News from 1913: Maiden voyage of Ceramic

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Evening News, Sydney, 20 September 1913
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
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Social Items
---
Events of the Week
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VICE-REGAL

---
***
The Governor, accompanied by the Misses Strickland, and attended by General
Finn, paid a visit of inspection to the steamer Ceramic on Monday afternoon,
at the invitation Messrs. Dalgety and Company, Limited.
***

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The Sunday Times, Sydney, 21 September 1913
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SHIPS OF PROGRESS
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CERAMIC JUMPS INTO POPULARITY AS PASSENGER AND CARGO VESSEL
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THE ADMIRAL'S PRAISE

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During the week Sydney people have been interested in three new steamers,
namely, the Ceramic, the Katoomba, and the Barrenjoey. There is variety in
the three ships, making the subject all the more important from our own
standpoint. Thousands have visited the Ceramic, and are amazed to find that
it is possible to go Home in such a roomy ship at a minimum of £19, while
accommodation up to £30 is also available. The trip by the Cape under such
conditions is made attractive, and if inquiries for berths is any criterion,
the Ceramic will leave Australia a full ship. So far as cargo is concerned,
all the space has been sold out. The Admiral, when he went on board the
ship, was given an opportunity of watching the gun crew at work. His
Excellency was pleased with the exhibition, and complimented Commander
Stivey, R.N.R., on the efficiency of the men. The Ceramic will be open to
the public again this afternoon.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, 23 September 1913
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WHITE STAR LINE
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"AT HOME" ON THE CERAMIC
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AN ENTERPRISE DESERVING OF REWARD

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The decks and social rooms of the huge White Star liner Ceramic were the
scene of a very enjoyable "at home" given yesterday afternoon by Commander
Stivey, R.N.R., and Messrs. Dalgety and Co., Ltd., agents for the line.

The numerous guests were received at the head of the gangway by Commander
Stivey, Mr. H. Y. Braddon, and Mr. H. W. Richards. After a general
inspection of the vessel had been made by the guests refreshments were
provided in the dining saloon.

During the afternoon a number of prominent citizens, met in the
smoking-room, where, after the loyal toast had been honoured, the Lord Mayor
(Alderman A. A. C. Cocks) proposed the toast of "Success to the White Star
Line." The Lord Mayor referred to the great size of the Ceramic, and said
that he had been informed that on the voyage out via the Cape the vessel had
averaged 16 knots per hour from port to port. This, he thought, was a very
satisfactory average. Travellers by mail steamers 25 years ago would have
been very pleased to have averaged anything like it.

"The Ceramic," continued the Lord Mayor, "is a vessel of 18,471 tons, or
4000 tons in excess of the largest ship which has previously entered this
harbour. Whilst I think she will bear comparison in every way, she is fitted
up not for £80 and £100 passengers, but for passenger accommodation from £18
to £20 odd from port to port on a voyage of 49 days. The whole of her decks
are free to passengers." He thought they should add a word of compliment to
the members of the Harbour Trust, who had made it possible to berth such a
ship as the Ceramic right alongside the city. It spoke well for the work
they had done, and showed that they were ready to seize every opportunity
for the betterment of the trade of the port. He trusted that the White Star
line would be amply rewarded for its enterprise in being the pioneer of such
magnificent tonnage in steamers. The vessel was not built on philanthropic
lines, but on the lines of supply and demand, and it was satisfactory to
know that such a ship could be built and sent out here with reasonable and
sound grounds for her success.

Commander Stivey replied briefly, expressing thanks for the toast which had
been moved by "the first citizen of the finest city in Australia."

The guests then inspected the two guns fitted at the stern of the vessel by
the Admiralty, after which they wandered about the spacious decks for the
remainder of the afternoon, while a band on board played a number of
selections.

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Mark Baber

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MAB note: Ceramic began her maiden return trip on 24 September 1913 from
Sydney. She was at Melbourne from 26 September to 1 October; and arrived
Adelaide on 3 October.


The Argus, Melbourne, 29 September 1913
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SHIPPING NOTES

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Thousands of people visited Port Melbourne yesterday to see the mammoth
White Star steamer Ceramic, the largest vessel that has yet visited
Australia. Before 4 o'clock the vessel was crowded with sightseers, and the
overflow made the trip to Williamstown, where the H.M.A.S. Encounter (in dry
dock) and the Antarctic exploration barquentine Aurora were objects of
interest.

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MAB notes: 1. Continuing the return leg of her maiden voyage, Ceramic left
Adelaide on 4 October 1913. 2. The last sentence of the second paragraph,
which I don't quite understand, is as it appears in the original.


The Mail, Adelaide, 4 October 1913
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A HUGE STEAMER
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THE CERAMICS FIRST VOYAGE

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The huge White Star liner Ceramic left the Outer Harbour at dusk to-night
well laden for South Africa and the old country. The Ceramic is a 33 per
cent. larger boat than the previous largest steamer which pulled into the
Outer Harbour. It is only a few months ago that the Nestor, of 14,500 tons,
took the record. The Ceramic measures 18,481 tons, though she is
comparatively small compared with the 50.000-ton liners which the White Star
and other companies have in the Atlantic service. It is a wonderful thing
when you come to think of it that a steamer of such enormous proportion has
been put on the Australian trade. On Friday afternoon, by the invitation of
Messrs. Dalgety & Co., Limited, a large number of representative business
men went to the Outer Harbour in a special train and inspected the steamer.
Owing to the opening of the new railway to the Murray country, the produce
from which will help to fill steamers like the Ceramic, His Excellency the
Governor and Ministers of the Crown were unable to be present. The visitors
spent an exceedingly interesting half-hour inspecting the wonderful
improvements which have been effected in this modern mammoth cargo carrier,
not only in the facilities for handling cargo but in the direction of
passenger accommodation, in improved cabin comforts for travellers, and in
facilities for making their voyage as enjoyable as possible. After the
inspection the company gathered in the saloon, and a few toasts were
honoured.

