News from 1913: Olympic Returns to Service


Mark Baber

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The New York Times, 10 April 1913

OLYMPIC, DONE OVER, ONCE MORE IN PORT
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Fitted with an Inner Skin and Longitudinal Bulkheads Which Make Her Steady Under Way
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$1,250,000 FOR REPAIRS
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New Parisian Restaurant---English Commissioners for Anglo-American Exposition Aboard
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After more than six months in Harland & Wolff's shipyard, in Belfast, getting fitted with an inner skin and longitudinal bulkheads at a cost of $1,250,000, the White Star liner Olympic arrived in port yesterday from Southampton again in command of Capt. H. J. Haddock. She carried 1,553 passengers. Of this number, 242 were first, 231 second, and 1,080 third class passengers.

The passengers spoke well of the steadiness of the Olympic, and the Surgeon, J. C. H. Beaumont, who is known as the "Caruso" of the Atlantic, said that a great deal was due to the extra weight of the additional bulkheads and double skin, which increased the tonnage from 43,324 to 46,358.

In addition to the alterations below decks, the Olympic has a new Parisian restaurant, where epicures can eat at moderate prices, and also a Winter garden, which can be used on the finest day in mid-Summer, or the stormiest in Winter.

This does not in any way interfere with the veranda cafe on the after part of the upper promenade deck. The inconvenience of carrying up dishes from the saloon galley to the Parisian restaurant, which was the cause of dishes being cold before the Olympic went to Belfast, in the Fall, has been obviated by the construction of a galley on the forepart of the restaurant, so that the dishes can be handled from the stove.

Two of the oldest employees of the White Star Line made the trip on the Olympic from Southampton, and enjoyed the experience, Thomas R. Thorne, head of the Mediterranean service in the first class department, and John N. Smith, gateman. Both have been in the service of the company for 35 years. Mr. Smith, who made his first trip to his native land in 40 years, was received at the pier by all the old employees of the line. They gave him a parting serenade with the firemen's kettle and bones band.

The Olympic is still the largest passenger liner afloat, and gives the idea of her immensity to those who go on board and try to find some one without knowing exactly where to look. She is so big that passengers crossing on her rarely explore all the decks in the first cabin. Two old friends, both from Chicago, met at the pier yesterday for the first time in two years without being aware that they had been fellow voyagers from Cherbourg to New York.

Among the passenger was William Church Osborne, an old friend of President Wilson, who has been spending some time in Spain studying its municipal market systems. Mr. Osborne said that he found the Spanish methods of public markets to be much better than those employed in New York.

Another passenger was Mrs. Margaret S. Blood, whose husband is a Director of the Berwind-White Coal Company, and in consequence several tugs belonging to the company met the Olympic at Quarantine and escorted her up the harbor, emitting joyous toots. John Bartholomew, victualing superintendent of the White Star Line at Southampton, who was chief steward of the Oceanic years ago when she was the late J. Pierpont Morgan's favorite ship, arrived on the Olympic. W. Jones from the Adriatic is now the chief steward of the Olympic.

Albert and Charles Kiralfy, Deputy Commissioners of the Anglo-American Exposition, which is to be held in London from May to October in 1914, in celebration of the hundred years' peace between English-speaking nations since the treaty of Ghent in 1814, were also on the Olympic. They are stopping at the Plaza, as advance guards of a further deputation of the English Committee, which will arrive next week under the Earl of Kintore, former Australian Governor and Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Exposition.

The English deputation, the two Deputy Commissioners said, was coming here at the suggestion of the Lord Mayor of London, to confer with the American Committee.

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Remco Hillen

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Dec 13, 1999
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Hello Mark,

Thanks for this artical, interesting read.

There's a thing I wonder about, see the following quote:

In addition to the alterations below decks, the Olympic has a new Parisian restaurant, where epicures can eat at moderate prices, and also a Winter garden, which can be used on the finest day in mid-Summer, or the stormiest in Winter.

This does not in any way interfere with the veranda cafe on the after part of the upper promenade deck.

A Winter Garden? Besides the Verandah Cafe and the Cafe Parisien? I haven't heard of that before on Olympic; although I know some Cunarders had features with such a name. I always assumed a Winter Garden was the same as a Verandah Cafe; but just with a different name.

Just wondering about that; I don't know too much of all the changes that were applied to Olympic during her long career!

Regards,
Remco
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Remco,

I wondered about that quote too. I know that the D deck reception room was also referred to as the winter garden, but judging by the weather description, I assume they're still referring to the Cafe Parisien. Other than that, there are no candidates for such a room (other than the Palm Courts on A deck, like you said).

Daniel.
 

Mark Baber

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The Sun, New York, 20 February 1913
Original article digitized by the New York Public Library
Retrieved from the Library of Congress' Chronicling America web site,
chroniclingamerica.loc.gov


"NEW" OLYMPIC NEARLY READY
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Big Liner, Refitted, Will Leave Southampton April 2
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Special Cable Despatch to THE SUN

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Belfast, Feb. 19---The big triple screw White Star liner Olympic, which has
been in the graving dock here for four months and on which 4,000 men have
been working day and night at a cost of over a million dollars, was towed
to-day to a deep water wharf, where a forward funnel will be placed in her,
after which she will sail for Southampton. She will leave there for New York
on April 2 and is scheduled to leave New York on her return trip on April
12.

Great changes have been made in this big boat since the Titanic disaster.
She has been fitted with double sides and additional watertight bulkheads
which extend from the bottom to the top of the ship. She has also been
equipped with full boatage capable of accommodating all her passengers and
crew.

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