Oreos


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Ben Lemmon

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Feb 6, 2008
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Alas try using it sparingly with a 2 year old.
This is coming from years of observation (and a couple semesters of psychology), so it's not really an expert opinion. However, in this case, I would try using some other gesture (no, not the finger) to get your message across. Perhaps like simply shaking your head if you're a ways away from them. If you're closer, whisper vehemently in her ear. When she's really in trouble, use "the look" and perhaps you won't get the responses above. Of course, these are just observations, and if you find them trite and silly, pay them no heed.
 
May 27, 2007
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No, not trite Ben. I've used the methods you mention and they do work better then the look. Thence the earlier posts were I say the look doesn't always work.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>Also, Jim, what would you think about eating in the car on a road trip?

Well...uhh...no. One stops the car, gets out, eats like a civilized human being, gets back in and continues driving. Because- seriously- feeding kids as a means of alleviating boredom is a quick fix that will foster REALLY bad habits quite quickly. I'm impervious to whining (working retail will do that to one) and the three meals a day and no snacking rule is completely inflexible.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I'm impervious to whining (working retail will do that to one)<<

Oh boy, you got that right! Especially when dealing with people who just don't understand why you don't want to "help" them poison, electrocute, blow themselves up, or in some other fashion, render themselves corpus kaput in a wide range of really dumb ways. I deal with that every day in the home improvement industry. (And I have to do it with a smile!)

Something about avoiding a wrongful death lawsuit.

Speaking only for myself, I tend to eat on the road all the time, especially when Mum and I head to Charleston to take in the history. Sometimes, getting there in a timely fashion makes it necessery. Still, at some point, we stop and sit down someplace where we can eat in peace without having to worry about what some idiot is going to do with that SUV they have no business driving.
 
May 27, 2007
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Jim,

Because- seriously- feeding kids as a means of alleviating boredom is a quick fix that will foster REALLY bad habits quite quickly.

I noticed that first time parents get into feeding kids when the kids are little, like say one or two years old. Most young children eat sparingly or are picky eaters. Well most of the children I know. When my daughter eats a banana I usually eat half or save it for half and hour and see if she wants it then if not then I eat it. Same drill with yogurt. Although she'll eat a whole granola bar and she's pretty good about eating her meals in one go although sometimes she has to be prodded. I know some kids who go ape when their parents force them to eat a whole meal.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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No, no, George. Small children aren't picky eaters, they just have small stomachs. Small children eat nearly anything - in reasonably small quantities. It's only when they go to school they discover what's not to be eaten i.e. vegetables, liver, etc. Or what is to be eaten i.e. McDonalds, Sunny Delight etc.

I don't know what one can do about this, short of declaring WW3, initiating rationing, and telling the children they'll starve if they don't eat up every scrap. I was born after WW2 but I remember my parents telling me, when I left food, that Lord Woolton would be round with his 'smacking machine' to discipline recalcitrant children who didn't eat up. I didn't believe it for a minute, and just laughed. But I did grow up eating more than modern children do, so I suppose it might have worked in a way.

For those of you who may be wondering in a modern parenting way, my parents only smiled when I shouted "I don't believe it, where is he?" and never laid a finger on me. They just tried very hard to convince me of the necessity of eating up. Sad to say, there was a ledge under the dining table, under which I remembering stashing crusts, fat, and anything else I didn't like. It all dropped to the floor when my mother cleared the table. But I don't remember anything else except my (ex-Japanese POW father) saying,
"Well, I have to say, I've never liked fat either."

However, they did bring me up to eat almost everything that anyone puts in front of me. The corollary is, of course, that nobody of my generation ever puts in front of you anything you wouldn't eat. Because they know.
 
May 27, 2007
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they just have small stomachs.

Monica,

True! I forget to mention that important fact. My daughter eats everything off her plate but I never give her gigantic helpings either. She also isn't around other kids enough to pick up their habits. Usually breakfast then a snack then lunch then a snack and dinner then a snack. I've noticed that nap time can have an effect on when she wants her afternoon snack.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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In our time, Mon, the trick was to feed kids stuff that was so awful that for the rest of their lives just about anything else put before them would be appreciated. Remember dripping? Sago? Dried eggs? Snark? Rock salmon (dogfish) etc etc. And castor oil, of course.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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I take strong exception, Bob, to the implication that you and I ever ate dried eggs or snark. That was long gone by the time we came around. But sago (at school), rock salmon (not so very bad really) and I vaguely remember other poor young souls getting castor oil, for some reason or another.

