Other Ships In The Area

A

Aaron_2016

Guest
I agree with Aaron; the sailing ship is simply bobbing in the sea, not sinking.

Aaron, what paper is that clipping from? I don't know why Hapag's Deutschland would still be referred to by that name in late 1912. The Ellis Island ship manifests don't include any for "Deutschland" after 1910 but do include a number for "Victoria Luise" in 1912, although not for the dates you mentioned.
The 1912 departure and arrival listings were published in 'The Sun' New York newspaper. I checked the British newspaper archive and searched for "SS Deutschland" and she was mentioned in May 1913 in quite a number of British papers. Without subscribing I can only see a few sentences from each paper e.g.

Thursday 15th May 1913......'The German steamer Deutschland, Hamburg for New York.....ATLANTIC LINER IN TROUBLE. Lloyd’s New York agent telegraphs that the German steamer Deutschland, Hamburg for New York had her engines stopped through damage.......MISHAP TO THE DEUTSCHLAND, Lloyd’s New York agent telegraphs German steamer Deutschland, Hamburg for New York.....stopped through engine damage.'

Published in the:
Londonerry Sentinel
Dublin Daily Express
Nottingham Evening Post
Northern Ireland Northern Whig
Manchester Courier
Lancashire General Advertiser


.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,092
169
223
I'm not sure I know what this ship is. There's an article in The New York Times: Monday January 8, 1917 discussing the recent arrival of a ship named Deutschland, owned by the Eastern Forwarding Company, at New London, Connecticut.

This hardly sounds like something the Hapag four-stacker would have done. I'll see if I can come up with anything more tonight or tomorrow.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
I searched the UK newspapers archive on Findmypast. The description in the samples below is slightly garbled but it mentions the SS Deutschland coming to the rescue of another vessel in 1914.



hamburg.PNG




However the Deutschland also appears in this 1911 paper which says her name has changed to Victoria Luise.


d1911.PNG



.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
6,092
169
223
It's certain that the name of Hapag's Deutschland had been changed to Victoria Luise by 1912. That's why the 1912 references to Deutschland don't make any sense to me if they're read as referring to that ship.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Cheers. Wonder why she was called a "liner" instead of an oil tanker in these papers?



linerg1.PNG


.
 

Driver 8

Member
Oct 22, 2017
4
5
13
Other ships besides those carrying passengers were often referred to as 'liners'; usually if they sailed on a regular route.

On the other hand, if those press articles do mean to refer to a passenger liner then I guess it's simply down to misinformation. Wouldn't be the first time the press have got something wrong!
 

Andrew Twynam

Member
Apr 13, 2018
8
1
3
a man in my family tree departed Southampton on 11th April on the Ausonia, arriving Portland, Maine on 22nd April, so I guess on the morning of the 15th he must have been somewhere mid-Atlantic. I've never seen the Ausonia mentioned in relation to the Titanic.
 

Harland Duzen

Member
Jan 14, 2017
1,507
555
123
a man in my family tree departed Southampton on 11th April on the Ausonia, arriving Portland, Maine on 22nd April, so I guess on the morning of the 15th he must have been somewhere mid-Atlantic. I've never seen the Ausonia mentioned in relation to the Titanic.
It is quoted that the SS Ausonia passed the Titanic as she arrived and as Titanic departed Southampton.

Her Chief Officer said the following in an American Newspaper on the 22nd April:

"We entered Southampton harbor as the Titanic on her maiden and last voyage. We left Southampton for Portland one day after the Titanic started on her voyage to New York, and while we were over 1,400 miles east of the giant liner when she went down after striking an iceberg, we learned of the disaster within 24 hours and later changed our course and came 60 miles south of the place where the Titanic stuck the iceberg."

Portland Evening Express & Daily Advertiser 23rd April 1912 - Taken from the book: "Voices From The Carpathia: Rescuing RMS Titanic" by George Behe.

Sorry for the late reply, just found this thread again while doing research!

