Newspapers


Jan 29, 2001
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Evening:

Perhaps even rarer...a salesmans copy of the
NYT 16 April '12 release. In some far-off corner of SHARKEY's (Gaming and Dining) located in Gardnerville/Minden NV, I first saw the paper...framed and untattered...hung in a location far-away from any ultra violet exposure.

Before his death this year Sharkey Begovich was known to all in the Carson Valley area. A collector of, primarily Boxing memorabilia and Circus advertising, sparsley located about you could find other items of interest (ex. TITANIC headline papers, Lincoln campaign broadside!!)

What killed me was the framed LUSITANIA/MAURETANIA rendering by Panzing (The type which adorned the CUNARD ticket offices) hung at the north entrance of the casino. However it has survived...
(aside from the four *large* screws to mount it :-(
the ages, the exposure to the setting sun is taking it's toll, as evidenced by myself, upon nearly two decades of greeting...what a terrible shame :-(

I tried in vain to aquire it, for preservation & sentimental purposes

Michael A. Cundiff
USA
(BTW, on display were also an L.A. Examiner headline..."TITANIC TORN ASUNDER FROM STEM TO STERN".
And oh how we were to learn that, yes indded, these were the facts!
 
Jan 29, 2001
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By the way...

ask Craig Sopin sometime, of a New York paper (ORIGINAL) that he was fortunate to obtain two copies of...

...without a doubt much, much rarer than a 16 April '12 NY Times copy.

MAC
USA
(And to think that I held one in my hands for a spell...:)
 
Jul 10, 2001
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Hi,
I have bought some newspapers a while ago. The condition of a "North American" from April 16th was so bad that you could not unfold it without breaking the whole thing.
I gave it to an Institute that is specialised on Restoring papers. Now the newspaper is fully readable and ready for being kept another 90 years. Of course it has cost me $350. And that´s exactly the reason why I stopped collecting newspapers. On the other hand I got many pages with full Titanic coverage...

Best regards
Henning
 
N

Noah Grey Jones

Guest
Dear mr. Henning

Love to know where you sent the paper item for restoring ?

Noah

Also I sold one a year ago only got $125
Was not New York ( Alabama )
Big ship photo the hole was Quarter as big as the ship, Stating all lost.
 

Bob Phillips

Member
Jan 2, 2007
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I have been given some newspapers dated April 15, 17 ,18 & etc. and the lead story is about the Titanic. I know these are worth something, but how much is the question. Can some one tell me how and why a certain paper edtion is valued.

I plan to sell them, but first I want to read and photograph them for future use. Its really weird how with poor communication their were so many rumors and plain lies about th incident.

Last does any one know what the proper way to store them, their in pretty good shape for 90+ years old, but dry and brown where folded.

Thanks
Bob
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,045
64
308
UK
Hallo, Bob, and welcome. I'm no expert on this subject, but rather than leave your first post unanswered I'll have a go.

Old documents should be stored flat, laid between sheets of acid-free paper, which is not hard to obtain from stationers or artists' suppliers. Keep them somewhere dark, cool and dry - not in an attic where alternating extremes of temperature are damaging. A large flat cardboard box is ok as a container, but don't compress it by stacking other stuff on top.

The value of a newspaper with a Titanic lead story depends on several factors, including its condition. A mass-circulation title like the New York Times or the UK Daily Mirror would be worth more than a local paper, and an edition which 'breaks' the story is more desirable than one which carries follow-up material several days or weeks after the disaster. Check out this thread on ET:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5675/20007.html
 

Bob Phillips

Member
Jan 2, 2007
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Thanks Bob for the reply, my interest in the titanic I'm afraid has to take a back seat to my other hobbies, sailing, ham radio, etc. I have about 20 copies of two different Albany, NY newspapers spanning from April 16 to the 28. Since I don't have the facilities or money to store them, I'll probably sell them after I read and photograph them, Albany is my home town and about 150 miles north a the head of Hudson River where many of passengers were from. I did find a few stories from some of the local Albany survivors that I don't see on this site, so I may add them when I have the time.
Bob
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,045
64
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UK
You're welcome, Bob. Anything you can add to the store of information on the Albany passengers will be much appreciated by us all.
 

Nick Freeman

Member
Sep 6, 2002
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Is there any way you can tell if you have a original NY Times . For example a letter not printed correctly on line 5 page 3 or something like that ?
Nick.
 
