Olympics's Maiden Voyage


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Daniel Odysseus

Guest
On Titanic's maiden voyage, many rich and prominent people were onboard. I believe Olympic was more famous until Titanic sank... Were any prominent people onboard Olympic during its first voyage?
 
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Daniel Odysseus

Guest
Thanks Mark. It's strange... Like I said, I heard from somewhere that Olympic was more famous than Titanic until after Titanic sank. It's strange, then, that Titanic would have so many more prominent people...

-Daniel Odysseus
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Maybe not so strange depending on the time of year. After extended holidays, a lot of people would be on their way home. This would include a lot of the well-to-do who would be returning from travel in Egypt, or Europe.

I suspect that had the Titanic not gone down, the Olympic would be a lot better remembered as the first ship in a class usually is. Outside of our circle though, how many people even know the Olympic (or the Britannic!) existed much less know their story?
 

Erik Wood

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Apr 10, 2001
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That is a sad truth Mike. But the sinking of the ship and Camerons movie spurred a burst in the industry. Go figure.
 
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Brent Holt

Guest
The Cameron film also perpetuated the legend of the Titanic as a one of a kind supership, the likes of which the world had never seen. Olympic was never mentioned and it is inferred that Titanic is one of a kind.
"He envisioned a steamer so grand in scale and appointments that her supremacy would never be challenged"-Thomas Andrews from the movie. (not an exact quote)
I seriously doubt Andrews, even in a burst of enthusiasm, would have said that since they were building Britannic at that moment.
Brent
 

Erik Wood

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Apr 10, 2001
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Most take what Cameron portrayed as the truth. When I would start to explain events as they really happened I got startled responses. Most couldn't believe what I was saying. But then again most of those where young folks. The older ones knew that I knew what I was talking about.
 
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Daniel Odysseus

Guest
Brent:
I believe Imperator was being planned, if not already being built, at the time as well...

And also, to everyone else, if Cameron made actually said that there were other ships just as big, it would've kind of detracted from the idea that Titanic was superior to everything of its day... Not that I agree; Olympic deserved a good mention at least in the movie...

-D.O.
 
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Joshua McCracken

Guest
I thought you would be interested to know that when the Hawke collided with the Olympic in 1911 a little over twenty millionaires were onboard. Not as much as the Titanic, but still interesting. I'm thinking that maybe alot of these people were returning from holidays aboard (i.e. John Jacob Astor and Molly Brown)
 
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Mikael Jonsson

Guest
Hi everyone.

Olympic's maiden voyage was a long time ago, but I wonder if someone who was on the maiden voyage is still alive?

Mikael
 
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Mikael Jonsson

Guest
Hi Mark.

happy.gif
Guess many have tried to find out this before, but it is probably too late now. Even if there are any still alive they were probably to young to remember it.

best regards, Mikael
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi Mikael!

You're so right. Considering the dwindling number of survivors from Titanic in 1912, let alone those who can remember the sinking, it seems highly unlikely that anyone still lives -- or remembers -- Olympic's maiden voyage. There were/are people from the wartime voyages who passed away recently in the 1990s. I also know someone who saw Olympic in 1935, but alas I have yet to find anyone who actually remembers in detail one of her early voyages.

Best regards,

Mark.
 
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Mikael Jonsson

Guest
I actually correspond with an older man who travelled on Olympic in 1912. He was supposed to travel back to Europe from USA with the Titanic, but when she sank the family got tickets on Olympic instead.

He was only four years old back then and doesn't remember so much today, but he remembers a little. He is very old, but he still loves to write mail.

There must be plenty of people left who travelled on Olymic in the 1930's. It would be very interesting to hear stories from one of them. I hope I will manage to contact someone one day who remember and would like to be interviewed.

best regards, Mikael
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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it seems highly unlikely that anyone still lives

I'm not at all sure about that, Mark. There were some 1300 passengers on Olympic for her maiden voyage, right? Add in the crew, and we're dealing with a pool of over 2,000 people, nearly three times as many as survived Titanic, only ten months later. I would think it's a pretty good bet that there are still some survivors, although they were, as you suggest, probably too young to have any meaningful memories of the trip.

In any event, trying to track them down now, so many years later, is probably an impossible task.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi All!

I originally wrote: it seems highly unlikely that anyone still lives -- or remembers -- Olympic's maiden voyage.

And Mark Baber replied: I'm not at all sure about that...

What I *should* have wrote is that it is unlikely anyone is still alive who clearly remembers the crossing. It should be 'still lives -- AND remembers'.

My maiden voyage passenger figure, from memory, is indeed 1,313. I think there were 891 crew, but I'm not at all sure of that.

Best regards,

Mark.
 

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