News from 1924 Bardic Aground at the Lizard


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The Times, 1 September 1924

The Times, 1 September 1924

WRECK AT THE LIZARD
---
WHITE STAR LINER ON THE ROCKS

---
Lloyd's Agent at the Lizard telegraphed yesterday that the British
steamer Bardic, bound from Sydney and Liverpool for London, had stranded
about one mile south of the Lizard Lighthouse and later that the
captain, officers, and crew were safely ashore. Subsequently it was
announced that the captain, officers, and engineers had returned on
board to keep up steam. A dense fog had cleared. The ship was not
carrying passengers.

Further reports showed that the Bardic struck Maenheere Rock at 1.30
a.m. yesterday and remained fast. The vessel was reported to be holed in
holds No. 1, 2, and 3, and be down by the head and grinding. The tugs
Dandy and Triton stood by for some time and then returned to Falmouth.
The cargo of the Bardic consisted of wool; grain, frozen meat, and lead.
The London insurance market is likely to be considerably interested in
the consignments.

The Bardic is a steamer of 7,960 tons gross, built by Harland and Wolff
in 1919, and owned by the White Star Line. For some time she was
employed in the North Atlantic trade.

On March 17, 1907, the White Star liner Suevic went ashore near the
Lizard, while bound from Sydney, N.S.W., for Plymouth and London. the
passengers and crew being safely landed. Subsequently the vessel broke
in two, and the stern portion was salved and towed to Southampton. A new
bow, built at Belfast, was added, and the Suevic, in her new form, was
rather longer than when she was originally built.

[Separate article]

CITY NOTES
---
The Stranding of a Liner
---
The neighbourhood of the Lizard has been the scene of some costly
wrecks, and that of the White Star liner Bardic, which occurred
yesterday, promises to take its place among the number. The Bardic
sailed from Sydney on July 6 and arrived at Liverpool on Tuesday last,
August 26, which, after the part discharge of cargo, she left again on
Friday. From the underwriting point of view, it is fortunate that at the
time of the stranding, which appears to have taken place in a dense fog,
she was not a full ship, but Lloyd's agent telegraphs that she had on
board at the time wool, grain, frozen meat, and lead. Even a part cargo,
made up of such consignments, of a ship of her size---the Bardic is of
nearly 8,000 tons gross---is apt to represent large sums of money, and
the wreck is likely to monopolize much attention in the London marine
insurance market to-day.

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The Times, 2 September 1924

The Times, 2 September 1924

The Stranding of the Bardic
---
News of the stranding of the White Star liner Bardic off the Lizard was
received by London underwriters yesterday morning with a quotation of 80
per cent. for reinsurance to cover the risk of total loss. Subsequently
the rate declined to 70 per cent., and there were those who were
inclined to think that the vessel might be refloated. It was noted that
the famous salvage steamer Ranger, belonging to the Liverpool and
Glasgow Salvage Association, had left Liverpool late on Sunday night for
the scene of the stranding, and that the salvage tug Trover had sailed
from Southampton earlier in the day for the wreck. The Bardic is
understood to have been insured for £170,000, and, as was indicated
yesterday would be the case, the London market is much interested in the
fate of the valuable cargo from Australia remaining in the vessel after
consignments had been discharged at Liverpool last week. In view of the
frozen meat on board, a message from Falmouth stating that the
temperature was being maintained satisfactorily was important.

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The Times, 3 September 1924

The Times, 3 September 1924

Lower Rate on the Bardic
---
The rate to reinsure the British liner Bardic, ashore at the Lizard,
declined yesterday further from 70 to 60 per cent. on reports that the
prospects of salving the vessel are very fair, although entirely
dependent on the weather. No doubt every possible effort will be made to
refloat the ship and take her into Falmouth, where there are excellent
repairing facilities. In the meantime arrangements are being made to
discharge sound cargo into coasting craft, and it was expected that last
night a small steamer would leave the wreck for London with from 800 to
1,000 bales of wool.

