs.
Spencer and Hardstaff, being selected as assistants to pass the bandages,
and one of the cadets to hold the tray of sterilised instruments.

During the operation Captain Corner's presence of mind prevented what
must have proved a fatal issue. The boy holding the instrument tray
suddenly fainted, and the captain jumped in time to catch the tray. The
operation was a complete success.

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