Olympic Passenger Lists 1911- 1935


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Matt Endacott

Guest
Does anyone have any Passenger Lists dated from either the Olympic's first or last voyage, or even any from her sailing days. I have two in my collection, one from 1913 the other 1914 yet i'd be quite interested in those from the 30's.
Thanks
 
Mar 28, 2002
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I can probably get a copy of a June (July?) 1911 crossing, I think Olympic's second voyage. Titanic survivor George Brereton appears as a passenger.

Cheers,

Boz
 
Jan 29, 2001
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Matt:

I am currently at our Nevada State Library and Archives where I am so fortunate they also have the NY Times on microfilm.

I pulled the OLYMPIC's passenger list up for you
from the June 21, 1911 paper.

Heading is page 1 column 1..."Giant Olympic in at midnight" Under a sub-heading same column is "The Olympic's Passengers - A full List of those on board the new mammoth l'ner."

Fortunately the list is alphabetical, it list Bradshaw then Brewster. No Brereton. Perhaps as with Iain's noting, George Brereton made the return-half of Olympic's maiden voyage.

However a gentleman of noteriety was mentioned in column one...Col. Thomas Denny of the Dumbarton Firm of shipbuilders made the trip to watch the performance of the triple engines.

BTW, I have a prized 1st-class menu from an OLYMPIC voyage in 1927. Very beautiful cover with the liner's name in gold leaf, and in great condition!

Michael A. Cundiff
USA
 
Feb 21, 2003
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How about the Manifest/Passenger Lists of her 3rd Class/Steerage passengers from her 1911-1935 crossings to New York? Are they available too?
 
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Matt Endacott

Guest
Hey,
Is anyone aware of or been in contact with any living passengers of the Olympic, perhaps from voyages dated around the time of the Titanic? Im guessing since she was scrapped as early ago as 1935 there must be quite a number of living passengers. It would be interesting to talk to these people to gain an insight into travelling aboard an Olympic class liner, as their journeys would have been much similiar to those experienced by Titanic passengers.
Any around at all? Of particular interest would be any from the maiden voyage in 1911.
Best Regards,
Matt
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
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I would really like to know how many are still alive (those that were on board the Olympic on her maiden voyage)!
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi,

I would really like to know how many are still alive (those that were on board the Olympic on her maiden voyage)!

If the lack of progress of recent research is any indication, it's something that will prove impossible to find out -- other than using statistics to form a brief estimate. It's hard enough to track down Olympic passengers from 1911-35, as Daniel Klistorner will be able to confirm. Fortunately, some leads appear to be bearing fruit.

One has to wonder how many Titanic passengers (such as those very young children) would have known in later years that they were on her maiden voyage, had she not sank. After all, at a few months old you don't know. Even someone just six years old in 1911 would be one hundred. Still, it's an interesting question as you've said.

Best wishes,

Mark.
 
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trevor ward powell

Guest
It is of interest that last Janurary, a maiden voyage passenger list for the Olympic sold on ebay for over $700.00
 

Peggy Gavan

Member
Dec 20, 2005
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I am writing a children's book about a famous cat (The French Hatching Cat) who sailed from France to New York in June 1911. The approximate arrival date of this cat in New York -- June 21, 1911 -- makes me believe that she was a passenger on the Olympic's maiden voyage. She was possibly traveling with Fernand Akoud, Director of the ethnological departments of the Paris Zoological Gardens at the Jardin d'Acclimation, or Nicholas Schenck, General Manager of Palisades Amusement Park. I am trying to find out if anyone knows whether M. Akoud or Mr. Schenck was aboard this ship, and/or if a large angora cat was on board. I imagine they would have been traveling by first- or second-class. (Would also love to know what a cat would be fed on such a ship, or any other info that would add color and history to my story!)
 
