Officers' taxes and pay slips

I know this has been covered many times before on this site but as of today with the current exchange rate 1 pound in 1912 is equal to about $150 US in today. So Murdoch pay of 17 pounds 10 shillings in 1912 would be about $2,625 US a month today or 2,019 british pounds give or take a few dollars. But these numbers don't tell the whole story because they are just inflation based. The purchaseing power of currencies don't always follow inflation. 1 pound in 1912 might have bought more tea and biscuits than 115 pounds would today. If your interested you can look at the link below. They can explain it better than me. Cheers.
 
Last edited:
Steven, Ok, thank you. And i Just read marks link.

I guess we can't believe everything we read on the Internet.

I wonder if WSL dealt with note payments and had their own independent bank notes?
 
I know this has been covered many times before on this site but as of today with the current exchange rate 1 pound in 1912 is equal to about $150 US in today. So Murdoch pay of 17 pounds 10 shillings in 1912 would be about $2,625 US a month today or 2,019 british pounds give or take a few dollars. But these numbers don't tell the whole story because they are just inflation based. The purchaseing power of currencies don't always follow inflation. 1 pound in 1912 might have bought more tea and biscuits than $150 would today. If your interested you can look at the link below. They can explain it better than me. Cheers.

Aly, what country's dollar are you referring to here? The exchange rate between pounds and U.S dollars was 5/1; the two statements you make here use exchange rates of 1300/1 and 97.2/1.
----------------------_-------------------------------------------
I think in pounds because they were British. And WSL paid in pounds? I'm not that good at working things out nor bright. For many years, I am trying to figure out if the officers got more than me. I get $817 a week, $3200 a month. Looking at steves post, I guess Murdoch's monthly wage at 2000 pound a month still equals way more than my $3200 a month? because of price differences -in 2020, we pay triple the price. house prices in 1912 were reasonable price compared to today and even cars prices were a reasonable price in 1912. Also a man's wage in 1912 took care of the whole house hold where as today both partners must work. So my $ 3200 a month is way less than his $2000? His $2000 a month made Murdoch a middle class man? I had read officers had a middle class living.

Thanks. Sorry for all the questions.
 
Steven, Ok, thank you. And i Just read marks link.

I guess we can't believe everything we read on the Internet.

I wonder if WSL dealt with note payments and had their own independent bank notes?
I couldn't say for sure how they paid their crew. I'm sure someone on this site knows that. My ship had a disbursing office and pay window where you could cash your checks. But that was a long time after 1912 and White Star Line. How they did it...???
But in the link below Dave Gittins says (post #23) some of the crew took their pay or some of it in advance so maybe they had a payment office in port.
 
I know this has been covered many times before on this site but as of today with the current exchange rate 1 pound in 1912 is equal to about $150 US in today. So Murdoch pay of 17 pounds 10 shillings in 1912 would be about $2,625 US a month today or 2,019 british pounds give or take a few dollars. But these numbers don't tell the whole story because they are just inflation based. The purchaseing power of currencies don't always follow inflation. 1 pound in 1912 might have bought more tea and biscuits than $150 would today. If your interested you can look at the link below. They can explain it better than me. Cheers.

Aly, what country's dollar are you referring to here? The exchange rate between pounds and U.S dollars was 5/1; the two statements you make here use exchange rates of 1300/1 and 97.2/1.
----------------------_-------------------------------------------
I think in pounds because they were British. And WSL paid in pounds? I'm not that good at working things out nor bright. For many years, I am trying to figure out if the officers got more than me. I get $817 a week, $3200 a month. Looking at steves post, I guess Murdoch's monthly wage at 2000 pound a month still equals way more than my $3200 a month? because of price differences -in 2020, we pay triple the price. house prices in 1912 were reasonable price compared to today and even cars prices were a reasonable price in 1912. Also a man's wage in 1912 took care of the whole house hold where as today both partners must work. So my $ 3200 a month is way less than his $2000? His $2000 a month made Murdoch a middle class man? I had read officers had a middle class living.

Thanks. Sorry for all the questions.
Don't be sorry its interesting. If that $3200 a month you make is in US dollars then you are making about $600 a month more than Murdoch at $2625 did in todays dollars. If your $3200 is in Australian dollars then it equals approx $2285 in todays US dollars or $350 less than him a month. Make sense?
To your other question...probably yes. I would bet his money went further than yours does today. You don't even have to go back that far. When I was a lad in grade school in the 60's I could buy a 12 oz. Coke, a stick of beef jerky and 5 pieces of bubble gum for 25 cents. Then get 2 cents back for the empty bottle. Today that would cost more even adjusted for inflation.That's based on going to the same convenience store I did in those days.
 
