OK Now For the WORST Titanic Movie Votes Please


Jerry Nuovo

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Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams in character as Laverne and Shirley.I have heard that at the time Laverne and Shirley was on network TV,Penny and Cindy really could not get along with each other and were literally fighting each other at Paramount Studios where Laverne and Shirley was filmed.The youtube link which showed the Captain and Tenille singing Muskrat Love.When I was last aboard the QE2 in January 2006 the guest lecturer was a man who served in the U.S.Army and he would be at the White House in his dress Army uniform when V.I.P.'s would visit the White House.Around the time when Gerald Ford was the President,the Queen of England was visiting the White House and the Captain and Tenille were at the White House to entertain the first family and their guests who in this case was the Queen of England who is Queen Elizabeth the second.The Captain and Tenille started singing that repulsive song Muskrat Love.When the song ended everyone applauded except the Queen.The lecturer explained that the Queen did not like a song about rodents having sex.Come to thing about it I do agree with her.This is such a stupid song.
 

John Clifford

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Now it's my turn to note Jim's comments about repressed memories:
1. "Wonderama": I remember it, in the 1970s: Bob McAllister with the "Exercise" and "Mystery Kid" routines, and guest stars Paul Lynde and Jo Anne Worley, and the "Kids Are People, Too" Anthem;
2. "Let's Be Friends": the infomercials featuring a kid from somewhere in the US ("My name is Jim. Let's be friends"), describing his or her hometown area;
3. "Laverne and Shirley": I can remember when they were introduced on "Happy Days". Cindy Williams and Penny Marshall apparently did reconcile, but Cindy's career stalled: a few years ago she did an op-ed piece for The Washington Times, decrying what she saw as high pay raises for members of the US Military, and a Reservist delivered a prize-winning rebuttal;
3. I also remember seeing Marion Ross and the actor who played Henry Mitchell in the "Dennis the Menace" series, playing the family doctors on one of the early episodes of "The Brady Bunch", and that was before Barry Williams developed "an interesting idea of whom he should date" (if you don't know what I am referring to, "Don't enquire!!!");
4. The Captain and Tenille: I, too, did not care for "Muskrat Love". What was funnier, though, was the time Toni Tenille was scheduled to sing at Dodger Stadium, and her voice was broadcast before she even opened her mouth (poor dubbing). A sportscaster commented that that was the beginning of many a bad moment for the LA Dodgers, that day.

Now all we need is a TITANIC parody, where we could capture some "classic tributes". Imagine:
1. "Mom!! My play-dough has turned brown!!";
2. "Rose" is seen with her "Pet Rock";
3. John Travolta in his white suit, sing "Ba Ba Ba, Ba-Barbarino" (for many of us who heard "Babar-inn", instead of "Barbara Ann"). Yes, that was featured on a "Welcome Back Kotter" episode (when it became taboo to mention that John Travolta's character, in "Carrie", was killed in the exploding car scene);
4. We won't, however, go with bell-bottom pants or leisure suits (try to imagine Billy or Leo so dressed).
 

Jim Kalafus

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>The lecturer explained that the Queen did not like a song about rodents having sex.

When that song first came out, circa 1976, my older cousins gleefully ruined it for me
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by pointing out that the watery, synthetic, muskrat "love calls" sounded a lot like the onset of an attack of diarrhea. Perhaps Prince Phillip had previously shared the same thoughts with the queen. BTW, listening to that song as an adult, I realise just how correct my cousins were.

>Bob McAllister with the "Exercise"

Remember how at the end of each verse he'd yell "..and FREEZE!" and the camera would do psychedelic, au-go-go, fast pull ins and pull outs (in time to the circa 1966 horn riff) on various hapless kids frozen in a Jumping Jack posture? One of my relatives was that hapless kid. Even in 1970, I knew that was going to be branded as "queer" (to use the au courant term) by the schoolyard crowd the following day.

>Jo Anne Worley,

A friend of mine saw her on Broadway a few weeks ago, as a surprise 'fill in' star in The Drowsy Chaperone. So...be warned...she's still out there.

>"Let's Be Friends":

Oh good grief! "Grandpa, what is prejudice?" "Yada yada yada....who called you prejudiced" "Jimmy" "Who is Jimmy?" "He's my Jewish friend." "Then you ARE prejudiced~ because you think of Jimmy as your Jewish friend, and not as your friend." "This message has been brought to you by the Church of the Latter Day Saints."

