Not Wanted luggage labels


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mike disch

Guest
At CA Science Ctr, one of the sealed real artifact display boxes includes a White Star tag marked "Not Wanted" recovered (by itself, not attached to any luggage). I would guess this is for luggage that is ultimately never claimed, once the ship has reached its final destination, and luggage goes unclaimed. This is my speculation. Does anyone know?
 

Brian Meister

Member
Mar 1, 2001
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Hello Mike,

It was explained to me that these tags were
employed to mark luggage that would not be
needed by the passenger while aboard the ship.
It could therefore be placed in a less acces-
sible spot as other luggage which could be
sent for during the sailing.

Hope this helps.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Luggage labels are still affordable- this one was about 6 dollars and is maybe 6x4 inches with a moisture adhesive backing like a postage stamp. "Not wanted" meant not wanted in the cabin- passengers away for long journeys packed trunks of clothing for other seasons, or salesmen carried trunks of samples, which would be loaded in the hold for the voyage end, then piled on the pier alphabetically (by first initial /last name) to be collected at disembarcation. It used to be a desirable thing to have one's suitcases and trunks covered in labels from exclusive hotels and shipping lines- showed you got around in swanky places!
 

Pat Winship

Member
May 8, 2001
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I seem to recall that one of the Junior Officers' duties was to go to the hold and supervise, every time a passnger changed his or her mind and wanted something from their "not wanted" luggage.

Pat Winship
 
Apr 11, 2001
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One of the few really affordable catagories of ship collectables still around is baggage labels-there were so many printed. That one above, an original, I picked up in a bookstore- the best cheap ship stuff is found in places that don't specialize in ship stuff! Of course those with the ship on them, and really old ones, White Star before the merger, and some with gorgeous graphics are worth more.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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This one's a beauty- made of light cardboard and unused- about 7 x 5. I suspect used ones from famous people must bring a good price- recently some from the Duke and Duchess of Windsor were auctioned.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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This one is thin paper with the lick and stick backing but is quite large- an oval 8 inches by 4. The best way to store them is in an acidproof sleeve- this one still has the price label on it- $5.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Here's a special one with the passenger's initial stick on label attached to the steamer trunk cardboard tag- it is dated 1949 and Caroline Veihelst is aboard the "Washington" NewYork via LeHavre third class. She is bound for Alabama to see the Pattersons on Bayou Street! Lots of fun these things are-a whole story on a tag.
 

Noel F. Jones

Member
May 14, 2002
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Passengers' baggage categorises as 'Cabin' (or 'Stateroom'), 'Baggage Room' and 'Hold' and must be labelled accordingly by the passenger prior to embarkation. An adequate supply of labels is issued with passage tickets as a matter of course.

There is a further category, 'Unaccompanied', which would be shipped on a parcel receipt and given 'special' stowage appropos its susceptability to pilferage and handling damage. Such items could be collected from the wharfinger at the berth by any person presenting a delivery note issued at the 'town office' against the parcel receipt. Depending on company procedure, u/a/c/ baggage might be brought from the berth to a baggage store at the town office for collection.

Household effects would normally be shipped as cargo on a conventional bill of lading and would outturn with other general cargo consigned to an elected agent of the consignee in the usual way. Household effects shipments are generally handled by specialist agents. On the UK side, the names Pitt & Scott and Pickfords come to mind.

'Cabin' baggage (usually suitcases and similar) would be worked from the boat train platforms to the shipside either by shoreside baggage gangs or ship's staff (depending on union rules prevailing at the port) and through the accommodation direct to the staterooms by 'chain gangs' of stewards deployed to embarkation stations.

'Baggage Room' items (such as the larger steamer trunks) would be handled between the boat train platforms and shipside by the shoreside baggage gangs and would be shipped into the baggage room spaces either by crane (plumbing the bunker hatch in the case of the Olympics) or by portable conveyers working through shell doors.

Unwieldly items shipped as 'Cabin' baggage, such as large suitcases and cabin trunks, might later be brought down from the staterooms to the baggage room by the bedroom stewards after departure.

Throughout the voyage the baggage rooms would be open to the passengers at set times of day as notified.