Back to Topic!
 

Mila

Member
Feb 19, 2019
156
16
18
I wonder, if it is known on what date and from where the Deutschland left for her 1912 voyage and on what date she got out of coal.
Thanks.
It appears that their recorded seeing a wreck on April 10.

They wrote in their log (Google translate from German) :
"high vertically out of the water
protrude the mast, apparently at one
wreck underwater. Mirage"

Here's German's version:

" hohen senkrecht aus dem Wasser
ragen den Mast, der anscheinend an einem
unter Wasser befindlichen Wrack fest war.
Luftspiegelung."


Any idea what they meant?
 
Last edited:
Nov 14, 2005
641
241
113
A translator that I use sometimes translated that as "High protrude vertically from the water the mast, apparently in a wreck under water was solid. Air mirroring". Because of quirks in German that would mean: "The mast protrude vertically high from the water. Apparently the wreck underwater was solid. Air mirroring". My german is pretty limited. I lived there for 3 years as a kinder. I can speak what I call pigeon german...good enough to be polite and the most important phrase of all "Einen grossen Kaffee bitte. Mit Sahne und Zucker. Danke.
If I'm way off please correct me. Danke.
 

Mila

Member
Feb 19, 2019
156
16
18
A translator that I use sometimes translated that as "High protrude vertically from the water the mast, apparently in a wreck under water was solid. Air mirroring". Because of quirks in German that would mean: "The mast protrude vertically high from the water. Apparently the wreck underwater was solid. Air mirroring". My german is pretty limited. I lived there for 3 years as a kinder. I can speak what I call pigeon german...good enough to be polite and the most important phrase of all "Einen grossen Kaffee bitte. Mit Sahne und Zucker. Danke.
If I'm way off please correct me. Danke.
Hi Steven, “Luftspiegelung” is “mirage” in English. It is for sure.
I am more interested if the man who wrote it really meant “mirage” as a refraction phenomenon or he meant the wreck they saw, whatever it was, looked as a mirage. What do you think?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steven Christian
Nov 14, 2005
641
241
113
Hi Steven, “Luftspiegelung” is “mirage” in English. It is for sure.
I am more interested if the man who wrote it really meant “mirage” as a refraction phenomenon or he meant the wreck they saw, whatever it was, looked as a mirage. What do you think?
I too think he was describing a mirage. Again different translators will give you different results but the meaning is usually pretty close. German often combines words into one word where in english it might be 2, 3 or 4 words. Also like english you can say the say the same words in a different way that have a different meaning. The translator I often use if you break down the word Luftspiegelung you can come up with english words 1. mirage, 2, refraction, 3. air, 4. mirroring. But they can all be interpeted as "mirage". Yes I believe he was describing a mirage. You are more educated on different types of phenomenon of optics where most of the rest of us just use the word mirage. I think whatever he was seeing he called it that.
P.S...off topic observation: I noticed on a few of my more recent trips when I travelled thru germany that the part that was former east germany I would run into more areas where very few spoke english unlike former west germany with its millions of american troops over the last 70 years or so. Some germans in the western part probably speak better english than me. Just a tidbit from the cold war divide.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mila

Harland Duzen

Member
Jan 14, 2017
1,507
555
123
I wonder, if it is known on what date and from where the Deutschland left for her 1912 voyage and on what date she got out of coal.
Thanks.
There's one or two accounts that state she ran out of coal around April 13th. Hope this is useful.

Deutschland found short of coal Western Daily Mercury April 19th 1912 Page 5.png

Above: Taken from Western Daily Mercury, April 19th 1912, Page 5

Deutschland short of coal + intended desintation New York Tribune April 18th 1912 Page 5.png

Above: Taken from New York Tribune, April 18th 1912, Page 5
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mila

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
4,930
191
193
I haven't been able to find a sailing date for Deutschland, but her performance must have been pretty ordinary. She probably did a little more than 200 miles per day. She may have left Stettin late in March.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mila