Other Ships in the vicinity posting extra lookouts?


Stacy

Member
Aug 10, 2016
2
0
11
30
I'm wondering if there's been any testimony/research done that reflects the other ships within the ice field (besides the Californian & Carpathia) that were moving in or towards the ice field that took extra precaution in posting extra lookouts and/or had the Captain on the bridge?

It has always been so odd to me that Smith/Titanic didn't do this...just wondering how many and what ships DID do these things.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
5,139
649
213
Funchal. Madeira
I'm wondering if there's been any testimony/research done that reflects the other ships within the ice field (besides the Californian & Carpathia) that were moving in or towards the ice field that took extra precaution in posting extra lookouts and/or had the Captain on the bridge?

It has always been so odd to me that Smith/Titanic didn't do this...just wondering how many and what ships DID do these things.
The Mount Temple diverted to pass to the south of it, but like many ships, she circumnavigated the ice by daylight.
It should be remembered that Titanic had no less than three "Masters" and 2 Lookouts at any one time on her bridge. In such a ship, the physical presence of the Captain would only be found necessary if they had had reports of ice directly in their path. They did not.
The two ships you mention were heading toward last reported ice positions which were directly in their respective paths.
 

Stacy

Member
Aug 10, 2016
2
0
11
30
I understand during the day -- of course, I would assume during the day that ice would be seen probably better than at night.

But what about at night? Is Titanic really the only ship that was going to attempt to move through the ice? I'm just wondering if there are others doing the same and if there were, does anyone know if they took precaution to post extra lookouts?
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
5,139
649
213
Funchal. Madeira
Huh? Please explain.
Note once again, my use of inverted commas.

The three Watches on Titanic were in Charge of Wilde, Murdoch and Lightoller. Al three were Extra Masters and fully qualified as Master Mariner (FG) Steam which means they were Certificated by the BoT to take command of any ship of any size in the British Merchant Service.
Additionally, the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th officers were also fully Certificated as Master Mariner (FG) and each of them was likewise, Certificated to take command of any British Merchant ship of any size, anywhere in the World.

At any one time, night or day three of the above would be together on the bridge and each one perfectly capapble of dropping what they were doing to assist each other in conning the ship.

On the other hand, the Californian and most 3 Mate vessels (which was probably 95% of the fleet) had but 2 Master Mariner FG Certificates on board... the Chief Officer and the Captain. Consequently there would be but one time when the bridge was manned by 2 MMs... the 4 to 8 Watch , am and Pm. In the case of Californian, Lord did not go to the bridge before 8 pm that night and had every intention of staying there until 4 am had the ship not been stopped for ice. That was standard practice on such ships under the then conditions.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
5,139
649
213
Funchal. Madeira
I understand during the day -- of course, I would assume during the day that ice would be seen probably better than at night.

But what about at night? Is Titanic really the only ship that was going to attempt to move through the ice? I'm just wondering if there are others doing the same and if there were, does anyone know if they took precaution to post extra lookouts?
Hello Stacy.

Titanic had no intention of "moving through the ice". The actions of Captain Smith tell us that he believed that the ice he had been warned about would be long gone before he arrived at the spot where it had previously been. In that part of the word, sea ice gets there first by a south setting current and then by the wind. When it arrives at the north side of the Gulf Stream. it is pushed northward and eastward. However, Smith did not ignore the warnings completely. His men were programmed to look out for the "dregs" of what might just have been left behind. Many forget that these men were very familiar with the area and sea ice so far south was like "hens' teeth" to them
 

Similar threads