Number of passengers & crew


Alex Kiehl

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Aug 1, 2006
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After years of researching this stuff, these are the conclusions I have reached. Can anyone please tell me if these figures are correct?

Here they are, the figures at the time of the disaster:

Total Passengers & Crew–2,208 (2,084 Adults, 124 Children) 712 Rescued (648 Adults, 64 Children) 1,496 Lost (1,436 Adults, 60 Children)

Total Passengers–1,317 (1,194 Adults, 123 Children) 500 Rescued (436 Adults, 64 Children) 817 Lost (758 Adults, 59 Children)

Total 1st Class Passengers–324 (201 Rescued) (123 Lost)
Total 2nd Class Passengers–285 (118 Rescued) (167 Lost)
Total 3rd Class Passengers–708 (181 Rescued) (527 Lost)

Total Children on Board–124 (67 Boys, 57 Girls)–64 Rescued (32 Boys, 32 Girls)–60 Lost (35 Boys, 25 Girls)

Total 1st Class Children– 7 (5 Boys, 2 Girls)–6 Rescued (5 Boys, 1 Girl)–1 Lost (Girl)
Total 2nd Class Children–27 (12 Boys, 15 Girls)–26 Rescued (11 Boys, 15 Girls)–1 Lost (Boy)
Total 3rd Class Children–89 (49 Boys, 40 Girls)–32 Rescued (16 Boys, 16 Girls)–57 Lost (33 Boys, 24 Girls)
Total Crew Children–1 (Boy)–0 Rescued–1 Lost

Total Crew–891 (890 Adults [867 Men, 23 Women], 1 Child [Boy])–212 Rescued–679 Lost

Total Deck Crew–66 (All Men)–43 Rescued–23 Lost
Total Restaurant Staff–69 (67 Men, 2 Women)–3 Rescued (1 Man, 2 Women)–66 Lost (All Men)
Total Engine Crew–325 (All Men)–62 Rescued–263 Lost
Total Victualling Crew–431 (430 Adults [409 Men, 21 Women], 1 Child [Boy])–104 Rescued (86 Men, 18 Women)–327 Lost (323 Men, 3 Women, 1 Child)

Does these look right, folks? I'd greatly appreciate the help. Thanks.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hi Alex,

That would also depend on whether you wanted to include those who embarked/disembarked at Cherbourg or Queenstown as well. While those who disembarked at either of the ports weren't in the sinking, technically they still were "passengers".
 

Alex Kiehl

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Aug 1, 2006
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Hildur and Adam,

Thank you both for responding to my question. I'm very much obliged.

My figures include everyone who was on the ship a the time of the sinking. I have excluded the passengers who disembarked at Cherbourg and Queenstown, plus Stoker Coffey.

The book "1912 Facts About Titanic" says that one became an adult upon reaching the age of 15. This site (ET) has a list of 127 children who are all 14 and under, so I'm a little confused.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hey Alex,

No problem - I think it's a great thing you're trying to do here as there are regularly so many false estimates as to the numbers of each class, total number of people on board, number of survivors and casualties, and so on.

As for the age of becoming an adult, would that be the same as the age of consent? If that's the case, in 1912, it would have been 16. Prior to 1875, the age of consent was 12, from 1875 to 1885 it was 13, and then it was eventually made 16 - W.T. Stead was actually instrumental in that change through his journalistic work with the Pall Mall Gazette.

Anyway, hope that helps a bit....
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Check out this archived thread and my posting No 3315, which is (I think!) the definitive one on the subject of how young people were regarded in 1912. I Hope it clears up any remaining confusion.

 

Alex Kiehl

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Aug 1, 2006
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Thanks, Adam and Bob. Both of your responses were helpful to me.

Suppose we accept the figures from ET's list of children as being correct. Would that make the totals I came up with as also being correct?

