NY Titanic sites

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Trent Pheifer

Guest
Hey How is everyone.....it has been awhile since I have been on. I am going on a trip in NYC over my Easter Break. I am trying to make a list of Titanic related sites to visit, right now I have..

Macys
Pier 54
Titanic Light House

I wanted to badly see the Waldorf- Astoria Hotel where the US inquiry took place but I found out it was demolished to make way for the Empire State Building. Does anyone else have any recommendations.

Thanks,Trent
 
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
I have one more question, can you go into Trinity Cemetary to see JJ astors grave??
thanks-trent
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Trent- check out the Battery-Telegraph operator's memorial with Phillips' name on it, South Street Seaport has the Titanic Memorial Lighthouse, Stead Memorial in Central Park, a beautiful Astor Memorial window of the ship in St. JOhn the Divine on Amsterdam Ave, the big steel arch from the Cunard White Star Pier where Carpathia came in is still there off Hudson Hwy, so many places to see...
 

Jan C. Nielsen

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Dec 12, 1999
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There's the International Mercantile Marine Company's building (but I don't know the address). Check an old phonebook. It definitely still exists. The door entrances and so forth have the IMM logo, or design. Also, there's a website that has pictures of all of the New York Titanic sites. But I haven't been able to find it for a long time.
 
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Bob Cruise

Guest
Check out the old Seaman's Institute - now the Rivington Hotel - on West Street and the West Side Highway, looking out on the Hudson River. That's where the crew held the memorial service for all lost (there's a well-known picture of the crew sitting in the building's Common Room - which you can barely make out from the street since the main level's somewhat elevated).

Also - the Arlington Hotel on W. 26th (or 25th) just off of 5th Avenue - where many passengers were put up.

And St. Vincent's hospital on 12th and 7th Avenue - the old wing - where many were taken for treatment.

OHHHH!!!

The old New York offices of the White Star Line, down on Broadway near Battery park. The place is now... a "Radio Shack"(!). For a real historic moment when you go - be sure you bring with you that old photograph of the crowds standing outside waiting for news - you can position yourself in the cobble street and imagine the scene come to life.

For that matter, check out the U.S. Post Office a couple of doors up. That building is the old Cunard office - WOW! The ceiling is Cathedral-like - with friezes of ocean voyages in true Gilded Age excess. Sadly, water leaks have damaged one of the scenes and the U.S. Postal Service apparently is not in the restoring business. Ultimately, the space gives you an insight into the grandeur - and the much different mindset - that was all part of the era.

Bob
 

Robert Berg

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Jan 2, 2005
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There's always Number 9 Broadway, the former White Star Offices--now occupied by Radio Shack. It basically looks the same as seen in the pictures. The picture that shows Mrs. Guggenheim arriving at the White Star Offices to check on her husbands status are still there and unchanged.

The Chelsea Piers (the former Cunard & White Star Docks) still exist, and have been converted to a sporting complex, although smaller boats & yachts still dock there. Go to www.chelseapiers.com and check out the site.

Finally, the iron grill work is all that is left of Pier 54, after it burned down in the 30's--you can barely see the words "Cunard-White Star" across the front of it. The remaining concrete portion (which would have been enclosed) is now used for summertime concerts.
 

Bryan Ciobanu

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Apr 22, 2005
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Hi everyone

I am going to New York (20-21 april 2007) And I wonder if there are any special Titanic memorial places to visit. Museums, artifacts etc.

Any recommendations? ideas?

Thanks

BC.

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in another thread outside of this subtopic, has been moved to the one addressing the same subject. JDT]
 
Sep 26, 2009
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Bryan: Here is a link to a website that lists four Titanic memorials in NYC:

http://www.maint.com/Titanic/

Read the posts in this thread for other iteas. I am not sure if the Wireless Memorial in Battery Park is accessible due to the construction at the WTC site. Also, I recall a stained glass window memorial in one of the big churches, probably St. John the Divine. The location of the hotel where the American Inquiry started is now the Empire State Building, I believe there was a plaque to the Strausses in one of the entrances to Macy's Department store on 34th street. Maybe some NYC message board member will post a message about more memorials in NYC. Have a nice visit to the "Big Apple"! Robert H. Gibbons
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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The "what to see in NYC" question is one that arises periodically. What follows is a compilation, limited largely but not exclusively to Manhattan, based on postings made over the years to various Titanic message boards and mailing lists by Shelley Dziedzic, Jeff Newman, Jane Holeywell, Vera Gillespie, Patrick McSherry, Nellie Torres, Joel Edwards, Carolyn Crapo and myself. If I've missed anything, folks, let me know and I'll add it next time.

1. Titanic's pier was to be 59. It still exists as part of the Chelsea Pier Sports Complex at 23rd St. and the West Side Highway, though the terminal building is gone and the pier is now a driving range. There are some black and white photos of the pier areas and famous steamship arrivals, although there seems to be fewer of them each time I visit.

2. Carpathia, Lusitania and the rest of the Cunard Line called Cunard Pier 54 home; this pier is south of Pier 59, at 12th Street and the Hudson River. It too still exits. The building is gone, though the iron entryway remains. Above where the doors were located, you can still read CUNARD LINE and CUNARD WHITE STAR, one superimposed on the other. You can sometimes go onto the pier, although it's also sometimes used for special events, which restrict access. Pier 54 is part of the Hudson River Park project.

3. The IMM/White Star office in 1912 was at 9 Broadway, now a Radio Shack. IMM later moved down the block to 1 Broadway, which is now a Citibank branch office. There is a plaque on the corner of that building commemorating the history of the site, from Washington to White Star. There are also still "First Class" and "Second Class" signs over the doors, and painted medallions of cities served by IMM line on the facade a couple of floors above street level.