It is 'Hold' baggage that is traditionally labelled 'Not Wanted on the Voyage'. Generally too large a 'parcel' for special stowage, hold baggage would be stowed along with general cargo in any convenient cargo compartment. As with general cargo, it would necessarily be given a sea-fast stow (dunnaged and chocked off as necessary) unlike 'Baggage Room' items which would be racked for easy access in the baggage rooms. It would however be given 'top stow' (last in, first out) because it had to join the other baggage for customs inspection in the terminal at time of disembarkation.

Hold baggage is not intended to be accessible on passage. If inadvertently mis-labelled it could occasionally be accessed by supplicating the Chief Officer and with the exercise of some considerable labour and a lot of luck!

On the GA I see two compartments allocated to baggage, on the lower (G) deck and the orlop (E), both accessed via portals in the bunker hatch trunk and presumably worked by the deck cranes forward of the centrecastle.

The first class baggage room was accessed from inside the accommodation via a staircase from F deck. The second class baggage room seems to have been accessed via a further staircase between the post office on G deck and the mailroom and thence through a portal in the centreline bulkhead - a compromise on security I would have thought.

I am surprised that vessels of this size did not carry Baggage Masters rated as such. The duties of baggage masters include the searching of embarkation boat trains for mislaid items and the attending of customs inspections at disembarkation to log any claims for items allegedly damaged in transit. I discern only one Baggage Steward on the Articles, an E.Bessant, and can only assume that other stewards were also deployed to baggage room duty as required.

Noel
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Darren- I don't need much encouragement- this is my rarest one. There were 2 Guion Lines- one only lasted from 1862-63 and the other from 1866-1894, both controlled by Stephen Guion, but not related to each other. I am hoping this label is from the early line- it would be worth more! Actually the proper name for the later Guion Line was the Liverpool & Great Western Liverpool and Great Western- and was a big hit with the Norwegians bound for New York via Queenstown- Wilson Line carried them as far as Hull. Most of these ships had U.S. state names like Nebraska, Arizona- Oregon was the fastest and did the crossing in 6 days and 10 hours- not bad!
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Apr 11, 2001
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Finding a ship portrait on a label is harder- this one is the Manhattan. Am still looking for one with Normandie on it.
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Come on over Darren- actually I like collecting ship's stationery and onboard newpapers too- all still cheap. I love the deco look of this one- United Fruit was not famous, but had some snappy white hulls- and oh- those Havana cruises in the 30's! Can't remember that movie with Ginger and Fred dancing in front of one of these tropical lovelies... Flying Down to Rio I think. Think Carmen Miranda and think United Fruit!
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Apr 11, 2001
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I like to pretend this is from Normandie! The script on French Line is fabulous-funny how so many labels were red, white and blue.This is a sticky one- about 3 x 5.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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Shelley:

When I have more time I will find a few of my better baggage labels.

As for the "Not Wanted" Here is an unused original trunk tag from the Canadian Pacific Lines with an image of the Empress of Britain / etc on it.

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Dana Cantu

Guest
This may be a question that no one can answer, but it is an interesting one to think on. The First Class passengers had pretty much the best of everything right? I'm sure there were many who wore jewels from the extremely prestigious House of Tiffany. (We already know there were Tiffany china that went down with the ship in the cargo hold) But what of their luggage? The House of Louis Vuitton was around during this time, having started in 1854, one of the oldest Couture Houses in the world, in which they do specialize in making luggage. So I was wondering what were the chances of some First classers having Louis Vuitton luggage? Interesting...
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>So I was wondering what were the chances of some First classers having Louis Vuitton luggage? Interesting...<<

If it was popular enough among the upper crust, I would suppose the chances are pretty good. I don't think you'll find any record of it one way or another.

Baggage and trunks were seperated into two groups. "Wanted" being what was sent to the passenger's staterooms and being what they lived out of during the voyage. "Not Wanted" was what was stowed in the baggage compartments down below. The crew was profoundly interested in making sure it all went where it was supposed to but cared little about who made it.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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I can think of at least three first-class passengers who were most certainly accompanied by Vuitton luggage aboard the 'Titanic' - Charlotte Cardeza (surprise, surprise), Leontine Aubart and Marie Spencer. Daniel Klistorner has done much research into the insurance claims lodged after the sinking and, thanks to him, we even know how much Mrs Spencer's trunk cost (200 francs) and when she bought it (27th March). Undoubtedly, many other passengers would have been toting Vuitton too - the brand was every bit as prestigious back in 1912 as it is today.
 

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