Now dripping, so very bad for you of course (cholesterol), was rather delicious on toast, if you got the beef jelly underlying it.
 

Bob Godfrey

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You have a short memory, Mon. Do you not recall me eating two dried eggs only last week? But I'll concede the snark, especially since it was actually snoek (the snark having been hunted to extinction by Lewis Carroll). And you know full well what castor oil was for - it was administered if you'd eaten too much snoek (and had run out of senna pods).

I rather liked dripping too, but we'll never convince this lot it was a delicacy. We know better, of course, having been raised on condensed milk sandwiches, chip butties and Mars bars deep fried in batter. I haven't tried cholesterol though. Can you get it in Marks & Spencers?
 
May 27, 2007
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Yet, George, yet. Good luck.

Thanks Monica I'll know already I'm gonna need all the luck I can get. This is why parents invented playgroups. Perhaps?

Remember dripping? Sago? Dried eggs? Snark? Rock salmon (dogfish) etc etc. And castor oil, of course.
Ye Gads!
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You all ate castor oil, as children? Did they make you stand in the corner facing the corner with your hands on your head on your tip toes til you dropped as well?
 
Feb 4, 2007
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I should think Debenhams might sell small jars of cholesterol, and if they do not, then Harrods surely must. This is an item that is usually shelved alongside (or inside of) such delicacies as "Spotted Dick", "Singing Hinnies", "Wet Nelly", and other deliciously artery clogging foods.
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Jun 11, 2000
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Yes, I remember being stood in the corner, though not on tiptoes. Never had castor oil, though, or Singing Hinnies or Wet Nellies. Haven't a clue what they were, and deep fried Mars bars are a comparatively recent invention. I mostly had meat and 2 veg, and you had to eat up all the veg, though I was let off the fat on the meat, courtesy of my father. Who, when he came home from Changi, promptly stopped eating dreadful stuff and resumed his previous likes and dislikes, and got fairly picky with the poor local butcher.
 
May 27, 2007
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Hello Monica,

Never had Castor Oil

Because you were probably a good little girl who didn't use profanity. Here in the States, Castor Oil was used on certain children who cussed and swore. My father was one.
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The shame.

or Singing Hinnies or Wet Nellies.

I never had 'em either! Don't want to.

Yes, I remember being stood in the corner, though not on tiptoes.

I too have stood in the corner a time or two but never had to do the punishment stance (hands above head on tip toes). Although I'm sure some little Victorians and Edwardians did. Not saying your generation is that old, Monica. I was just having some fun or being ornery.
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I'll remember to place myself in the corner before bed tonight. I really didn't have any sweets growing up, either. My Mom who I think is around your generation, Monica only got sweets at Christmas and Easter plus on her Birthday. She also might of got candy now and again. But not like today's generation. My Nephew has had five cavities in the course of his 9 years.
shock.gif
My brother and I didn't have our first cavities til High school.
 
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Kyle Johnstone

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>>Usually breakfast then a snack then lunch then a snack and dinner then a snack. I've noticed that nap time >>can have an effect on when she wants her afternoon snack.

Sounds like my average day on a ship...
happy.gif

Does she play shuffleboard?
 
May 27, 2007
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Does she play shuffleboard?

Not yet Kyle but her routine is repetitious. Luckily she's 2 so she doesn't know all the fun she's missing. Well' she manges to have a good time. But no there no desire as of yet to play shuffleboard.

Thanks for the links, Jason.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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I'm impressed, George, that you can still persuade a 2-year old to take a nap. Mine (only 14 months apart) just climbed out of the cot. Reminds me of an experiment my medic bro-in-law once described where an Olympic athlete was made to do everything a 3-year old did all day. He had to watch the toddler and do it himself - running around, jumping up and down, eating, playing etc. By 6.00 the athlete was begging for his bed and the toddler was still charging around, full of pep - without a nap, of course.

Felt quite ill, Jason, reading about the Hinnies and Nellies, as I don't have much of a sweet tooth.

Castor oil for swearing children? I must threaten my eldest with that - he's a chef and, like all of them, his language is spectacularly awful. He'd never get out of the bathroom ...
 
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