NMM and Walter Lord Collection


Inger Sheil

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A source has just told me that items from the Walter Lord collection are now on display at the NMM, including the pig-of-great-fame. This seems have been done with remarkably little fanfare, although there was some media from Greenwich:

http://www.nmm.ac.uk/site/request/setTemplate:singlecontent/contentTypeA/conWebDoc/contentId/5574/navId/00500400b

A very fitting home for Lord's collection, IMHO, and certainly an expansion on their previous Titanic holdings. Of course, it's the correspondence that interests me most...I have copies of some of the material pertaining to the deck officers, but wonder if the James Caird museum both has these important items and, if so, is allowing access to the documents yet? Has anyone viewed them in their new home? I'm out there doing mercantile marine research sometime in the next few weeks, so will have a sticky beak - but does anyone have the full story?
 
May 12, 2005
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Thanks for the link, Inger. Very interesting. It's good to know that all Walter's incredible correspondence and his equally fabulous collection of momentos are being looked after and shared with the public. I, too, find it disappointing that more media attention has not been paid the "unveiling" of this collection.

Also nice to hear that old Edy's piglet "Max" is still getting about. Though I expect the ugly thing will be much lonelier now with an archive for a home instead of a warm living room. It will likely survive us all!
 

Inger Sheil

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Finally had a chance to go out there and see it for myself as I had some work to do in the James Caird library.

The far-famed Pig is indeed there, and greeting many international visitors from behind his new glass display case. There was quite a press of folks around the display. They've added the case to the pre-existing Titanic exhibit, which is fairly modest (although rather atmospheric). Also there are the rather attractive slippers and various other bits and bobs from Lord's collection. A bit more acknowledgement of him as the person who gave them to the museum wouldn't have gone astray, or perhaps I missed it. There is a photo of him with others (from memory, Mrs Futrelle and Mr and Mrs MacQuitty) at the premiere of ANTR.

Checked on the status of his papers, and apparently they're still being catalogued and so are not yet accessible to the public.
 
T

Trent Pheifer

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Thanks for the update Inger...I have been really curious as to how his things were going to be displayed! Thanks

-Trent
 
May 12, 2005
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Inger,

Thanks muchly for that update. I am looking forward to the opening up of Walter Lord's collection. I have heard that some "brass" have gotten to see portions of the material already. For the rest of us, we are on a waiting list! But that's fine. It will be worth it to get to examine the collection. I can't finish up my article on Edith Russell until I find out if documents alluded to by other researchers, mainly Pellegrino, do in fact exist. Lord's correspondence with "Edy" is also crucial to gaining insight into their relationship.

I am excited that "Maxixe" the pig, surely Titanic's most unusual "survivor," is holding its own. I read on the BBC site that along with piggie and the slippers was the crochet cap that Edy wore off the ship. Did you happen to see that little item on display as well?

By the way, m'lady, I am soon to be sending a special something your way....have been poking about in a certain Texas archive for you.

Best as ever,
Randy
 

Inger Sheil

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It's a pretty straightforward display, Trent - no real bells and whistles, I'm afraid. Of course, the items speak volumes for themselves, so it could be argued that they don't need any embellishment, but still...

Randy, the cap is indeed there! Forgot to mention it. I've got copies of a few items in the Lord collection of documents that have been useful to me in my own work, but would like to have a look through the rest of them in my own time. Must ask if there's a projected time frame for making them publicly accessible the next time I speak to the staff at Greenwich. They knew exactly what I was talking about when I mentioned 'The Walter Lord bequest'.

If that item from a Texas archive is what I think it is, then you'll be earning undying gratitude from my family for slotting in a piece of our family history! (and satisying something I've been curious about for - oh - just about the span of my own life).
 
May 12, 2005
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