>a few years ago she did an op-ed piece for The Washington Times, decrying what she saw as high pay raises for members of the US Military,

Oh great. The world was WAITING for Shirley Feeney to weigh in on the heavy issues, and thanks to the Washington Times she finally was given her forum. I can only hope that Eddie "The Big Ragoo" Mekka will soon surface to explain global warming to me.

>playing the family doctors on one of the early episodes of "The Brady Bunch",

Do we keep the male doctor the boys always used, or the female doctor the girls always used? And, how do we get 22 minutes of material out of this plotline?

>"an interesting idea of whom he should date"

Well, he struck out with Maureen McCormick on the QE2, so I am assuming that you refer to his earlier date with "mom."

"Ba Ba Ba, Ba-Barbarino" (for many of us who heard "Babar-inn", instead of "Barbara Ann"). Yes, that was featured on a "Welcome Back Kotter" episode

Several early episodes, in fact. The one I remember best was the hard hitting- literally- very special episode in which he jumps onto a gymnast's horse and begions doing that routine and the gym teacher punches him. Just as we all wanted to do. Speaking of how standards of "good taste" have changed since circa 1977....I remember my mom being quite offended by the "Kotter" episode in which Mrs Kotter is hired to teach a controversial, opposed by the parents, sex ed course. By coincidence, the "kids" steal her film projector to watch a porno loop called "The Passionate Plumber." The Concerned Parents group is given a "demo" of what Mrs Kotter's sex ed course will consist of, and are shown "The Passionate Plumber" which Mr. Kotter's idiot students forgot to remove from the projector. THESE days, Mrs. Kotter would be brought up on charges, at the very least, because in order to protect Those Lovable Rogues, she lies and says that she uses "The Passionate Plumber" as a tool to teach her students the difference between responsible sex and "lust." And, of course, the Concerned Parents Group accepts it. My parents REALLY did not accept that as Family Viewing Fare, and Kotter went off the playlist.

As for the Titanic parody- with 1970s references- I am going to INSIST that pert, cocaine addled, Lauren Tewes,and pert, cocaine addled, Mackenzie Phillips, be given a Love Boat~esque subplot.
 

Jim Kalafus

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AND THE ABSOLUTE WORST: Now, you'd think that the phallic Dole Banana commercial, supermarket perv Mr Whipple meeting toilet paper groupies, and the Enjoli superwoman jingle were as low as 1970s pop-culture could sink in its depiction of women. But, it got worse. How bad? Check it out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7b7ipAy7ygc

The women are she-imps of hell who not only tear at the poor guy's clothing, but also pelt his chest hair with glitter. No wonder why at various points in this video clip he slaps and kicks them.....and, as you'll see, the poor guy only JUST escapes. This song got limited club play back then and, admittedly, was fun to dance to~ and the video DOES capture how hot the "Coke ho" look of 1978-80 could be, so it's not totally worthless~ but its principal point of interest is in demonstrating that as late as 1979/1980 it was, if not exactly acceptable, not fordidden to show a woman being slapped around in the context of mass-market entertainment.

So, again, give thanks for the inclusion of snotty Barbie female scientists....things could be a lot worse.
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Aye-yi-yi-yi...Oy! It's amazing how far we've come....or have we? A lot of the now popular rap stuff includes even worse objectification of women - which I shall not post a link to here.

Yes, even fleeting screen moments of women like Dr. Johnston making important contributions to the science of Titanic are great strides from what used to be not that long ago. Notice on the Robert Ballard documentary from National Geographic circa 1985-6 there are no women seen or featured. Heard perhaps, "Is it really? This is it! Look at that thing!", but nothing else.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>AND THE ABSOLUTE WORST:<<

Ohhhhhh....noooooooo!!!!! Not the bloody Village People!!!! Not that!
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>>It's amazing how far we've come....or have we?<<

We have?