Can't say about the merchant marine. On my first ship in the U.S. Navy, in 1961, the crew was paid in cash, less any allotments sent directly to dependents, for purchase of savings bonds, etc. Paydays were well regulated. We were lined up, forbidden to talk, while approaching the pay table. One officer looked up your name and wrote the amount due on a slip of paper, and slid it to the next officer, who counted up the money equal to the amount written on the paper. That second officer turned over the slip of paper and slid the inverted paper and the cash to a third officer. That third officer counted the cash and then flipped over the slip and made sure the amounts agreed. Then, the cash was slid over to the crewman.
 
Don't be sorry its interesting. If that $3200 a month you make is in US dollars then you are making about $600 a month more than Murdoch at $2625 did in todays dollars. If your $3200 is in Australian dollars then it equals approx $2285 in todays US dollars or $350 less than him a month. Make sense?
To your other question...probably yes. I would bet his money went further than yours does today. You don't even have to go back that far. When I was a lad in grade school in the 60's I could buy a 12 oz. Coke, a stick of beef jerky and 5 pieces of bubble gum for 25 cents. Then get 2 cents back for the empty bottle. Today that would cost more even adjusted for inflation.That's based on going to the same convenience store I did in those days.
ok, great. Thank you.
I get $3268 a month Aussie dollars, So I'm making less then him. However, like you said, everything was cheaper back then, and less bills as well. He lived a middle class life, on little more than I earn but I'm classed as a lower classed person, and he was a middle classed person. Just proves everything has blown out of proportion for the average person these days.

I grew up in late 80's and early 90's, I too remember the old 1 cent and two cent coins that you can buy a gold mine for. I guess we are luckier than people living in 100 years time.

Thank you for explaining .
 
Can't say about the merchant marine. On my first ship in the U.S. Navy, in 1961, the crew was paid in cash, less any allotments sent directly to dependents, for purchase of savings bonds, etc. Paydays were well regulated. We were lined up, forbidden to talk, while approaching the pay table. One officer looked up your name and wrote the amount due on a slip of paper, and slid it to the next officer, who counted up the money equal to the amount written on the paper. That second officer turned over the slip of paper and slid the inverted paper and the cash to a third officer. That third officer counted the cash and then flipped over the slip and made sure the amounts agreed. Then, the cash was slid over to the crewman.
In what I read, it seems America was ahead of Britain in regards to how to pay their workers.WSL it seems they paid in coins, while American passengers had bank notes on board.
 
I couldn't say for sure how they paid their crew. I'm sure someone on this site knows that. My ship had a disbursing office and pay window where you could cash your checks. But that was a long time after 1912 and White Star Line. How they did it...???
But in the link below Dave Gittins says (post #23) some of the crew took their pay or some of it in advance so maybe they had a payment office in port.
Thankss. It's good to know
 
Can't say about the merchant marine. On my first ship in the U.S. Navy, in 1961, the crew was paid in cash, less any allotments sent directly to dependents, for purchase of savings bonds, etc. Paydays were well regulated. We were lined up, forbidden to talk, while approaching the pay table. One officer looked up your name and wrote the amount due on a slip of paper, and slid it to the next officer, who counted up the money equal to the amount written on the paper. That second officer turned over the slip of paper and slid the inverted paper and the cash to a third officer. That third officer counted the cash and then flipped over the slip and made sure the amounts agreed. Then, the cash was slid over to the crewman.
Also, as I remember, you didn't draw out all your pay every pay day. You just drew out some of it and let the balance build up.

Most payments, at least in the U.S. Civil Service, are now by "direct deposit" and it is deposited in your account
by "electronic means."
You never see checks or cash.

I didn't have a checking account when I was in the Navy. I think I just got money orders and mailed them home for my parents to deposit in my savings account. Of course this way back during my young and single years.
I don't know how it is today ? Do military service personnel have regular bank accounts ? Especially "short timers" just in for one enlistment ?
 
ok, great. Thank you.
I get $3268 a month Aussie dollars, So I'm making less then him. However, like you said, everything was cheaper back then, and less bills as well. He lived a middle class life, on little more than I earn but I'm classed as a lower classed person, and he was a middle classed person. Just proves everything has blown out of proportion for the average person these days.

I grew up in late 80's and early 90's, I too remember the old 1 cent and two cent coins that you can buy a gold mine for. I guess we are luckier than people living in 100 years time.

