Open portholes/Pumps


JTDillon

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Hello everyone!! I had two quick questions for the experts out there. Id appreciate your help :)

1) Does anyone know which portholes they found open on the Titanic wreck? I read somewhere about finding portholes around the bow area open, but thats as specific as it got. anyone have anything more specific by chance? I dont expect exact rooms, but a general area perhaps?
I think its odd to have had multiple portholes open like that. Were there rooms hot as hell at night? I dont know if you guys know this or not but a lot of experts say it was pretty cold that night. Leaving your porthole open like that would cool a room down pretty fast! The rooms in the bow area were crew quarters, multiple men in a small area. Im surprised a group of guys all agreed it was too warm, and all agreed freezing air was good. Oh well...I digress

2) Were the pumps ever turned on in boiler rooms? I know we see water shooting out of the ship which lifeboats were lowered into but from my understanding this was water out of the condenser which has to do with the boilers being shut off. Actually, were the pumps even for flooding in the boiler room itself? I think ive read somewhere that the concept of the pumps was a misconception, that the pumps referenced in the film were actually only to pump water into and out of the ballast tanks to compensate for the lost weight of used coal during the voyage?

If the pumps were for flooding, were they ever turned on? Obviously the pumps probably werent turned turned on in BR6, but BR5 they could have been. They had plenty of time to get them running despite the alleged "wall of water" which made Barret suddenly abandon his post (I made another post about how I suspect him of lying). I havent read anything to suggest pumps were turned on during the flooding....
 
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Cam Houseman

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Hello everyone!! I had two quick questions for the experts out there. Id appreciate your help :)

1) Does anyone know which portholes they found open on the Titanic wreck? I read somewhere about finding portholes around the bow area open, but thats as specific as it got. anyone have anything more specific by chance? I dont expect exact rooms, but a general area perhaps?
I think its odd to have had multiple portholes open like that. Were there rooms hot as hell at night? I dont know if you guys know this or not but a lot of experts say it was pretty cold that night. Leaving your porthole open like that would cool a room down pretty fast! The rooms in the bow area were crew quarters, multiple men in a small area. Im surprised a group of guys all agreed it was too warm, and all agreed freezing air was good. Oh well...I digress

2) Were the pumps ever turned on in boiler rooms? I know we see water shooting out of the ship which lifeboats were lowered into but from my understanding this was water out of the condenser which has to do with the boilers being shut off. Actually, were the pumps even for flooding in the boiler room itself? I think ive read somewhere that the concept of the pumps was a misconception, that the pumps referenced in the film were actually only to pump water into and out of the ballast tanks to compensate for the lost weight of used coal during the voyage?

If the pumps were for flooding, were they ever turned on? Obviously the pumps probably werent turned turned on in BR6, but BR5 they could have been. They had plenty of time to get them running despite the alleged "wall of water" which made Barret suddenly abandon his post (I made another post about how I suspect him of lying). I havent read anything to suggest pumps were turned on during the flooding....
Hello There!

1. Ken Marschall counted 132 open portholes, not in mashed/mangled/bent areas of the bow

2. They brought the pumps from the Electric Engines area, I think

take care!
 
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Keith H

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They brought forward portable pumps to the boiler rooms but i don't know where they pumped the water out to
And i know they also used the ash ejectors as a makeshift way to remove water from the boiler rooms
 
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JTDillon

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Hello There!

1. Ken Marschall counted 132 open portholes, not in mashed/mangled/bent areas of the bow

2. They brought the pumps from the Electric Engines area, I think

take care!


Wow...132 open portholes. Honestly its stuff like that which makes me suspicious of foul play haha. I mean seriously, 132 rooms (rooms with multiple people) all had no problem with arctic air coming in their window all night?
Anyway, I appreciate the info. I will just assume the portholes were evenly spaced along the bow area
 
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JTDillon

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They brought forward portable pumps to the boiler rooms but i don't know where they pumped the water out to
And i know they also used the ash ejectors as a makeshift way to remove water from the boiler rooms

Yeah thats a great question about the portable pumps, where would the exit be? I guess they mightve worked by pumping water out through the mechanism that controls the levels in the ballast tanks maybe. That's probably why they were lifting manholes in BR5 (a man fell into one and broke his leg). Did they deploy these pumps in all the boiler rooms before leaving them to head to the boat decks? So many questions. Thank you for the info. I guess the best place for me to go is the transcripts from the inquiries & testimonies of the survivors.

BTW, the ash ejectors ejected ash up by the boat deck right? I thought they were just big fans to blow coal dust and ash up a vent out the top of the ship. Thatd mean water would be coming out of the top onto the decks
 
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Cam Houseman

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Wow...132 open portholes. Honestly its stuff like that which makes me suspicious of foul play haha. I mean seriously, 132 rooms (rooms with multiple people) all had no problem with arctic air coming in their window all night?
Anyway, I appreciate the info. I will just assume the portholes were evenly spaced along the bow area
Hi! no problem, happy to help!
A lot of cabins were too warm, according to them, so they opened it. I guess in the hubhub during the evacuation, a LOT of people forgot
 
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JTDillon

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Hi! no problem, happy to help!
A lot of cabins were too warm, according to them, so they opened it. I guess in the hubhub during the evacuation, a LOT of people forgot

Ah okay. See, I havent read anywhere that said rooms were too warm. I have a lot more research to do. I am gonna go to the inquiry transcripts and read survivor testimonies to get a more detailed account of what happened.
 