4. The former Bowling Green Post Office, now closed, at 25 Broadway, was once Cunard's New York office (although not in 1912). More information on that building is here on Jeff Newman's web site.

5. In Battery Park, at the south end of Manhattan, there's a Wireless Operators Memorial, dedicated to lost radio operators, including Titanic's Jack Phillips. This memorial may have been temporarily removed, I understand, but I haven't been to the Park in recent months to verify that. It is not, though, affected by the WTC reconstruction.

6. The Cathedral of St. John the Divine is located in upper Manhattan on West 112th Street and Amsterdam Avenue. Inside the Cathedral is a stained glass window in memory of John Jacob Astor. It's on the left side of the Cathedral as you walk toward the front; in the window's lower right corner is Titanic. Both Astor and Madeline Astor are buried in Trinity Cemetery at Broadway and West 155th Street; I think they are the only Titanic folks buried in Manhattan, although quite a few others are buried in other cemeteries in the metropolitan area.

7. At the entrance to the South Street Seaport is the Titanic memorial lighthouse, removed from atop the Seamans' Institute. The seaport also contains several display areas, a museum shop at which maritime-related merchandise and books are available, and several restored sailing ships, including the Wavertree, which was owned by Leyland Lines (of Californian fame).

8. There is a plaque in memory of Ida and Isidor Straus in the 34th Street entrance vestibule of Macy's Department Store (34th Street and Broadway), although this was inaccessible due to renovations the last time I was there. There is also a memorial to Mr. and Mrs. Straus in Straus Park, the strip of concrete or "island" that separates Broadway from West End Avenue at approximately 106th Street in the west side of Manhattan.

9. There's a plaque to Edith Evans in Grace Church at 802 Broadway.

10. The Intrepid Museum, on the Hudson near the Circle Line and the currently-operating passenger ship terminal, is a retired aircraft carrier converted into a museum. The focus of the museum, naturally, is on things military, but there is, for example, a model of Titanic about 2 m. long inside and a propellor from SSUS outside. The Intrepid, though, is currently in Bayonne, New Jersey, undergoing modifications, which will take until the fall of next year.

11. There is a plaque in memory of Emil Taussig at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. I have not verified this.

12. There's a plaque in memory of W.T Stead somewhere in Central Park. Shelley, I think, knows where.

13. There's a plaque on memory of Dr. O'Loughlin in St. Vincent's Hospital in Manhattan. I verified with the hospital's P.R. office a few years ago that it still existed, but I never received a promised photo of it, and do not know if it's publicly accessible.

14. Although not technically a Titanic or ocean liner site and located primarily in Jersey City, Ellis Island is not to be missed. Within the historic site, there are often exhibits about the trans-Atlantic steamships that brought so many European immigrants to America. Even when there isn't a liner oriented exhibit, the fact that Ellis Island was the initial destination of so many of the passengers of the great North Atlantic steamers makes it well worth the trip. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island boat trip, which can be taken either from Liberty State Park in Jersey City or Battery Park in NYC, is also a great way to see upper New York Harbor and the lower Hudson River.

15. Finally, also not directly related to Titanic is the Hudson County Court House in Jersey City, a 15 to 30 minute subway ride from Manhattan. The interior design of the court house completed in 1910 was one of the last major commissions carried out by passenger Francis D. Millet, who also painted two of the large historical murals on the 4th floor.

16. One of the best ways to see the city is from the water. Swimming in the Hudson or East Rivers or New York Bay is not recommended, but fortunately, boats are available. The Circle Line has regular daily cruises around Manhattan; they leave from just south of where the Intrepid was and will be. There are dinner/entertainment cruises on ships called the Spirit of New Jersey (which departs from Weehawken on the New Jersey side of the Hudson) and the Spirit of New York (which departs from the New York side). Particularly during the times of year when sunset occurs during the cruise, the views of the City are terrific.

For still more maritime sights, not necessarily Titanic-related, take a look at Ted Scull's LOWER MANHATTAN WALKING TOUR.
 

Mark Baber

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With respect to the Seamen's Institute mentioned in a couple of the messages in this thread, I need to check some notes I have at my office. A few years back I looked into the claim on the web site that Bob Gibbons provided, and concluded that it's not the building at which Titanic's crew was tended to. I'll update this tomorrow.
 

Mark Baber

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As to the Seamen's Church Institute:

The 1912 Institute, where the lighthouse was originally located, was at 25 South Street, which is on the East River; see this article from The New York Times. This is clearly not the same building as the one which still exists on West Street, which is on the Hudson River, on the other side of Manhattan from South Street. If the West Street building was, in fact, the Seamen's Institute at some point in time, it must have been after the 1912 building at South Street was demolished and before the current facility, on Water Street, adjacent to the South Street Seaport, was built.
 
Sep 26, 2009
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The THS had its first general meeting at the Seamen's Church Institute in 1966 and it was on the East River. The lighthouse was still on top of this building in 1966. The building was subsequently torn down and the lighthouse was moved to the South Street attraction where I believe it is still there today. Robert H. Gibbons
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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Hello, Denise---

After looking at Trent's comprehensive article, and seeing that he refers to the building on the Hudson as the "Institute of Seamen's Friends" rather than the "Seamen's Institute," I've taken a look at contemporaneous news reports, and offer the following revision to what I posted earlier:

In 1912, the building at Jane and West Streets was called the Institute of the American Seamen's Friends Society, a different organization from The Seamen's Church Institute on South Street. There was, indeed, a memorial service held at the West Street Institute on 19 April 1912, although The New York Times reported the next day that the Titanic crew who attended that service had been housed on Lapland, on which many of them would eventually return home, rather than in the building. So this should also be added to the list I provided yesterday.