Not Wanted luggage labels


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Dana Cantu

Guest
Thanks guys! Now that Vuitton is somewhat "Titanic related", I really want to buy some lol! Thanks very much!
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Hi Dana,

I know that in the touring Titanic Exhibitions by RMSTI, I have definitely seen one piece of jewelry marked by Tiffany's. I wanna say it was a stick pin ~ in fact, I keep thinking it was a gold stickpin with an amber-colored scarab at the head. Anyway, I don't remember exactly which piece it was, but it was, without question, a Tiffany piece.

Does anyone else know or remember which jewelry item it was? I'm sure it is much traveled by now.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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I'm pretty certain that one of Mrs Cardeza's most valuable pieces of jewellery, a pink diamond worth many thousands, came from Tiffany. I need to recheck her insurance claim. As with Louis Vuitton, many of the wealthy Americans travelling in first-class are certain to have patronised the famous New York store.

Colonel Astor, George and Harry Widener and Edgar Meyer are all known to have been clients of Tiffany's great French rival, Cartier. Eleanor Widener's fabulous pearls were bought there.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hi Jason,

quote:

Does anyone else know or remember which jewelry item it was?

Are you referring to the fox head stick pin? Here's the description from RMS Titanic's web site:

quote:

14k yellow gold, glass; L 1 15/16" X W 3/16"; Custom wax and cast. This tiny detailed fox scarf pin or stick pin has two small, round, cabochom eyes--each of which measures approximately 1 millimeter in diameter.

I'm not sure who it belonged to, but that's the only stick pin that I've seen.​
 
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Dana Cantu

Guest
Wow, that's so cool. I love Louis Vuitton & Tiffanys! I'd love to see what Vuitton looked like then, and of course Tiffany's is never dated...where could I read all the lost items?
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Hey Jason,

I have seen the fox stick pin of which you speak, but that's not the one I was referring to. The fox pin is pretty though, and I like it better than the scarab pin.

The scarab pin can be seen on page 16 of the newer (2006) reprint of the book "Titanic The Artifact Exhibition" put out and sold by RMSTI. It is this pin, which, if I am remembering correctly, was marked as a Tiffany piece in it's display case I saw in the exhibition.

If it wasn't that specific pin, then I KNOW I saw SOMETHING (piece of jewelry) at a Titanic Exhibition that WAS marked for sure.

Hey Dana, did you want to read about the passenger's insurance claims, or about recovered artifacts, or both?
 

Ben Lemmon

Member
Feb 6, 2008
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OK, I had a question. Would Second Class passengers have brought an automobile on board to go to America, or was that solely a First-class privilege? What was the cost for doing such a thing? I know it must have been pricey. Any information would be welcome and thankfully accepted.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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I have no idea of the exact answer to your question, Ben.

However, I expect anyone who could pay, and if there was room in the hold, could export an automobile to America. It's just rather unlikely to have been a second class passenger. Cost.

Of some interest might be the question of why anyone would want to do this - and I don't know the answer, but it's possibly to do with left or right-hand drive. Mainland Europe (France - Renault), like the USA, drives on the right. The UK and some other countries, on the left. I'm not sure when these protocols became established, though I know the right-hand drive protocol has something to do with Napoleon - despite the fact that it is patently silly to make people (majority right-handed) to change gear with their right hand, which means taking it off the steering wheel, where you'd think it'd be more needed. Still, people are adaptable.

Do you think you might be getting bogged down with minute detail, at the expense of writing?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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At that time a lot of American cars were still right-hand drive, which had been the convention for horse-drawn vehicles. Ford didn't change till 1908, and Cadillac didn't offer a left-hand drive option before 1915. Apart from the obvious safety advantage when overtaking, this meant that your front-seat passenger (often a lady) could get in and out on the kerb side. Not that it made much difference, considering the standards of driving at the time!