I've been catching that hair restoration advert lately with the usual testimonials, and in the background, music that sounds like a rip off variation of Copeland's Hoe Down. If there's a Hell, the people who come up with this stuff must be the demons who torment the inmates who are coming to Earth to get a head start on the work.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>It's amazing how far we've come....or have we? A lot of the now popular rap stuff includes even worse objectification of women

Well, we have come far, because although rap DOES in many cases take objectification to extreme lengths, rap is also a highly~ shall we say~ segregated art form, and easy for its detractors to avoid because (with the possible exception of annoying faux-rap TV jingles)it has not permeated society at large except in its blandest, most Madison Avenue friendly form. And, the vast majority of our society finds the ideals put forward by rap to be unacceptable. Which is why it remains the music of choice among ~shall we say~ genitally challenged teen white boys from suburbia, but has never broken out into large scale acceptance.

One could not say that about any of the clips from the youth that I posted.

There was a LOT of (justifiable) anger among women during my youth because, if I may be blunt, the dominant images put forth (and all but inescapable) were all so unflattering. Either you were a demented creature who danced through the house sprinkling Shake n Vac and singing; a comically shrill "Woman's Libber" with stringy hair and Gloria Steinem glasses who -invariably- got put in her place, or a glorified whore who either simulated oral sex with a banana to advertise fruit, or got slapped around by a Village Person. I remember how my college-educated mother would be enfuriated by ads that (then) seemed comical, and TV and movie segments that seemed (then) innocuous, and would specifically refuse to buy products whose ads crossed the line. The 1970s were the last decade where the old stereotypes were not just onmipresent but also socially "acceptable" unless- of course- you were a woman.

It was an odd, sad time. My mother got through it by continuing her education and eventually returning to work. I had a lot of friends with mothers who "coped," if that word can be used in this context, by staying buzzzed on tranquilizers 24/7. When mixed with the "welcome home dear" cocktail when hubby came home, the end result could be disastrous in several ways. Even more disastrous was when "stressed mommy" would take TWO "Vals" to smooth over the rough edges on Monday and find herself sans tranquilizers for the last two days of her prescription ~ PMS times 200, to say the least. I was lucky NOT to have anything like that on the home front...such was life in suburbia in the 1970s.

So, although there are still areas in which improvements are needed, the media at least is an infinitely better place now than it was 30 years ago.
 
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sharon rutman

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Just pick out any Titanic documentary dvd at random and with the exception of female survivors and female relatives of survivors women engaged in any sort of serious Titanic research are non-existent! You have the usual round up of male suspects including Voice of God Male voiceovers, male writers, male directors, male scientists--the list is endless. We women just can't escape Rose's too tight corset and we become invisible in the process.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Sharon, what are you looking for? Affirmative Action in documentary making? Further, do you honestly think that repeating this Broadly Generalitic line of yours will somehow make it so when quite a bit has already been penned here to show just how misleading and inaccurate it is?

By the way, when are you going to make an on-point response to the question posed by Jim Kalafus as well as myself earlier in the thread? Avoiding them doesn't make them go away.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>Further, do you honestly think that repeating this Broadly Generalitic line of yours....

Michael- Don't bother. You can't fight it. As you would with a cantankerous grandmother, just say "That's nice, dear" and then carry on.

>Just pick out any Titanic documentary dvd at random and with the exception of female survivors and female relatives of survivors women engaged in any sort of serious Titanic research are non-existent!

That's nice, dear.

Main Entry: idée fixe
Pronunciation: ()-d-fks
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural idées fixes a usually delusional idea that dominates the whole mental life during a prolonged period (as in certain mental disorders) -- called also fixed idea
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Michael- Don't bother. You can't fight it.<<

Probably right about that. Still, it would be nice to recieve some substantive replies to the questions we posed, but the fact that they were avoided says quite a lot as well.
 
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OK, Sharon has some strong views about the lack of women in prominent positions so let’s tackle this head on. Perhaps they simply ain’t good enough. After all during the progressive 19th century I can’t think of any stand out examples of female contributions to the furtherance of the human race other than Marie Curie’s (and the brains behind that achievement I suspect belonged to husband Pierre). Oh — there was also Flo Nightingale who mopped a few brows.

Despite being given equal educational opportunities during the 2nd half of the 20th century they ain’t making an awful lot of progress relative to man. (Has anyone seen a woman on the moon? Hey, perhaps we can all contribute towards a rocket and send Sharon there to study moon rocks, conveniently forgetting of course to include a return booster!)

If you asked 100 men which they’d prefer, spending an afternoon studying rusticles or going shopping on the High Street most I’m sure would plump for the rusti’s (and the peace & quiet that goes with it) whereas if you asked 100 women the same question the majority would have their handbags packed before you could say ‘no you can’t borrow my credit card’.