Aug 28, 2005
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Hey everybody. I'd like to let you know that I found the entire passenger list from the Olympic's maiden voyage and I'm working on a final copy for this site. I'll post it as soon as it's finished.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Christian

I once ordered the entire passenger list from NARA on microfilm a few years ago (I actually got lists for her first 3 NY arrivals), but never found the time to take a proper look at it. I'm sure you could browse through it on the Ellis Island web site (providing you find a passenger who was on the maiden voyage). What copy of the list did you get and where did you find it?

Daniel.
 
Aug 28, 2005
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Daniel,

I did find this list from the research website for Ellis Island (www.ellisisland.org). What I did is I logged in and did an advanced search for any passengers arriving onboard the Olympic in 1911. I then went down the list and found one passenger that arrived in New York on June 21, 1911, which was the Olympic's arrival date for her maiden voyage. I then accessed the text version of the ship's complete manifest and printed up each page of the manifest (63 in all) and I counted a total of 1,417 names.

Actually, here's the number of passengers I have from each class boarding at each port of call. If you have the original list, compare these numbers to yours.

First Class:
266 boarded at Southampton, followed by 149 more at Cherbourg and five more at Queenstown, total of 420.

Second Class:
90 boarded at Southampton, followed by 135 at Cherbourg, and 16 at Queenstown, total of 241.

Third Class:
542 boarded at Southampton, followed by 167 at Cherbourg and 47 more at Queenstown, total of 756.

What I did notice when I first looked at the Ellis Island records for the survivors from the Titanic and I noticed that each list is a group of passengers that not only boarded at the same port, but also were from the same class. I put the pages in numerical order and was able to separate the passengers into their classes.

<table border=1>[tr][td]
attachment_icon.gif
list of pages of Olympic Manifest
Maiden Voyage Record Stats.xlr (15.4 k)[/td][/tr][/table]​
(YOU NEED A SPREADSHEET TO VIEW THIS FILE, MOST LIKELY THE MICROSOFT WORKS ONE!)

So far, I have finished all the list for passengers boarding at Southampton and am just starting into the Cherbourg group. I will post the list here or just give me your e-mail address and I will send it to you and you can compare it to your list. My e-mail is [email protected]

There is, however, a problem with this list. It is missing a lot of information. Some names are listed without ages or last known residences, so I had to fill in a few gaps. Try to go through it as best you can to see what is right and what is wrong. On Ellisisland.org, try to find the Olympic's manifest and take a look at it. The pages with the missing information are 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 34, 40, and 42, and I'm assuming they are mostly first class passengers because I remembered hearing once that First Class passengers don't go directly through Ellis island, and most of the passengers listed on these pages are recorded as American Citizens. On the text version of the manifest, the page numbers are towards the lower right corner.
I also found that many names are listed twice, especially in Third class, so the number is probably smaller than listed above.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Christian

Wow, that must have been quite the task getting all those pages from the Ellis Island site! I can't really compare anything to the list I have, because it's on microfilm and I haven't got a machine to view it. I'd need to go to a library to browse through the lists. I did this when I originally got the microfilm, but I never actually managed to do a count or any thorough look into it all.

Regarding the way the lists are written, although it doesn't say, they are separated by class, 1st Class being first, then 2nd and 3rd.

Within each class grouping, the list is separated by port of embarkation; so Southampton first, then Cherbourg and then Qeenstown.

Further, within each port of embarkation, the passengers are separated by US citizens and non-US citizens as this list was obviously used for arriving in a US port. So that's why you get hardly any information on the US citizens, while the non-US citizens have to mention everything. Given that most of the 3rd Class passengers were migrants, you will not get many US citizens there.

Anyone who is mentioned on the Ellis Island lists but is crossed out was actually booked to sail but either cancelled late or failed to board. These US lists were written up before sailing day which is why these names crept in.

I guess to get a full-er picture, you'll need to look at the UK departure lists. There, more information is available on the non-British passengers (i.e. such as the US citizens) while little info is recorded with regards to the British citizens. The only problem is that these lists tend to be less reliable than the Ellis Island lists.

