No word on Second Class


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jean leysman

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Why do we hear so little about the second class on Titanic. I mean we know virtually everything there is to know about first and third class, being from the movies or the books.
Could it be that second class passengers were just not interesting enough. Maybe there are no dramatic stories that can be told about them. Or do I just have to catch up on my Titanic-gossip?
By the way, does anybody know about pictures of second and third class accommodation? So far I haven't seen any.

Jean
 
Jean,

Good point. Second-class passengers have never been the main focus of any movies made about the Titanic - with the exception, perhaps, of the 1980 TV movie 'Titanic'.

Books have been kinder to this group of people but they still seem "lost" in the Titanic's legacy.

I certainly wouldn't say their stories weren't interesting enough. The Navratil saga is one of the Titanic's more legendary passenger stories. There were scandals in second class too - look at the Faunthorpe/Wilkinson and Marshall/Morley/Phillips relationships, as well as Joseph Fynney. There were revelations in the Laroche family story that shocked and surprised many long time Titanic researchers and authors. The list goes on.....

I must say that we do know quite a bit about the Titanic's second class passengers. Survivors Lawrence Beesley, Kate Buss, Albert Caldwell, Charlotte Collyer and many others have left behind fascinating accounts of their experiences. Similarly, many of the remaining survivors within the last twenty years were second class passengers and have further added to our knowledge of this particular class. Survivors Eva Hart, Ruth Becker Blanchard, Edith Brown Haisman and Marshall Drew have provided so many interesting details of life on board.

The stories are there. Unfortunately, they do not seem to generate the same amount of interest or intrigue as do the first and third class passengers in film or on paper.

Mike Findlay
 
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Cátia Lamy

Guest
Hi!

I would say that everyone gives more attention to the first and third class because the first ones are the rich, with all that luxury and dresses, and money and all that while the steerage were the poor ones, which most died running for a dream that turned out on a nightmare. The second class passengers were the not so rich, not so poor passengers and maybe the fact that not even one second class child died may have helped on this fact (on first class little Allison died and on the third about 50 children died if I'm not mistaken).

Anyway, even today this happens. What do you see on the newspapers and magazines? The rich people with all their castles and parties and the poor people sleeping on the street and eating carbage or such. The "second class" don't have so much trouble or some much interest!

See ya!
Cátia Lamy
 
The second class never really got the attention recieved by first and third. They're the middle class. Not rich, not poor. Just... there. Plus, there weren't as many of them. Look at a class map. The second class space is tiny! 284 in second class as compared to the 324 in first and 709 in sceond. But this is just one among many reasons. I agree that there are many interesting storyies to tell in second class, but most people prefer to reflect upon the opulance of first class and the hapless third class.

In fact, the second class storyline was the only thing I could say I liked about "SOS Titanic."

Josh.
 
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Stacie Crowther

Guest
For some reason, I feel that the old couple holding each other in their bed as the water rushed by in Cameron's Titanic was a second class stateroom. It was not like either of the other class rooms. It did look like the second class rooms from other sources such as books.

As far as second class recognition is concerned, they were so poorly portrayed in the various movies. And as others have stated, it must be because second class is neither of the extremes.
 

Ben Holme

Member
Hi Stacie,

Cameron was depicting Isidor and Ida Straus in his "old couple on bed" scene. Mrs. Straus refused the refuge of a lifeboat to meet her fate with her husband. However, this could hardly have been the fate of the Strauses. The body of Isidor was recovered, so he must certainly have net his death above decks. I never paid particular attention to the stateroom furnishings, but their suite (B-55,57,59) was one of the four most opulent on the ship.

Regards,
Ben
 
I'm a little late here...

If I remember correctly, they're depicted as being on a brass bed in the movie. However, their cabin (C57 - by the way, not B deck) had mahogany beds - rather very nice looking cot beds.

Daniel.
 

Ben Holme

Member
Daniel,

Sorry, I meant C-55/57/59. The B-deck suites above were occupied by the Cardezas and consisted of B-51/53/55. Just a casual error. Thanks for the info re. furnishing. I think there is little doubt that Cameron was depicting the Strauses in the scene.

Ben
 
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Stacie Crowther

Guest
OOPS, Anyway, there were some many errors with Titanic's furnishings and scenes in Cameron's Titanic. For example, third class beds were not made of metal poles and rods as depicted in the movie.

The Strauss scene was so misleading due to the furniture set up.
 
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