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Dec 7, 2000
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I really like the Smoke room. I'm sure to see it in its real colors, all that paneling and carving would have looked really spectacular! I'd also say the Straus sitting room C55 in Regency style was very nice (same style as the sitting room — B52 — in the movie).

Daniel.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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The Turkish bath cooling room for me, perhaps not classed as a proper public room but nevertheless mysterious and fascinating:


Quote:

‘The Cooling room on the middle deck in connection with the Turkish Baths is in many respects one of the most interesting and striking rooms on the ship. The portholes are concealed by an elaborately carved Cairo curtain, through which the light fitfully reveals “something of the grandeur of the mysterious East.”
‘The walls are completely tiled, from the dado to the cornice, in large panels of blue and green, surrounded by a broad band of tiles in a bolder and deeper hue.
‘The dado and doors and panelling are in a warm-coloured Teak, which makes a perfect setting to the gorgeous effect of the tiles and ceiling, the cornice and beams of which are gilt, and the intervening panels picked-out in dull red. From these panels are suspended bronze Arab lamps. The stanchions are cased also in teak, carved all over with an intricate Moorish pattern, and surmounted by a carved cap.
‘Over the doors are small gilt domes, semicircular in plan, with their soffits carved in a low relief geometrical pattern.
‘As those who partake of Turkish Baths are constrained to spend a considerable time in the Cooling Room, no pains have been spared to make it interesting and comfortable.
‘Around the walls are low couches, and between each an inlaid Damascus table, upon which one may place one’s coffee, cigarettes, or books.
‘As the drinking of fresh water is one of the concomitant features of the benefits of taking the bath, there is a handsome marble drinking fountain set in a frame of tiles. There is also a teak dressing table and mirror with all its accessories, and a locker to which valuables may be committed, whilst scattered around the room are numerous canvas chairs.’



 
Jan 31, 2001
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Hello,

I am quite fond of both the lounge and the smoking room. These on-board places appeal to me the most. The lounge appears to have been a comfortable, living room-style place. The smoking room appears to have just been a wonderful place to play cards and have nightcap. Both the rooms were very elegant, and I can't say that I could choose between which is more appealing in my opinion. I would probably choose the smoking room.

-B.W.
 
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Rolf Vonk

Guest
Hi,

I know it's not a public room, but I really prefer suiteroom B64. That room is not too sober and not too exuberant. I love the light colors of the Empire panneling combined with the graceful golden paintings and the elegant fittings in the room.... especially the four poster bed is absolute my number one!

The only thing I miss is a palmtree like those beautiful onces in the reception room...

Rolf
 

Ben Holme

Member
Feb 11, 2001
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I agree with Daniel. The Smoking room gets my vote, especially with the fire lit!

The a la carte restaurant would also have been gorgeous with its walnut paneling etc. 3rd place goes to the Verandah cafe with the ivy-covered walls and wicker furniture

As far as cabins are concerned, I would have evicted the Baxters from their suite (B-58/60) in 1912:)
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Dec 20, 2000
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I love the Grand Staircase.

As the centrepiece of the ship in the A Deck foyer, with its ornate woodwork and promise of things to come on decks below it was nothing short of sensational.

When the Titanic was discovered I was so looking forward to that trip down the stairs, and it was such a disapointment when it was discovered they had gone.

The wreck would be so much more "alive" if the Grand Staircase was still there.

Regards

Sam
 
Mar 20, 2000
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All,

I think the Cafe Parisienne, the Palm Court (or is that the right name for it?), and the a la carte restaurant were the most elegant rooms on the ship - the first two because of their light, airy, garden feel and the third because of the rose color scheme and Louis decor.

I don't care for the dark wood of the smoking room or the cavernous style of the dining room. I think always an intimate low-lighted area is more appealing whether on land or sea.

Randy
 
Dec 7, 2000
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It's obvious that the Dining room did not gain a place in any of the votes. Perhaps the black and white photos or the colorized pictures of the room aren't too kind to the beauty of it (if it was that spectacular), but I would agree with Edith Russell (although not referring to the room in particular) she had the vast cold feeling for the ship, rather than the warmth and intimacy of a life on board.

Compared to dining rooms of other ships of the day, the Olympic's and Titanic's appears rather modest.

I'd give second place to the lounge.

My favorite cabin is B60.

Ben: If you have trouble evicting the Baxters, try your luck on the Penascos as their cabin C65 was in the same style as B60. And as C63 was probably unoccupied, take that up as well as it was decorated in the same style as B58.

Daniel.
 

Nigel Bryant

Member
Jan 14, 2001
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Wellington, New Zealand
To Daniel
Though the Dining Saloon does not look spectacular in the black and white photos it does look spectacular in color. Postcards don't seem to show the beauty of it.

You can see the room in color in Cameron's set. A picture explains a thousands words so here is a link.....

http://www.titanicgal.prv.pl/

Hope this is useful,

Regards Nigel
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Sam,

What is the source of your quote about the Turkish Baths. It is fascinating.

I'll get back to you on that. It's in my 'rsearch notebook' and either from the Shipbuilder, White Star publicity, the Belfast News Letter or the Daily Mail or Daily Mirror.

As we all like different places, why not say every room was equal?

Best regards.

Mark.
 
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Martin Dall

Guest
I like the D-Deck reception- it must have been really good walking down the stairs from Boat Deck to C-Deck, and then walking down the next flight, and seeing a huge, light and airy room open up, with the stained glass, carpets, and huge paintings on the walls.
I also like the First Class Lounge- it's really clever, how the tops of the windows, are actually on Boat-Deck, although they look like a whole. I also like the fireplace, and the huge bookcase opposite it.
 

Ben Holme

Member
Feb 11, 2001
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Hi Daniel,

My favorite cabin is also B-60
happy.gif


Would you happen to know how B-88/90 was decorated? They seem to be the most alluring of the "definitely unoccupied" suites, and the neighbors would have been interesting.

Re Dining Saloon.

I think Cameron does the room the most justice. Very little is discernible in the Fr. Browne photo and everything looks untidy. The only other photos are of the Olympic and the linoleum tiles give the room a cold austerity.

Question: Was Cameron's DS carpet historically accurate? I read somewhere that linoleum flooring was used, albeit in a more interesting design than that of her sister ship.

Any thoughts?

Ben
 
Jan 5, 2001
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There's a thread far down that explains about the carpet-tile conondrum. It's called.

<FONT COLOR="ff0000">1st class dining room - some questions
 

Thomas Ford

Member
Nov 30, 2000
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i would have to pick the cafe parisian as one of the best, with the trellised walls and wicker furniture it must have been comfortable just to sit and relax.
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Hi Guys,

I'm a little late on this thread. There are too many to keep up with, but I really wanted to share my thoughts with you.

My vote gets the First-Class Lounge for its beauty and for what it denotes: Socializing.

I am an outgoing person who loves to socialize, (especially on this Board) so naturally that room would get my vote!

Teri
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
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I have always wondered why the Dining Salon wasn't more impressive. There were ample 1st Class rooms, why not remove some on C Deck to allow for a higher ceiling?
Maybe the reasion is similar to Imperator's. Her B Deck public rooms were teutonic masterpieces, but her Dining Room was (IMHO) almost freighterish. This was done on purpose to attract more passengers to the lavish Ritz-Carlton (were they paid for their food). Maybe this stratagy was also used on Titanic.
David
 
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