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The Times, 4 September 1924

The Times, 4 September 1924

MARINE INSURANCE
---
WOOL SALVED FROM THE BARDIC
---
On a report respecting the condition of the White Star liner BARDIC,
ashore at the Lizard, the reinsurance rate against the risk of total
loss hardened yesterday from 60 to 65 per cent. Sound bales of wool to
the number 926 are reported to have been salved. It was hoped that
divers would be at work yesterday.

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The Times, 5 September 1924

The Times, 5 September 1924

CASUALTY REPORTS
(FROM LLOYD'S)
---
*** Falmouth, Sept. 4.-Steamer BARDIC----discharge continued yesterday.
Steamer CORNISH TRADER arrived here and landed quantity frozen meat.
Master of Cornish Trader reports on going alongside Bardic yesterday
morning sustained damage to stem, bow plate dented, hawsepipe started,
belting damaged, &c. Tug TROVER, also alongside, had belting damaged.

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The Times, 9 September 1924

The Times, 9 September 1924

MARINE INSURANCE
---
HIGHER RATE ON THE BARDIC
---
A report yesterday respecting the stranding of the White Star liner
BARDIC at the Lizard stated that, owing to bad weather, salvage vessels
had only been able to go alongside on Sunday for short periods.
Considering the heavy sea running on Sunday night, the vessel yesterday
was fairly quiet, although there was a slight increase in the "set-up"
in the machinery space. Yesterday morning, in consequence of a strong
south-westerly wind and rough sea, no craft could approach the vessel.
The reinsurance rate advanced yesterday from 65 to 70 per cent.

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The Times, 10 September 192

The Times, 10 September 1924

Insurance and Shipping Losses
---
Reports of the attempts to salve the White Star liner Bardic, ashore at
the Lizard, continue to be followed with close interest by underwriters,
while the market view of the prospects of refloating the vessel is
indicated by a reinsurance rate of as much as 75 per cent. against the
risk of total loss. This rate is higher than was quoted at the beginning
of the month, but the operations are known to have been handicapped by
unfavourable weather. The reports have caused underwriters to feel
convinced that everything practicable is being done to save the ship,
and already a considerable quantity of cargo has been salved, in spite
of difficulties due to rough sea. Although the wreck of the Bardic is
the most important casualty now before the London market, there are a
number of other shipping casualties reported which may prove costly[,
but which have been omitted from this transcription as irrelevant].

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The Times, 17 September 192

The Times, 17 September 1924

MARINE INSURANCE
---
Reports from the BARDIC, ashore near the Lizard, show that the frozen
meat is now being salved and appears to be in fairly good condition.
Work on the salvage of the vessel is said to be progressing
satisfactorily. A heavy sea was, however, running on Monday night. The
re-insurance rate has now fallen to 65 guineas.

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The Times, 24 September 192

The Times, 24 September 1924

Marine Insurance
---
Underwriters are beginning to express some anxiety regarding the
position of the White Star liner BARDIC, ashore near the Lizard. The
heavy weather which has prevailed during the last few days has caused a
cessation in salving the cargo; and until further progress is made in
this direction it is impossible to estimate the extent of the damage to
the vessel. The hull is insured in the London market on a value of
£170,000, and the rate for reinsurance rose yesterday to 70 guineas per
cent.

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The Times, 27 September 192

The Times, 27 September 1924

MARINE INSURANCE
---
Reports from the stranded White Star liner BARDIC show that salvage
operations have been recommenced and that more wool, most of it in good
condition, has been discharged. A favourable report concerning the
condition of the vessel's hull has resulted in the reinsurance rate
falling to 60 guineas per cent.

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The Times, 29 September 192

The Times, 29 September 1924

MARINE INSURANCE
---
News was received from Lloyd's yesterday that the BARDIC, which was
ashore near the Lizard, had been refloated with the help of the salvage
tug TROVER and Falmouth tugs DANDY VICTOR, TRITON, and PERRAN. The
salvage steamer RANGER was said to be in attendance, and heading for
Falmouth.

