News from 1934 Capt Trant Injured at Sea


Mark Baber

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The New York Times, 11 October 1934

SEAS BATTER LINER; CAPTAIN IS INJURED
---
Trant of the Majestic and His Second Officer Hurt as Wave Breaks Bridge Windows
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THE FORMER CUT BY GLASS
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Taken to Hospital and Probably Will Not Sail Tomorrow---All Passengers
Are Safe

---
With four of her heavy bridge windows shattered by a cumulative wave and
her captain and second officer injured by broken glass, the Cunard White
Star liner Majestic arrived yesterday in command of Captain Frederick J.
Burd, the assistant commander. Turbulent seas besieged the liner almost
all the way across the Atlantic.

When the Majestic docked a day behind schedule, Captain Edgar L. Trant,
commodore of the White Star fleet, was taken in an ambulance to the
French Hospital and doubt was expressed that he would. be able to take
the liner out when she sails tomorrow.

Captain Trant was suffering from wounds on the face, a deep gash in the
scalp which had become infected, and injuries to one shoulder. X-rays
will be made at the hospital to learn the extent o! his shoulder injury.

Log entries disclosed seas from moderate to rough all the way with the
exception of the last day out of New York, when clear, smooth weather
was encountered. The wave that damaged the ship and hurt Captain Trant
and Second Officer H. N. McGill came on the morning of Oct. 4, a day out
of Cherbourg.

A great wave washed over the port bow and glass from the four windows
flew all around the captain, several heavy splinters penetrating his
great-coat and inflicting "deep incised wounds." Apparently as the
captain fell to the deck more glass struck him on the back.

Dr. L. H. Woods, ship's surgeon and Dr. H. P. Orton of Newark, N. J.,
dressed the wounds of both men and Captain Burd took command of the
ship, bringing her through the storm for the remainder of the voyage.
Captain Trant was not unconscious, but had been stunned, and he asked
those who came to his aid to hold him up in a standing position.

The second officer had only minor cuts and remained on duty. Captain
Trant's worst injury was the scalp wound, and this appeared to be
healing until last Monday when Dr. Woods discovered that it was
infected. He placed drainage in the wound and ordered the captain taken
to the hospital.

None of the passengers was injured and the only other damage to the ship
was the flooding of one forward cabin.

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The New York Times, 13 October 1934

Majestic Sails Without Trant
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The Cunard White Star liner Majestic sailed at midnight last night with
Staff Captain F. J. Burd on the bridge in place of Commodore E. L.
Trant, who was injured in the gale that held the Majestic back
twenty-four hours on her last trip to New York. The commodore is in
French Hospital. He will probably be well enough to take command again
on the next voyage.

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The New York Times, 28 October 1934

NOTES OF INTEREST IN SHIPPING WORLD
---
***
Captain Trant Recovering
---
Captain F. [sic] L. Trant, commodore of the White Star Line, who was
taken off his ship, the Majestic, in New York and sent to the French
Hospital Oct. 10 suffering severe cuts on the head and neck by broken
glass, through a sea striking the bridge, is progressing favorably
toward recovery. He will go back to England in the Majestic next
Saturday as a passenger.

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[MAB Notes: 1. These articles conclude this series. Sorry for the delay, but after 72 years, another three weeks doesn't really make much difference, does it? 2. "Friday" was 30 November.]

The New York Times, 25 November 1934

NEWS OF INTEREST IN SHIPPING WORLD
---
Cunard-White Star to Name Joint Commodore for Lines Next Year
***
Captain E. L. Trant, commodore of the White Star Line and Captain R. G.
Malin, Cunard's commodore before the merger both are due to retire at
the end of the year. It is understood that when a new commodore is
appointed by the directors in Liverpool he will be the senior for the
combined fleets.

Sir Edgar T. Britten, master or the Berengaria, also is quitting the sea
at the end of the year and it is expected he will be replaced by Captain
Reginald V. Peel, commodore of the Royal Naval Reserve, retired, and who
probably will he appointed the Cunard-White Star commodore.

Captain Trant, who was taken to the French Hospital Oct. 2 from the
Majestic suffering cuts on the face and neck caused by broken glass on
the bridge during a severe storm, is still recuperating from his
injuries and shock. He will leave for England Friday in the Olympic
accompanied by Mrs. Trant who crossed here to take care of him.
**********
The New York Times, 2 December 1934

NEWS OF INTEREST IN SHIPPING WORLD
***
Captain Trant Leaves Hospital
---
Captain F. [sic] L. Trant, master of the Cunard-White Star liner
Majestic, who has been in the French Hospital since Oct 12 with injuries
to the head and back from shattered glass when a big sea hit the bridge,
sailed Friday night on the Olympic, accompanied by Mrs. Trant, who came
over on the Berengaria. A special doctor went with him to look after the
captain on the voyage to England.

It is not known whether the captain will go to sea again as he is due
for retirement at the end of the year.

Wallace Greenslade, purser of the Olympic, who suffered a heart attack
last Monday, the day before the ship arrived in New York, was much
better, according to the ship's surgeon. He was permitted to get up and
leave his room for a few minutes before the vessel sailed at midnight.

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