Jul 12, 2003
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Just my addition to preserving papers/documents over time...it is important, just as Bob said, not to store these items in places where there are temperature variations. Don't even store papers in a garage because of fumes from car exhaust. Light also can damage paper...chemical damages. These chemical (and oxidative changes) can cause the yellowing and brittleness of paper. An, of course, light also fades papers.

Also, too much handling of a item can be damaging. People produce body oils that leave fingerprints and smudges on paper and pictures. Rolling of documents/papers causes creases, bending, tears, etc.

Copy machines are also destructive because of being exposed to damaging heat, fumes and bright light.

Don't use things like rubber bands which contain sulfur. Some papers themselves contain ingredients such as acids and lignim that can be destructive. Tapes will stain and contract paper.

Also, avoid lamination because of the chemical adhesives and vinyl materials.

If the document is strong and flexible, you can gentley smooth crease with gloved hands or by placing the paper under a polyester sheet for protection. Don't force open rolled documents. Unrolling documents require some humidity and is better left to a conservator.

Never fold back creases as it weakens the paper. Don't flatten paper that is brittle, stiff or badly torn...again, leave this to a conservator.

OF course, just for an "in case', dont' eat or drink near the documents just in case there is a spill.

Preserve the documents between two sheets of archival safe (PVC-free) plastic: polyester, polyethylene, polypropylene or Mylar.

I was reading a article by the VP of PReservation Technologies and he believes in removing harmful factors before "encapsulating" documents/papers. Archival Mist (a water-free spray product that neutralizes acids) can help fight humidity and temp damage and it removes harmful acids. This product, while it doesn't contain water, it does contain magnesium oxide that acts as an alkaline buffer. It is safe for paper.

Since acids accelerate the yellowing of papers and makes them more brittle, it is a good idea to de-acidify them.

Archival supply companies will carry such a product. These companies also supply "encapsulation kits" and safe storage supplies. I think you can go to archivalsuppliers.com for such things. They will have special boxes too.

Finally, storage is recommended to be between 60 and 72 degrees fahrenheit with a humidity temp between 30 and 55 percent. A bank box is actually an excellent place because of the controlled temp.

I learned all this stuff because of the old documents I have collected for my genealogy work.
 
Jul 12, 2003
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No problem...doing any of the above to conserve documents/papers is only worth the time it the article you wish to save is very important.

Besides you guys always supply comprehensive and interesting info here, too, on anything something brings up. Thank you to you.
 

Senan Molony

Member
Jan 30, 2004
1,689
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Dublin
It drives me nuts to see people paying out huge sums every day for *fake* 1912 Daily Mirrors.

How come so many of those survived and not any of the other dailies from that time? There are always a couple on eBay at any time.

This is how you know if you are thinking of bidding on one:

99204.jpg
 

Paul Lalgee

Member
Jan 20, 2007
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Can anybody help me ?
I have spent a long and happy afternoon searching high and low for any information regarding an original newspaper-The Evening Mail ( a now defunct New York paper ), dated Monday 15th April 1912( Final Edition ), which I own.
The headline reads " Titanic's Passengers saved: Liner being towed to Halifax".
Any body out there with any info or any idea of how to get it valued ?
Thanks, Tontz
titanic_newspaper.jpg
 

Hanco Bol

Member
Nov 2, 2008
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On Ebay are a lot of reprinted "The New York Times" newspapers available dated April 16, 1912. Could anyone please tell me how you can find out if a newspaper is an original one? I know there is a difference in terms of letterpress for original newspapers vs. offset lithography for reprints, but are there more differences as well so you can see on a picture if the newspaper is original or not?

For instance Ebay item number: 220425846539.

Thank you in advance for your response.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
5,028
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One give-away in the NTY copy I have is that page two contains the story of how Carr van Anda got his scoop. The real thing would have whatever stories were current on 16 April, other than Titanic.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
5,028
261
353
The white space at the top of mine is much wider and contains the words "Special Commemorative Edition April 15, 1998. There's also a panel at the bottom, drawing attention to the page 2 story. All the other pages have a blank panel at the bottom.

The paper offered may be real, or it may have been trimmed. It's fragility may prove nothing, as mine is already fragile. I'm suspicious about the 24 pages. TNYT was huge paper in 1912 and I'd expect more.

I'd demand to see page 2 for a start.

If it's still around, the reprint costs about $32 US.
 

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