The BARDIC was later reported passing Coverack yesterday afternoon. It
was added that three tugs were towing the vessel and two steering her,
and that she had a heavy list to port. On Saturday the reinsurance rate
fell to 50 guineas per cent.
***
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The Times, 30 September 192

The Times, 30 September 1924

MARINE INSURANCE
---
ARRIVAL OF THE BARDIC AT FALMOUTH

---
Considerable satisfaction is expressed in reinsurance circles with
respect to the salvage of the BARDIC. The size of this vessel, her
precarious situation, and the continued bad weather made operations as
difficult as possible. Great credit is, therefore, due to the Liverpool
and Glasgow Salvage Association, and its officers, Commanders Kay and
Dathan. The report that she has a heavy list indicates that she has
received considerable damage, which was expected, but her insured value
of £170,000 is high and will go some way towards minimizing the claim on
her hull. It is also satisfactory to note that much of the cargo has
been salved in good condition, some of the wool being undamaged, while
even the frozen meat has, in some cases, proved marketable, even as late
as the last few days.

A Lloyd's message received yesterday after business hours stated that
the BARDIC had arrived at Falmouth in tow and accompanied by the RANGER,
and that she was berthed on a mud bank in a safe position.

***

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MAB Note:

MAB Note: This concludes the reporting of Bardic's grounding, but this series will resume in several weeks.

The Times, 6 October 1924

THE BARDIC IN DRY DOCK
---
NEED OF HEAVY REPAIRS

---
The Bardic was successfully dry-docked at Falmouth on Friday after
having been ashore at the Lizard for exactly a month. During the passage
to Falmouth the ship had proceeded at eight knots with the starboard
engine alone working---at 30 revolutions a minute---and with the
assistance of tugs.

When an examination of the hull was made by representatives of the
owners and underwriter, salvage experts, and shipyard officials, it was
found that the port side of the vessel, with the internal structure, was
damaged for almost the entire length. The starboard side was also shown
to be seriously damaged, but was not in such a bad state as the port
side. The forefoot of the vessel was found to be destroyed, the rudder
was bent, the port engine shafting was set up, and both propellers were
damaged.

The serious condition of the bottom indicated the necessity of heavy
repairs and also tended to show that the refloating of the vessel had
been a remarkable one.

About 2,000 tons of cargo were understood to remain in the ship,
including grain, lead, and frozen beef and rabbits.

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MAB Note:

MAB Note: The New York Times' report of this incident gives Graeme's age as 49 (not 29 as reported here) and says not that he was on leave, but that he had resigned after Bardic's grounding "after the custom of British shipmasters when they make a mistake."

The Times, 4 November 1924

TRAIN SMASH IN LANCASHIRE
---
EXPRESS DERAILED
---
MANY KILLED AND INJURED

---
(FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT)
---
MANCHESTER, Nov. 3
---
The 4.40 p.m. train from Liverpool to Lytham and Blackpool was wrecked
to-night at Moss Side, between Kirkham and Lytham, at about 5.20. The
train was derailed, came into collision with a signal-box, which was set
on fire, and afterwards overturned. Many passengers were buried under
the wreckage, and it is feared there has been a heavy loss of life.

So far five bodies have been recovered and placed in a room at Lytham
Station to await identification. It is feared that seven or eight other
persons have been killed, but their bodies have not yet been recovered.
The persons identified so far are:-

KILLED
Miss Emma Pickup (48), weaver, 4, Park-road, Lytham.

Miss Isa Greenwood (21). weaver, 30, Thames-road, South Shore,
Blackpool.

Miss Annie Greenwood (29), weaver, of the same address, and sister of
Isa Greenwood.

Thomas Hartley, 10, Montrose-avenue, Blackpool
(identified from papers in his possession).

---- Crookes, Blackpool, the engine-driver.

INJURED

H. Oldham, 107, St. Hilliers-road, Blackpool, injuries to legs and arms.

R. A. Hall, All Saints-road, St. Anne's, shock and injuries.

Mrs. Richardson, 14, Eaves-road, Blackpool, injuries to head and back.

Mr. Hornby, signalman, Kirkham-road, Blackpool, cuts and bruises.

Frank Livingstone, Cunliffe-road, Blackpool, head injuries.

Lettie Herbert, Albert-road, Blackpool, head injuries.

Mr. Graham, Leakon-road, Blackpool, leg injuries.

Mrs. Ellen Wright.

Charles Graeme (29), Lincoln-road, Blackpool, commander of the White
Star steamship Bardic.