Keith H

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Yeah thats a great question about the portable pumps, where would the exit be? I guess they mightve worked by pumping water out through the mechanism that controls the levels in the ballast tanks maybe. That's probably why they were lifting manholes in BR5 (a man fell into one and broke his leg). Did they deploy these pumps in all the boiler rooms before leaving them to head to the boat decks? So many questions. Thank you for the info. I guess the best place for me to go is the transcripts from the inquiries & testimonies of the survivors.

BTW, the ash ejectors ejected ash up by the boat deck right? I thought they were just big fans to blow coal dust and ash up a vent out the top of the ship. Thatd mean water would be coming out of the top onto the decks
The ash {some 100 tons a day} was shovelled into sump and mixed with sea water then sucked up through pumps and pumped out about E deck into the sea . So that explains that part now I wonder where the out let for the portable pumps went to .
 
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The ash {some 100 tons a day} was shovelled into sump and mixed with sea water then sucked up through pumps and pumped out about E deck into the sea . So that explains that part now I wonder where the out let for the portable pumps went to .
I haven't read that they used portable pumps. If I'm wrong on that would happily be corrected. From what I've read in the past they were running hoses to/from existing permanent pumps or flooded spaces with the plan to pump to existing sumps and or condenser hotwell and then use those sumps pumps to pump overboard. If Titanic did have portable pumps they would have been pretty useless with what Titanic was facing. The discharge rate of a portable pump that crew could move around would have been too small. Portable pumps are great for pumping out a space when you have time (which they didn't have) or if they are able to keep up with the inflow. But in Titanic's situation it would have been an exercise in futility. Anyway just my 2 cents worth. Good info on her pumps in the links below but some of the links inside them are gone now. Cheers.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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Ken Marschall counted 132 open portholes, not in mashed/mangled/bent areas of the bow
But that could be due to the fact that when the completely flooded bow section struck the bottom of the ocean, the water within the ship was subject to a momentary outward pressure, augmented by the column of displaced water striking the top. The net effect could have simply blown open all those portholes.
 
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Cam Houseman

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But that could be due to the fact that when the completely flooded bow section struck the bottom of the ocean, the water within the ship was subject to a momentary outward pressure, augmented by the column of displaced water striking the top. The net effect could have simply blown open all those portholes.
if that was the case, things like the Dining Saloon Stainglass windows would've been broken. would've been. It didn't happen, other than small things like the Officer's Quarters windows.
 

Arun Vajpey

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I can understand and accept that a few portholes were left open but 132? I don't think so. There must be some other explanation. It was a cold night and they had some problems with heating in many rooms. I don't think most passengers would have left porthole windows open that night.
 
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Rose F.

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I can understand and accept that a few portholes were left open but 132? I don't think so. There must be some other explanation. It was a cold night and they had some problems with heating in many rooms. I don't think most passengers would have left porthole windows open that night.
My understanding is it has less to do with heat, and more to do with ventilation. Passengers opened portholes mainly to get some fresh air, even if that air was slightly chilled.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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My understanding is it has less to do with heat, and more to do with ventilation. Passengers opened portholes mainly to get some fresh air, even if that air was slightly chilled.
Ok, that makes sense. Especially in multi-occupancy rooms with limited washing facilities, fresh air must have been welcome, even if it was cold.
 

Keith H

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I haven't read that they used portable pumps. If I'm wrong on that would happily be corrected. From what I've read in the past they were running hoses to/from existing permanent pumps or flooded spaces with the plan to pump to existing sumps and or condenser hotwell and then use those sumps pumps to pump overboard. If Titanic did have portable pumps they would have been pretty useless with what Titanic was facing. The discharge rate of a portable pump that crew could move around would have been too small. Portable pumps are great for pumping out a space when you have time (which they didn't have) or if they are able to keep up with the inflow. But in Titanic's situation it would have been an exercise in futility. Anyway just my 2 cents worth. Good info on her pumps in the links below but some of the links inside them are gone now. Cheers.
It may be that the outlet pipes from the portable pumps were pointed into the hoppers of ash ejectors to suck the water out the ship .
ash.png
ash1.png
 
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Ok, that makes sense. Especially in multi-occupancy rooms with limited washing facilities, fresh air must have been welcome, even if it was cold.
That would be my first response to why if multi berth cabins, remember back in those days, especially for the working class body odor was culturally acceptable
Pack 6 or 8 sweaty men into a small space and porthole would steam up as well as their annoyance

The bow sank first, so logic would determine that over the course of that couple of hours air would have time to escape with the incoming seawater, therefore my thoughts would be 132 portholes didn't blow open

A new conspiracy theory... foul play?
Makes some sense due to fact White Star Line were in serious financial troubles, to make sure Titanic did sink ensured them of the massive insurance payout

A theory not so wild as that Titanic was switched with the damaged Olympic

Am sure there are some experts on these above ideas
 

Keith H

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I can understand and accept that a few portholes were left open but 132? I don't think so. There must be some other explanation. It was a cold night and they had some problems with heating in many rooms. I don't think most passengers would have left porthole windows open that night.
I could imagine that being a new ship and with the heating on, and with new paint and carpet it could have been a bit stuffy down below and people could have trouble sleeping so may have undone the portholes just a crack to let a bit of cool fresh air in.
 
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