Open portholes/Pumps


Nov 14, 2005
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It may be that the outlet pipes from the portable pumps were pointed into the hoppers of ash ejectors to suck the water out the ship .View attachment 75734View attachment 75735
Nice pics. I like the first one. Hadn't seen it before. Thanks. But what portable pumps were used? I still don't think they were trying to use portable pumps if they even had them. From what I know and I admit I could be wrong on this but I think they were stringing hoses to use to connect to existing pumps intake or discharge lines to reroute the water where they couldn't use the existing piping to reroute thru different valve arraignments. Like I said before. portable pumps are great if you have lots of time. They require a power source to work, either electric, air, engine driven or another prime mover. They might have had eductor pumps but anybody that's used them knows they are probably the least efficient pumps out there and you need another pump running to use them. I'm not trying to ping on your idea but I haven't seen or read where they used portable pumps. Over my career I've used hundreds of portable pumps of every kind I can think of. They work great in most applications but in Titanic's situation I don't think they could have made a difference. Interesting topic though. Thanks and cheers.
 

Bo Bowman

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I agree, 132 open portholes is a lot of incoming water. One wonders if the impact of hitting the ocean floor, which did great damage to the hull, popped these open. However I will admit that the prospect of a BRAND NEW CONSPIRACY THEORY is delicious. The old ones were getting a bit worn out.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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I agree, 132 open portholes is a lot of incoming water. One wonders if the impact of hitting the ocean floor, which did great damage to the hull, popped these open. However I will admit that the prospect of a BRAND NEW CONSPIRACY THEORY is delicious. The old ones were getting a bit worn out.
According to the Titanic historian Tim Maltin from an article I just read he stated that the reason for so many portholes being open was that when the ship stopped a lot of passengers opened the portholes to try and see what was going on and didn't re-close them when they went up on deck. Also stated that 12 open portholes were equal to the damage opened to the sea. You can read it if interested and decide for yourself on the accuracy of it.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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In any case, how watertight were portholes of those days when closed? If the passengers were able to open them with relative ease, they probably were not very secure under pressure from outside. Did they have rubber gaskets or similar seals?

At least some of the forward CLOSED portholes must have started to go under before the cabin or other space within was flooded. That would mean water pressure from outside became a factor.
 

Cam Houseman

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You'll probably find it on page 132. ;)
Actually lol, it was on page 64-65 of "Farewell Titanic"
Oh, so I was wrong, actually, apologies!

"in 2001, historian and artist Ken Marschall began a count of porthole openings that would eventually combine the photographic results of more than twenty years of expeditions, all the way through 2010. Along the portside, Marschall counted 132 portholes that were located in regions of the hull not ruptured, bent, or otherwise deformed by the final crash on the abyssal plain. Only in uncrumpled areas could people's intent be guessed at; of the 132 portholes, including a porthole under the front of the well deck, 18 percent appeared to be open. On the starboard side, 17 percent of the 114 C-and D-Deck portholes appeared to be open. "
"Marschall concluded that once the bow section broke away and begun plunging toward the bottom, any open E-Deck and F-Deck portholes would probably have swung shut and possibly "only appeared 'closed' today from the outside. So we'll never know how many of the E and F deck ports were undogged [not locked with a pin]-unless someone wants to take the time and expense of manually pushing on each and every port [with a submersible's arm] to see if it pushes inward, open." "

phew, that took me a while. Thoughts?
 
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Dec 27, 2017
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On the subject of pumps they ran HOSES through from the Engine room where the main bilge and ballast pumps were located. Once connected these pumps would have provided the motive force to move the water. However (a) their combined suction was only a small percentage of the incoming water quantity and (b) the hoses would have been cut when the automatic trips closed the water-tight doors. Bear in mind that the total pumping capacity was only about 15% of the incoming waterflow using very pump option they had.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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Actually lol, it was on page 64-65 of "Farewell Titanic"
Oh, so I was wrong, actually, apologies!

"in 2001, historian and artist Ken Marschall began a count of porthole openings that would eventually combine the photographic results of more than twenty years of expeditions, all the way through 2010. Along the portside, Marschall counted 132 portholes that were located in regions of the hull not ruptured, bent, or otherwise deformed by the final crash on the abyssal plain. Only in uncrumpled areas could people's intent be guessed at; of the 132 portholes, including a porthole under the front of the well deck, 18 percent appeared to be open. On the starboard side, 17 percent of the 114 C-and D-Deck portholes appeared to be open. "
"Marschall concluded that once the bow section broke away and begun plunging toward the bottom, any open E-Deck and F-Deck portholes would probably have swung shut and possibly "only appeared 'closed' today from the outside. So we'll never know how many of the E and F deck ports were undogged [not locked with a pin]-unless someone wants to take the time and expense of manually pushing on each and every port [with a submersible's arm] to see if it pushes inward, open." "

phew, that took me a while. Thoughts?
So with the math that would work out to 46 open portholes. Or 4 times the area open to the sea caused by the collision. 46 is still a lot. Thanks for the info.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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On the subject of pumps they ran HOSES through from the Engine room where the main bilge and ballast pumps were located. Once connected these pumps would have provided the motive force to move the water. However (a) their combined suction was only a small percentage of the incoming water quantity and (b) the hoses would have been cut when the automatic trips closed the water-tight doors. Bear in mind that the total pumping capacity was only about 15% of the incoming waterflow using very pump option they had.
I'm wondering how that would work out for them. And what kind of hoses they were using. Seems regular fire type hoses would collapse if connected to the suction side of the pumps. Either way like you said and I said before they were up against it. Too much water coming in.
 

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