Daniel.
 
Aug 28, 2005
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Good News Everybody,

I finished the passenger list, and it came out to a total of roughly 1,400 names. However, when I tried to post it here, it wouldn't open. So, I have taken the liberty of opening what will be now known as "Project Olympic" I will be doing several research projects on the Olympic, among them is a collection of her passenger lists. I hope more people will join and it will grow.

groups.yahoo.com/group/ProjectOlympic
 
Aug 28, 2005
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Well, I have so far completed the passenger lists for the first three voyages the Olympic made during the summer of 1911. I just printed up the August 29-September 5 crossing, and it's a big one, so this one may take me a while. Check it out.
By the way, if anybody is interested in making copies of the passenger lists for other liners.
1. Go to www.ellisisland.org.
2. Log in or subscribe (don't worry, it's free.)
3. Go to Advanced Search.
4. Where it says "passenger last name", select the option "starts with" it must be at least three letters long. This helps when you are looking for a certain voyage date. Also, don't forget to put in the name of your ship in the bottom box. Click "search"
5. Once a list of names comes up, go through each one to find the date you are looking for. Remember, the dates listed are those of their arrival in New York.
6. Once you've found the voyage you are looking for, it is time to retrieve the manifest. Above the passenger's record there is a row of hyperlinks. Select "Original Ship Manifest"
7. A picture of the original manifest will appear. Now, select "View Text Version Manifest"
8. Now, there will be a neater list of passengers from that voyage. You must get to the beginning of the document, so begin to go back through the pages by clicking "Prev" Keep going until it won't go anymore. When there is still more pages, the "Prev" hyperlink will be underlined. When you've reached the beginning of the document, it won't be underlined anymore.
9. Now it is time to start printing. Before you start, Select the "View" Menu on your toolbar and change the text size down to smallest. This will ensure it will all fit on the page when you print. Sometimes you might need to go to Page Setup and decrease the margins. Once this is all done, you can start printing. (NOTICE: THIS DOES TAKE A WHILE, SO MAKE SURE YOU DO THIS WHEN YOU ARE SURE YOU WILL HAVE TIME!)
10. As you go from page to page, you will see the page number on the LOWER right side. Do NOT go by the upper right page number, it is incorrect. The pages are not always in numerical order in the document, so make sure to organize them as you print. The Average list is between 40 and 75 pages.
11. Once you're all done printing, make a master list of the pages using a spreadsheet or Microsoft Excel. List the page number, number of names on the page, and what port they boarded at. When you are finished, you will notice that there are roughly three clusters of each port, representing the three classes. The first clusters are the First Class passengers, you will notice that a lot of the pages only list the names, not the ages or the last residences. Ellis Island Officials didn't usually keep this kind of information. The next clusters are the Second Class passengers, and the last clusters, usually the largest clusters, are the steerage passengers.
12. Once you have your pages organized, you can start typing up your list. The manifest usually gives three pieces of information Name, Gender, Age, Nationality, Marital Status, and Last Known Residence. It is common for some of these to be missing, especially with first class.
NOTE: IF YOU CAN'T PRINT THE PASSENGER MANIFEST, YOU COULD TRY TO CUT AND PASTE IT WHILE TRYING TO KEEP THE PAGES IN ORDER.
 
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Wade Sisson

Member
Jan 10, 2008
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It's great to see that Ellis Island's site gives us such complete passenger lists. I've been able to download some Olympic passenger lists as well. I only wish there was a way to get the list of westbound Olympic passengers for her trips back home. Anyone have any breakthroughs there?
 
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Manuel Viviani

Guest
I'm searching my ancestry on passengers list of Olympic:
date 1913 from Southampton to New York, 3rd Class.
Where can I look?
 

jmunson

Member
Feb 12, 2015
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Olympic passenger lists

Hi just wondering if anyone has access to or knows where access to Olympics passenger log records could be accessed. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks JM.
 

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