So there you have it. When it’s boiled down the lowest denominator men in general use their free time on education, study and the furtherance of mankind, thus creating opportunities for themselves. Women shop. Sad but true.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>OK, Sharon has some strong views about the lack of women in prominent positions so let’s tackle this head on.

Well, I think the overwhelming problem that has been manifesting itself in this discussion, and in several others in a similar vein, is that some people find it more edifying to complain than they do to work towards some sort of solution.

In another discussion with Ms Rutman, in which she was decrying the lack of scholarly attention paid to the Titanic's Jewish passengers, I suggested that she take action and provide such a work of scholarship. Perhaps a magazine article. Perhaps a thesis. Her response (the last direct response I ever got from her, btw) was along the lines of "I'm not interested in doing something like that and don't have the time anyway." In short- "I'd rather whine."

That seems to be the general pattern that discussion with her take on. A bold statement, usually with either undertones or bold dollops of aggrieved indignation, followed by a complete lack of any concrete points if anyone bothers to respond.

Since this thread was beaten to death over several dozen postings, during the course of which she said virtually NOTHING of any substance to either reenforce her position or rebut those who contested what she said, I can only assume that this return to virtually the same tired, careworn, wheeze of a 1970s sentiment was done out of a borderline-masochistic need for negative attention on Sharon's part....equalled only by my own masochistic tendency to actually open these threads when they appear.

So, Sharon having successfully coaxed The Mummy from his crypt, let me ask again:

"Sharon- what is a typical male perspective?"
"Sharon- when it it ever right to call a woman "Barbie?"
"Sharon- When can we expect to see your scholarly work on the women of the Titanic?"
 

John Clifford

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In the meantime, Jim, we can also remember some more crazy moments that we also discussed:

1. Who invented the term "wakadoo"? I still recall that from the "Kids Are People, Too!" theme from "Wonderama";
2. The other "Wonderama" moment: "The Mystery Kid" segment, showing a picture of someone doing their best to ruin a family Christmas picture, before that person is brought forward in disguise with several other kids. Both Paul Lynde and Jo Anne Worley played along with that, as I recall, wearing a costume;
3. Jo Anne Worley: Yes, I remember she was in a local stage production of "The Wizard of Oz": she enjoyed playing the Wicked Witch of the West, so she has enjoyed playing various roles, especially ones where the actor can "ham it up", big time;
4. "Welcome Back Kotter": the episodes you mentioned earlier must have been in the fourth season of the show, which both Gabe Kaplan and Marcia Strassman admitted not only ended the series, but also kept it from being replayed in reruns, as a station always saw the afternoon ratings drop when the fourth season episodes came on (when John Travolta basically was "The Star" and Gabe Kaplan was basically non-existent). By that time, "Welcome Back Kotter" was off our TV privileges, too;
5. Yes, I was thinking of Barry Williams first developing a crush on Maureen McCormick, especialy when the Hawaii episodes of "The Brady Bunch" were filmed, and it was after that he asked Florence Henderson out on a date. When they did a "Brady Bunch" stars segment on "The Weakest Link", several years ago, Florence Henderson, when voting off Barry Williams, commented "I'll never go on another date with you!!";
6. David Cassidy, when called back for "The Partridge Family", was surprised to see his stepmother in the studio, as she explained "I'm going to be playing your momma";
7. Actor Dave Madden stated that some of the episodes of "The Partridge Family" featured antics that, nowadays, would have had his character, Ruben Kincaid, thrown in jail, especially when it involved him dealing with the characters of Danny and Keith; and
8. Can anyone who grew up in the 60s and 70s ever forget the Sid and Marty Kroft kids series "H.R. Pufnstuff" and "Lidsville"? It's interesting how those kids could be missing for so long, as nowadays there would be Amber Alerts and "Picture Them Home" postings. Many of us will remember the late Charles Nelson Reilly, Billy Hayes, and Jack Wild mostly from their roles in those shows, as well as noting Butch Patrick from both "Lidsville" and "The Munsters".
 
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sharon rutman

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John-what does all this TV nostalgia have to do with the Titanic? That was always one of my pet peeves--getting off topic and this is way, way off the mark.