Congratulations, Bob, on your milestone 5000th post.
 

george bowes

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Feb 7, 2007
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Alex
Congratulations. Lester Mitcham guided me through a similar exercise. I did not break it down for children. For me, the age limit is 16. Interesting enough, there was a 14 year old wife. Was she counted as a child?
 

george bowes

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Feb 7, 2007
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Congratulations, Alex. Pleased to see your post on the count. Lester Mitcham guided me through a similar exercise several months ago. We did not separate children from adults. If I did, I would assume the age of 16. Interesting enough, where do we place the 14 year old bride?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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In case anybody might think otherwise, the fact that 12-year-olds were charged adult fares does not imply that the Edwardians regarded these young people as adults in any other sense. Even today in Britain it's still the norm to charge adult rates for admissions, train tickets etc to children aged 12 or over. Legal distinctions aside, in the society of 1912 boys and girls became young men and women at the age of 16, as George has suggested. In employment statistics, for instance, if a workforce was made up of 'boys and men' then the 'men' would be any male aged 16 or over, though those under 21 were still minors in the eyes of the law.

In most parts of the US and NW Europe that 14-year old wife would have been described as a 'child bride'.
 

Alex Kiehl

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Aug 1, 2006
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Hmmm, my post didn't take; I'll try it over again.

Yes, the bride was included as being a child. So, since 16 was considered the age of adulthood, how do we get ET to change their children's list so as to include 15-year-olds?
 

DonJ

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Apr 6, 2012
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There were a number of men who were not listed at either passengers or crew. They were the harland and Wolff's Guarantee Team. 3 were listed a 1st class passengers namely: Thomas Andrews - Chief designer, W.H.M. Parr - Asst \manager Electrical Dept, Rodwick Chisholm - Chief Draughtsman.
The others were in 2nd class, namely: Anthony W. Frost - Engineer Foreman; Robert Knight - Engineer Fitter; William Campbell - Apprentice Joiner; Alfred F.Cunningham - Apprentice Fitter (He was thought to have survived until it was realised that there was a passenger of the same name), Frank Parkes - Apprentice Plumber and Ennis H. Watson -Apprentice Electrician. None survived
 
Jul 20, 2000
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You are correct that the 6 H&W men who travelled on Second Class tickets are not on the White Star Passenger List of May 1912 as it appears in A Night to Remember. Neither are the 8 Bandsmen who also travelled on a Second Class ticket listed on that Passenger List. Interestingly the H&W men are in the US Senate List — Report 806. - The bandsmen are not. - As an afterthought the 8 Bandsmen are added to the Crew Numbers, but are also included within the Number of Second Class Passengers.
All of them [H&W and Bandsmen] are named on the Southampton Boarding List, on the Contract List and on the Lists of Deceased Second Class Passengers. The 5 Mail Clerks are not included in any numbers count or record except for one Deceased Passenger List, where they are added almost as an afterthought.
All of the H&W men [except for Andrews], the bandsmen [except for Brailey] and the 2 British Mail Clerks are listed in the Titanic Relief Fund Mansion House booklet of March 1913 with Crew Relief Fund Numbers.

>>Alfred F.Cunningham - Apprentice Fitter (He was thought to have survived until it was realised that there was a passenger of the same name),<< Do you mean that Cunningham was confused with bedroom steward Andrew Cunningham, who survived?
 

Howard R

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Jun 20, 2020
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Hi!

I know that this probably have been discussed before, but I try to search and search and just can't find... there are different numbers all over...

Total numbers onboard on the way to New York: 2208 (or possibly 2207 depending on a certain crew member in the a la carte restaurant, right?).
Total survivors: 712. (Additional 5 were picked up by the Carpathia, with 4 burials-at sea at Monday afternoon and later 1 additional death ??)
Total deaths: 1496.

These numbers seem to be correct as far as I know, right?

But what are the numbers for crew and passengers?
I read somewhere that total numbers of crews were 885 male + 23 female = 908 in total.
That means passenger number is 2208 - 908 = 1300.
So was the total number of passengers 1300 on the way to New York?? I have never encountered that number before...

And I have some numbers that says 7 left in Cherbourg and 24 left in Queenstown. That is 31 in total? So in total there were 1331 passengers that travelled with the Titanic?

I hope some of you experts can clarify this to me. I have tried really hard to find out.
Thanks a lot!

Kind regards,
Howard.
 

Aly Jones

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Nov 22, 2008
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Why is that there were so small number of women passengers compared to men? I know the crew were mostly men however, women like to travel as well. They were allowed to book, and travel as freely as the men were, so why Few women?
 
Nov 14, 2005
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More immigrant men going to america looking for work. Often, even if they were married they would go ahead., get a job, get settled and send for their wives later.
 

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