H. Holden, Blackpool, leg and arm injuries.

Mrs. Elliott, Lytham-road, South Shore, Blackpool, leg injuries.

Captain Mark Shaffer, J.P., of Blackpool, cuts on face and head, and
shock.

[Several paragraphs describing the location and details of the wreck
have been omitted.]

One of the injured passengers was Commander Green , R.N., [sic;
this is almost certainly a reference to Capt. Greame, as will become
evident tomorrow] who was on leave and travelling to Blackpool.
Both of his feet were injured, and one had to be amputated.

[Four more paragraphs omitted.]

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MAB Note:

MAB Note: This concludes the reporting of Bardic's wreck and the death
of Capt. Graeme.

The Times, 5 November 1924

MOSS SIDE TRAIN WRECK
---
DEATH ROLL OF 13
---
THE KING'S MESSAGE

---
The chairman of the London Midland and Scottish Railway (Sir William Guy
Granet) yesterday received the following telegram and conveyed it to all
concerned:-

"The King has learned with deep concern of the serious accident at Moss
Side last evening and asks that an expression of his regret and sympathy
may be conveyed to the families of those who have lost their lives or
who were injured. Please send any further details for his Majesty's
information.-STAMFORDHAM"
-----
(FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT)
---
PRESTON, Nov. 4.
---
The full extent of the railway disaster at Moss Side, near Lytham,
yesterday evening only became clear early this morning, when the body of
William Charles Crookes, the driver of the ill-fated Liverpool to
Blackpool express, was recovered from the soil beneath the wrecked
engine, where it was deeply embedded. Not until the locomotive as well
as the tender had been lifted by a crane was it possible to place beyond
doubt the fate of the driver, though his complete disappearance from the
moment of the disaster suggested that the worst had happened to him. The
full list of identified dead is as follows:-

COMMANDER C. H. GREAME, 29, Lincoln-road, Blackpool.

EMMA PICKUP, 48, single, weaver, 4, Park-road, Lytham.

MARGARET PICKUP, 56, single, same address.

WILLIAM CHARLES CROOKES, enginedriver, 67, Buchanan-street, Blackpool.

WILLIAM WALSH,. 33, married, weaver, 42, St. Chad's-road, South Shore,
Blackpool.

MARY MORRISON, 44, weaver, single, 47, Watson's-lane, South
Shore, Blackpool.

ETHEL COX, 32, weaver, single, 151, Central Drive, Blackpool.

ERNEST TONGE, 46, advertising contractor, 40, Leamington-road,
Blackpool.

ISA GREENWOOD, 21, weaver, single, 30, Thames-road, South Shore,
Blackpool.

ANNE GREENWOOD, 29, weaver, single, sister of Miss Isa Greenwood.

THOMAS HARTLEY, 10, Montrose-avenue, Blackpool.

LESLIE DAWSON, 104, Church-road, Blackpool.

ERNEST PICKUP, goods clerk at Kirkham Station, 11, Hall-avenue, South
Shore, Blackpool.

In addition over 30 persons have been injured, but only three of them
very seriously. They are the following:-

Mr. H. OLDHAM, 107, St. Helens-road, Blackpool, injuries to legs and
arms. [MAB Note: Mr. Oldham died on 6 November, bringing the death toll
to 14.]

Mr. R. H. Hull, 11, All Saints-road, St. Annes, shock.

Mrs. RICHARDSON, 14, Eaves-street, North Shore, Blackpool, injuries to
head and back.

[Several paragraphs giving details of the wreck have been omitted.]

A VICTIM'S BRAVERY

Many persons have spoken of the bravery of Commander Greame, of whom Mr.
A. Tarbuck, of Clifton-street, Lytham, says:-"If ever there was a brave
man it was Commander Greame, for he never made the slightest complaint
and directed his own treatment. Both legs were nearly severed, and all
he asked for was a cup of tea and asked to be remembered to his people
at Blackpool." He died at midnight in Lytham Hospital, whither he had
been taken after urging that others should be attended to before
himself.

Single-track working of trains from Preston to Blackpool was established
by 1.30 this afternoon, and the other line was restored and normal
running resumed to-night.

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