Jim--attacking me personally sounds very, very defensive on your part. Can I at least clear a block of time after I graduate with my MA next year before I can think of wise scholarly thoughts. But between now and June 2008, I have to be focused on writing touchy-feely papers for the English professor so I can order my cap and gown. I'm not going anywhere and even if I was working on something, I never, ever share it because that would be jinxing a project.
 

Inger Sheil

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Jim, I share your eagerness to see answers to those questions:
quote:

"Sharon- what is a typical male perspective?"
"Sharon- when it it ever right to call a woman "Barbie?"
"Sharon- When can we expect to see your scholarly work on the women of the Titanic?"
As well as specific examples of all those snotty scientists. I share your pessimism on whether such answers will be forthcoming. I do like the injured tone, though - coming from someone who personally denigrates a female academic as a "barbie" it strikes a particularly entertaining note of irony.


Steve, if I were to ask 100 blokes whether they'd prefer to spend an afternoon's quiet contemplation of rusticles or whether they'd like to spend it watching sport or playing shoot-em-ups on the computer (depending on age demographics), I'm confident the overwhelming majority would not be furthering our knowledge of micro-organisms at work.

Personally, I have no trouble both shopping and focusing on "education, studying and the furtherance of humankind". No doubt that's due to the long-observed talent that women have for multitasking. Don't need to borrow anyone's credit or debit cards to do it, either - that's one of the joys of having a career and independant income.

Focusing exclusively on female Nobel Prize winners for science, we find a broad range of achievement:

Marie Sklodowska Curie (Physics, 1903; and Chemistry, 1911) - you rightfully mention this exceptional woman, the only person ever to win two Nobel prizes.

Irene Curie (Chemistry, 1935)

Gerty Radnitz Cori (Biochemistry, 1947)

Barbara McClintock (Medicine, 1983)

Maria Goeppert Mayer (Physics, 1963)

Rita Levi-Montalicini (Medicine, 1986)

Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (Chemistry, 1964)

Gertrude Elion (Medicine, 1988)

Rosalyn Sussman Yalow (Medicine, 1977)

Christiane Nusslein-Volhard (Medicine, 1995)

Linda Buck(Medicine, 2004)

This does not look at contributions in the arts, diplomacy and broad contributions to humanity, as to name female achievers across broad fields would take far too much time.

Looking specifically at maritime history, I've outlined elsewhere the prominent role women have today in the professional field of maritime studies. I'll be happy to reiterate specific examples of women who are leading in this field. Where there are imbalances, such as in the popular hobbyist area of the Titanic, I think Jim nails it:
quote:

Well, I think the overwhelming problem that has been manifesting itself in this discussion, and in several others in a similar vein, is that some people find it more edifying to complain than they do to work towards some sort of solution.
If it really bothers someone so excruciatingly that their gender is supposedly under-represented in their area of interest, then research and publish. As many women are already doing - my latest article, due to be published in a maritime history journal, should hit the stands before Christmas.​
 

Jim Kalafus

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>Can anyone who grew up in the 60s and 70s ever forget the Sid and Marty Kroft kids series "H.R. Pufnstuff" and "Lidsville"?

John- if you can stomach it- there is a film of the triumphant 1973 Krofft extravaganza at the Hollywood Bowl now available for retro viewing. Highlights, if that term may be used, include musical performances by the late Jack Wilde, Johnny Whittaker, and the Brady Bunch Kids who perform "Proud Mary" and a ton of oldies. Best part is, at the end they dim the lights for a false ending, and when they bring them up you can see what is quite clearly a stampede of parents dragging their kids out.

My parents hated Krofft, and so I saw it perhaps twice in first run.

H.R. Puffnstuf, as you may recall if you had older siblings who were au courant on urban legends, stood for "Hand Rolled Puffin' Stuff." In that context, Lidsville requires no further explanation. I knew the hand Rolled Puffin' Stuff quote at, like, age 7, but did not know what it meant for probably 5 years beyond that point.

>"The Mystery Kid" segment, showing a picture of someone doing their best to ruin a family Christmas picture, before that person is brought forward in disguise with several other kids.

Not to be confused with the segment in which six kids had to be matched to their mothers. Or, the crown jewel of Wonderama- the Snake Can Game. I'll have to use a slur here- but in strictly 1976 spirit- we always called the Ross Apollo Bicycle with Banana Saddle (the BIG PRIZE in that game) "totally gay." No kid would be caught dead on that thing- covered as it was with all of the plastic and streamers and stupid looking doo-dads you'd carefully break off of your OWN bike (if your parents bought you a bike thus festooned) before anyone else saw them.