Thank you for explaining .
Your welcome. Yes things have changed a lot. In the 60's and 70's a guy could work at a gas station and still afford a wife and kids with a sole income. Granted they weren't living high on the hog but it was doable. Today that's almost impossible. But like you said today there are more expenses we didn't have back then. And probably even less in 1912. I was lucky enough to retire debt free so to speak. You always will have your monthly bills and taxes. A big chunk of my bills are stuff I could do without if necessary. I.E...sat tv ,internet, smart phone, insurance on a bunch of toys to keep them street legal..all stuff they didn't have in1912. Oh and high medical insurance. Back then you paid the doctor in cash or chickens. Of course there was a lot that wasn't good in those days too. Mostly no antibiotics and unsafe food and water to consume. I read somewhere that around 1900 1 million people died every year from food poisoning. I would have to look it up but also the average lifespan was like 15 years or so less than today.
 
Last edited:
Also, as I remember, you didn't draw out all your pay every pay day. You just drew out some of it and let the balance build up.

Most payments, at least in the U.S. Civil Service, are now by "direct deposit" and it is deposited in your account
by "electronic means."
You never see checks or cash.

I didn't have a checking account when I was in the Navy. I think I just got money orders and mailed them home for my parents to deposit in my savings account. Of course this way back during my young and single years.
I don't know how it is today ? Do military service personnel have regular bank accounts ? Especially "short timers" just in for one enlistment ?
When I was in during the 70's the Navy Federal Credit Union was popular. It's where I had my account. We got checks every 2 weeks. I remember I tried to get a phone credit card when I was in. This was when Ma Bell ran everything. There were no portable phones like today. Anyway they basically laughed at me. Said to get a phone credit card you had to be an E-6 with at least 2 years left on an enlistment or something like that. When I would call my girlfriend back home I had to take a bag of quarters to the payphone. But today it's a lot like any other job at least as financial stuff goes. There are a lot more options today than we had..internet banking, prepaid credit cards, cheap long distance calling...ect. A lot of it is more convenient but I will say I was kind of shocked when I found that my grand nephews and nieces in high school had their own credit cards...spoiled little bastards...:)
 
Last edited:
Your welcome. Yes things have changed a lot. In the 60's and 70's a guy could work at a gas station and still afford a wife and kids with a sole income. Granted they weren't living high on the hog but it was doable. Today that's almost impossible. But like you said today there are more expenses we didn't have back then. And probably even less in 1912. I was lucky enough to retire debt free so to speak. You always will have your monthly bills and taxes. A big chunk of my bills are stuff I could do without if necessary. I.E...sat tv ,internet, smart phone, insurance on a bunch of toys to keep them street legal..all stuff they didn't have in1912. Oh and high medical insurance. Back then you paid the doctor in cash or chickens. Of course there was a lot that wasn't good in those days too. Mostly no antibiotics and unsafe food and water to consume. I read somewhere that around 1900 1 million people died every year from food poisoning. I would have to look it up but also the average lifespan was like 15 years or so less than today.
Geez, 1 million people a year that died from food poisoning plus others died of other illness. Scary.

Also they didn't have a car to run. Only the rich had cars. These days, every Joe blow has a car
 
When I was in during the 70's the Navy Federal Credit Union was popular. It's where I had my account. We got checks every 2 weeks. I remember I tried to get a phone credit card when I was in. This was when Ma Bell ran everything. There were no portable phones like today. Anyway they basically laughed at me. Said to get a phone credit card you had to be an E-6 with at least 2 years left on an enlistment or something like that. When I would call my girlfriend back home I had to take a bag of quarters to the payphone. But today it's a lot like any other job at least as financial stuff goes. There are a lot more options today than we had..internet banking, prepaid credit cards, cheap long distance calling...ect. A lot of it is more convenient but I will say I was kind of shocked when I found that my grand nephews and nieces in high school had their own credit cards...spoiled little bastards...:)

Sounds like there has always been some kind of discrimination against the lower ranks in the military of the mention of the requirements for the phone credit card of an E-6 and so forth.

I remember when our ship was stationed at San Diego , a group of us "ET's "got together and rented a car to take a trip to visit the Mount Palomar Observatory. The car rental agency wouldn't rent to anything less than an E-5.

Rank discrimination ! :-( I was the only E-5 in the O-E Division so I got to be the chauffeur ! :)

I remember when going home on leave I would always take the train out of Los Angeles . They had a room at Union Station with telephone booths (payphones)for making long distance calls. You either had to have that bag of quarters or call collect. Luckily my parents were always glad to hear from me that I was on my way home and were glad to take a collect call. I guess I was just lucky in not having my own personal cell phone like everyone has today.

All of my nieces have their own cell phones as well as their own credit cards. :)
 
Last edited:
Geez, 1 million people a year that died from food poisoning plus others died of other illness. Scary.

Also they didn't have a car to run. Only the rich had cars. These days, every Joe blow has a car
And just think......How many millions of people died from those "other illnesses " ? Even more scary !
They probably considered themselves lucky if they even had a horse, much less as having a horse and buggy ! :)
 
Last edited:
Back
Top