O God, Our Help in Ages Past...


Andyvskinner

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Jul 26, 2017
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Hi folks,
Wondering if you can help me. I'm trying to find out if the hymn 'Our God, Our Help in Ages Past' was sung during the service on the Carpathia after she rescued the Titanic survivors? I could have sworn I read this somewhere but I may well be mistaken.
I know that is was certainly sung on Titanic on Sunday 14th.
My reason for the interest is that it is Southampton's unofficial hymn, so for it to have been sung on Titanic and Carpathia would be quite fitting.
Many thanks!
 
May 3, 2005
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I have heard that "Eternal Father, Strong To Save" was sung at the morning Service on Titanic.
But there was a "nit-pick" that the verse being heard in "Titanic (1997 )-"For those in peril in the air" - was in error since it had not been written in 1912. It was sung during World War II.
 
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Andyvskinner

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Jul 26, 2017
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Is that right? Didn't know that it hadn't been written! Colonel Archibald Gracie mentioned the OGOHIAP thing and reflects on the irony of the words given what happened later.
 
A

Aaron_2016

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Different versions of the same hymn I believe. 2nd class passenger Lawrence Beesley attended a late night hymn service on Sunday night. He wrote the experience in his book:


'After dinner, Mr. Carter invited all who wished to the saloon, and with the assistance at the piano of a gentleman who sat at the purser's table opposite me (a young Scotch engineer going out to join his brother fruit-farming at the foot of the Rockies), he started some hundred passengers singing hymns. They were asked to choose whichever hymn they wished, and with so many to choose, it was impossible for him to do more than have the greatest favourites sung. As he announced each hymn, it was evident that he was thoroughly versed in their history. No hymn was sung but that he gave a short sketch of its author and in some cases a description of the circumstances in which it was composed. I think all were impressed with his knowledge of hymns and with his eagerness to tell us all he knew of them. It was curious to see how many chose hymns dealing with dangers at sea. I noticed the hushed tone with which all sang the hymn, "For those in peril on the Sea."

'The singing must have gone on until after ten o'clock, when, seeing the stewards standing about waiting to serve biscuits and coffee before going off duty, Mr. Carter brought the evening to a close by a few words of thanks to the purser for the use of the saloon, a short sketch of the happiness and safety of the voyage hitherto, the great confidence all felt on board this great liner with her steadiness and her size, and the happy outlook of landing in a few hours in New York at the close of a delightful voyage; and all the time he spoke, a few miles ahead of us lay the "peril on the sea" that was to sink this same great liner with many of those on board who listened with gratitude to his simple, heartfelt words.'


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May 3, 2005
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Is that right? Didn't know that it hadn't been written! Colonel Archibald Gracie mentioned the OGOHIAP thing and reflects on the irony of the words given what happened later.
The verse ending in "For those in peril in the air" is reported as being added in 1915.

In the 1997 movie "Titanic" it is heard briefly in the background in the scene where "Jack Dawson" is trying to enter to see "Rose Dewitt-Bukater" but is refused and turned away.
 
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Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Robert Heinlein added a verse for astronauts but I don't think it caught on.

Almighty ruler of the all
Whose power extends to great and small,
Who guides the stars with steadfast law,
Whose least creation fills with awe -
Oh grant Thy mercy and Thy grace
To those who venture into space.
 
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