No A La Carte or Cafe Parisien?


Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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At a guess, i'd suggest that would be because the Britannic was converted into a hospital ship, so the cafe would have to cater for a bunch of sick and wounded soldiers as opposed to first class passengers dining in style.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hmm. What about the first class smoking room / dining room, etc? I'd imagine it'd have to be a fairly big transformation to change a passenger ship into a viable hospital ship.

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Germany
Adam, the changes on Britannic have nothing to do with her transformation to a hospital ship. Britannic had partly a different interior. She would have similar suites on B Deck as Titanic (but again very different) the A-la-carte Retaurant took all the width and the Cafe Parisien was removed. There was a plan for a similar cafe on A Deck. The dining room would have been the same, the smoking room was one of the other changes and would have been much different from Olympic & Titanic. Also she was going to have new rooms, like the children play room on the boat deck or a gymnasium for the 2nd class.
 

Aidan Bowe

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Aug 11, 2004
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I was watching a fascinating programme on the BBC commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking. On it they interviewed a gentleman whose grandmother was Sheila Macbeth, a nurse who survived. A sailor presented her with a piece of a chair that was floating in the water which she kept for the rest of her life. Her grandson now owns that relic. The piece is clearly from a chair from the a la carte restaurant, the design and carvings identical to those on Olympic and Titanic. I was always under the impression that Britannic sailed in a unfinished state, very utilitarian with no fancy fixtures or fittings onboard. Would this piece of chair indicate that she did in fact sail with some of her interiors/furniture installed? Maybe for the officer classes of the servicemen?
 

JJAstorII

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Mar 14, 2017
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Los Angeles, CA
I was watching a fascinating programme on the BBC commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking. On it they interviewed a gentleman whose grandmother was Sheila Macbeth, a nurse who survived. A sailor presented her with a piece of a chair that was floating in the water which she kept for the rest of her life. Her grandson now owns that relic. The piece is clearly from a chair from the a la carte restaurant, the design and carvings identical to those on Olympic and Titanic. I was always under the impression that Britannic sailed in a unfinished state, very utilitarian with no fancy fixtures or fittings onboard. Would this piece of chair indicate that she did in fact sail with some of her interiors/furniture installed? Maybe for the officer classes of the servicemen?
Though I'm no expert on Britannics interiors, I have read that she was brought back to H & W to be fitted out and then was RE-called back into service causing them to try to rapidly undo the work they had started. So, there in lies the mystery... how far did they get in that week and how far did they get stripping her the three days they had before she had to return to service. I think there was actually quite a bit done to the interior design of the public rooms as not a lot has surfaced in terms of finding these fittings in warehouses etc.
 

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