The visitors were welcomed by Mr. E. W. van Senden. representing Dalgety and
Co., who in his remarks referred to the remarkable growth of the Australian
trade. He pointed out how the expansion of business had made it necessary
for larger steamers to be put in the trade, and the Ceramic was the last
word in this direction. The company was confident that its enterprise would
be appreciated and rewarded, and had no doubt that, as had happened before,
that five years would still prove to be the life in this particular trade of
the most modern steamer to enter upon it.

Mr. Arnold E. Davy (President of the Chamber of Manufactures) proposed the
toast of the White Star Company. It was exceedingly gratifying that private
enterprise was able to put into the trade such a magnificent steamer as they
had inspected that afternoon, and when private enterprise could do this was
it necessary that it should be unduly interfered with? They wished the White
Star Company the greatest possible success, and believed that if enterprise
was to be rewarded before long even larger steamers than the Ceramic would
be necessary to cope with the rapidly growing trade of Australia.

Capt. Stivey, R.N.R., responded on behalf of the company. He was glad they
appreciated the qualities of the Ceramic. He knew her to be a fine boat, one
no larger than the trade warranted, and he believed that she would only be
the beginning of a long line of even larger steamers.

Sir Charles Goode also spoke on behalf of the visitors, and wished the White
Star Company every success. That success was deserved by the enterprise that
was shown in bringing to Port Adelaide such a magnificent steamer. He had
seen the trade of Australia grow from very small things in the last 70
years, but he had no doubt about the future of this continent. It was
gratifying to know that a company like the White Star Company could see a
brilliant future for Australia, and was anxious to participate in the
development.

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The West Australian, Perth, 9 October 1913
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WHITE STAR LINER CERAMIC
---
Albany, Oct. 8

The White Star liner Ceramic arrived from the Eastern States at 11.30 last
night, loaded a quantity of flour, wool, tallow, and skins, and sailed for
London at 7 this morning. Passengers:---Inward: Mesdames Bott, Head, Moore
and infant, Rocke and two children, Watson (2), Pederick, Traynor and
infant; Miss Watson; Messrs. McCormack, Roka, Watson, Whyte, Pederick,
Outward: Mesdames Stewart and two children, Butter, Gordan, Howe, Bow, Jones
and infant; Misses Herne, Wilding, Butter (3), Thriscott; Messrs. Bray,
Stewart, Braine, Gordon, Howe, Bell, Strother, Mackay, Holt, Mouncey,
Addison, Hallahan, Geres, Master Butter.

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MAB note: This concludes the reporting of Ceramic's maiden voyage.

The Sydney Morning Herald, 18 November 1913
Retrieved from the National Library of Australia web site,
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CERAMIC AT LONDON
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Messrs. Dalgety and Co., Ltd., have received advice of the arrival of the
new White Star liner Ceramic at London on Thursday last. The maiden voyage
from Adelaide to London, via South Africa, of this vessel has been
accomplished in the very satisfactory time of 40 days, including calls at
Albany, Durban, Capetown, and Plymouth.

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Oops! I missed this one, it seems

.
The Times, London, 13 November 1913

THE WHITE STAR LINER CERAMIC
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COMPLETION OF MAIDEN VOYAGE

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The new White Star triple-screw steamer Ceramic of 18,431 tons, the largest
vessel in the Australian trade, which left Liverpool for the Antipodes on
July 24 arrived at Plymouth yesterday morning, and may be expected to
complete her maiden voyage by arriving in the Thames to-day. She will be the
largest merchantman ever seen in the Port of London.

On the outward voyage the liner had a cordial reception at various ports of
call. A mayoral reception was given to the commander and officers at Albany;
the ship was thrown open to the public at Melbourne, and was visited by the
Hon. W. A. Watt, Premier of Victoria. At Sydney, an opportunity was also
afforded to the public to become acquainted with the passenger
accommodation. The two 4.7 guns which were placed on the ship under the new
Admiralty scheme attracted inspection not only from the ordinary visitors
but from Admiral Sir George King-Hall, who went on board.

The White Star Line, it may be pointed out, not only possesses in the
Ceramic the largest steamer in the Australian trade, but the Laurentic is
the largest dispatched to Canada; the Athenic has the greatest tonnage of
any vessel trading to New Zealand; whilst the Olympic is the largest British
steamer afloat. The average tonnage per steamer of the White Star fleet,
exceeds that of any other shipping company---British or foreign.

The Ceramic is expected to remain in Tilbury Dock for a few days, and is
expected to discharge between 5,000 and 6,000 tons of general cargo,
consisting of wool, tallow, skins, and other Colonial produce, and also
about 1,300 tons of frozen meat and a considerable quantity of butter.
Subsequently the vessel will proceed to Liverpool to discharge the rest of
her cargo.

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