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Ben, considering the high ocean freight charges for an item as large as a crated automobile, I imagine that your 2nd-Class family, if they had a car at all, would certainly leave it at home. Or if emigrating they'd sell their car in England and buy another in the US. Any of us would probably do the same today.
.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I'm not aware of what the freight rates were at the time though I'm certain it would have been out of reach for those in the second class. However, White Star, like any shipping line, was out to make money. They wouldn't care if you were a begger off the streets working your way across by shoveling coal in the stokehold: If you could pony up the cash, they would cheerfully pack it in and send it as far as the money would allow.

As it stands, the only car being shipped on the Titanic was owned by a first class passenger.
 
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Aaron Stelmach

Guest
When i was at the Louis Vuitton Store in Manchester buying bags, They had on display a 1909 Special Edition Louis Vuitton Trunk there were only 100 made in France at a retail price of 405 francs, three of these trunks boarded the Titanic in France and sadly went down with the Ship, the Trunks were the classic pattern Monogram. The trunks were stored as not wanted, so they were stored below deep in the ship, finding them would be impossible as the trunks would of decayed away, the only remains of them would be the brass plated corner edges and the brass plated bottom stamped with Louis Vuitton.
285308.jpg
this is what they looked like
 

Arlind Molla

Member
Mar 7, 2018
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Hi, everyone! I had some questions; where did second-class passengers store their baggage, luggage and every other item they possessed during the voyage? Was there a cargo for them two, or they just kept all of their belongings with them inside the cabins...!? Their cabins seems to be fairly small, after all for placing everything they had. Thanks!
 

Yuriko Cheng

Member
Nov 7, 2020
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Hi all, quick question! Would it be possible for a passenger to send their 'not wanted' luggage to the ship a day or two before sailing day, arriving with only their cabin luggage? or would they have to lug around half a dozen trunks with them onto Titanic?

Also, what was the difference between 'baggage room' items and 'hold' items? What sort of items might a passenger put in the baggage room as opposed to the hold?

Thanks!
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
6,491
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NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
When i was at the Louis Vuitton Store in Manchester buying bags, They had on display a 1909 Special Edition Louis Vuitton Trunk there were only 100 made in France at a retail price of 405 francs, three of these trunks boarded the Titanic in France and sadly went down with the Ship, the Trunks were the classic pattern Monogram. The trunks were stored as not wanted, so they were stored below deep in the ship, finding them would be impossible as the trunks would of decayed away, the only remains of them would be the brass plated corner edges and the brass plated bottom stamped with Louis Vuitton. View attachment 18552 this is what they looked like
I have one very like that.
 
Dec 27, 2017
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Isle of Man
Hi all, quick question! Would it be possible for a passenger to send their 'not wanted' luggage to the ship a day or two before sailing day, arriving with only their cabin luggage? or would they have to lug around half a dozen trunks with them onto Titanic?

Also, what was the difference between 'baggage room' items and 'hold' items? What sort of items might a passenger put in the baggage room as opposed to the hold?

Thanks!
Hello Yuriko. The answer to your first question is, yes but they may not have loaded the luggage until sailing day and kept it in a warehouse.

Baggage room items were required during the voyage (clothing items, say) and would be retrieved by the stewards on request. Hold items were inaccessible during the crossing as they would have been squeezed tightly into the available hold space so that they didn't move if the ship rolled and to make the best use of the space they had.
 

B-rad

Member
Jul 1, 2015
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Tacoma, WA
Baggage marked 'stateroom' or 'cabin' meant baggage was to be kept with you. Baggage not kept with you but may be possibly wanted was marked 'Wanted' or 'Baggage Room'. The baggage master (usually the Second Steward) would then set certain days and times that passengers could access these bags under supervision. However, this was not a guarantee and was a privilege not a right. Baggage not wanted at all was labeled 'Hold' 'Not Wanted'.
Baggage was encouraged to be sent to the pier prior to voyage, but all baggage had to be claimed prior to boarding the vessel. Baggage was marked by the initial of the surname.
 

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