On a progressive note- Wonderama was the first kids TV show I recall where black kids and Asian kids got picked to be in the games a lot.

And, at the end, how Bob McAllister would excitedly reel off the contents of the "Gift Bag" every kid got to take home- Lenders bagelettes and a Lactona Toothbrush and, of course, one of those catgut necklaces with a red and white plastic apple core hanging off of it- later replaced by the same necklace with a mini-Lenders bagel charm. We'd sit there watching and sarcastically comment "B....F....deal." during the ritual presentation of the gift bag.

Abba on Wonderama. I want- for whatever reason- to watch that episode. Older relatives want to watch the Sunday Morning Violent Movie. This is 1976 and so there is only one television. Queer slurs are soon hurled at both Abba and those who like them. A surreal childhood memory is of the ensuing hurling of punches and rolling around on the living room floor as those who want to watch Abba and those who want to watch Bruce Lee settle the issue by drawing blood. With- I swear to God, Mamma Mia playing in the background. Resolved, as those things so frequently were, by the entrance of a Mom figure who turned the TV off and said those immortal 1970s words- "go outside and play." Nowadays we'd all be dosed with Ritalin and sent to behavior modification classes. Years later, a significant other was so amused by that tale that an original copy of that episode appeared in my mailbox a few weeks later....so at the age of 32 I finally got to see what I missed at age 9.

>Actor Dave Madden stated that some of the episodes of "The Partridge Family" featured antics that, nowadays, would have had his character, Ruben Kincaid, thrown in jail,

On the pilot episode, he pops a lot of tranquilizers. Ha! many diffetnt episodes invloved him about to...uh...procreate with stewardess/girlfriend Bonnie Kleinschmidt (WHY do I remember that name?) only to discover at the last second that a junior Partridge or two was in the apartment. That show was creepy- even as a kid one picked up on a lot of the weirdnesses.

>Barry Williams first developing a crush on Maureen McCormick, especialy when the Hawaii episodes of "The Brady Bunch"

Well, she was HOT! So, too was Eve Plumb, but only for the last two seasons. Cindy, at best, reminded me of the sort of Elf Christmas ornament that looks like it is supposed to be cute but which, in fact, looks MORE like something that at the stroke of midnight comes to life and kills all of the children in the house.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>Can I at least clear a block of time after I graduate with my MA next year

Yes, you can, but no, you may not. If you have time to endlessly post the same question, you CERTAINLY have time to address the questions Mr. Standart, Inger and myself have posed to you.

And, as for it being a personal attack. Sharon- you couldn't POSSIBLY have expected anything other than more of the same when you posted- again- the tired sentiments you've already covered at great length on both this thread and the previous one. Unless you were erroneously told that everyone involved with the original discussion other than yourself had...oh...died... in the intervening month, you could ONLY have revived the question in the hopes of generating more...abuse.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>John-what does all this TV nostalgia have to do with the Titanic?

Not a hell of a lot...but when you reduced the conversation to a level of irreversible stupidity by refusing to discuss the very theme YOU chose to bring up then, as conversations do, it began to ramble.

>That was always one of my pet peeves--getting off topic and this is way, way off the mark.

So, Miss Let's Keep On Topic- LET'S KEEP ON TOPIC. Answer the questions:

Who are the snotty scientists?

What exactly is the "cowboy mentality" among them?

When is it ever right to call a woman who, BTW, has a higher degree than YOU do, a "Barbie?" Actually, when is it EVER right to call a woman a "Barbie?"

What is a typical male perspective?

When can we expect to see your work on the Titanic's women?

Are you enjoying the attention?

There. Now we are nicely back on track.

>attacking me personally sounds very, very defensive on your part

No...I am being utterly offensive- one cannot "defend" oneself when one is talking to someone who hasn't actually SAID anything.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>my latest article, due to be published in a maritime history journal, should hit the stands before Christmas

Congrats! Is it dull, trivial, and pointless, and does it do nothing to further the human race, and do you go out of your way to be snotty, obscure and alienating in your narrative? Or do you giggle and lose your train of thought frequently throughout? Or, as Dr. Johnson is accused of doing, did you manage to reach both ends of the unflattering stereotype spectrum
happy.gif
?
 

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