Not named until after the launch?/"Weak rivets," redux


TitanicNerd

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A went to a local exhibit and it says they wouldn't name Titanic until after she was launched. Is this true? How does the naming system work?
 

Adam Went

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I'd say that had something to do with the fact that White Star Line didn't officially "christen" their ships - the names were known but at the time they were being constructed, they weren't known so much by name but by allotment numbers.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Adam Went

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That's right, TitanicNerd. Although apparently there are stories of people "unofficially" naming the ship as she was launched, scenes like the one at the beginning of "A Night To Remember" where the wine bottle was broken over the prow and so forth never actually happened.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Thomas Ozel

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May 17, 2012
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A went to a local exhibit and it says they wouldn't name Titanic until after she was launched. Is this true?

This photo is described by Wikipedia as being taken in October 1910, and the name "Titanic" can be clearly seen on a noticeboard on the left hand side of the image:

Olympic_Titanic_Belfast.jpg
 
Mar 18, 2008
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A went to a local exhibit and it says they wouldn't name Titanic until after she was launched. Is this true? How does the naming system work?

That is complete rubbish! Olympic & Titanic were well known by their name even in late 1909. In only a few cases the name was not given for some time like Britannic which was only No. 433 or the famous Cunard Liner No. 534 which became Queen Mary.
 

Adam Went

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I would hope that a Titanic exhibit, if authentic, would be more accurate with information. Ioannis, the only thing I can suggest is as above - that it was a reference to the early construction phases of the ship.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

TitanicNerd

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So...they named the ships Olympic and Titanic, put their name on a board and put that board where Olympic and Titanic were being built. Did they have the name Titanic on the bow before or after launch?
 

Doug Criner

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U.S. Navy ships have their names on the stern, not the bow. The raised letters are welded onto the steel hull plating, probably to help simplify repainting of the name.

If a similar procedure was followed for the Olympic class ships, the names would have been designated long before launch, and even before the steel hull plates in the bow were initially erected.

Maybe the O.P. could contact the museum and ask the source of their information.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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A lot of museums...a really amazing number...have their facts wrong. This is unfortunate and a bit alarming in view of such institutions being viewed as authorities, but it shouldn't surprise any of us.

Disappoint...yes.

But not surprise.
 

TitanicNerd

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Yeah, the Branson attraction I went to is all wrong about many things. I could tell immediately how inaccurate somethings were.
 

TitanicNerd

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You seem suspicious of "The Museum."

It's a RMS Titanic Inc owned exhibit and it's the one in Buena Park, CA.

Even if you weren't suspicious, great point!
 

TimTurner

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O.P. means "Original Poster". It's the first person to ask a question. In this case, that would be you, TitanicNerd.:cool:
 

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