Passengers from Sweden


Feb 10, 2008
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Does anyone know the fate of the survivor Carl Jonsson, age 32. The information posted on the web that he had a brother in New Haven, CT is wrong. Thus it's also probably untrue that he gave speeches in New Haven about his rescue. It was Oscar Leander Johansson Palmquist who had a brother in New Haven. I have proof of that. Also, Swedish passenger records show that Carl Jonsson, 32, was headed for Duluth, MN. Any trace of him there? About his home parish, there is none by the name of Kvilleberga. I believe it was Killeberg as one source states. Killeberg was close to where Olga Lundin lived.
 
Feb 10, 2008
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Thanks Lester for your help with the Ellis Island records and the Carpathia manifest. I also found Oscar Johnson,22 in 1912 from Stillingso on Sweden's west coast. He is supposed to have gone to Detroit, MI. Do you or anyone else have anything about his life in Detroit? Even though I signed up for a free trial on Ancestry.com, I don't get access to the Federal censuses and my searches come up empty.
Lilly
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hi Lilly,

Just back from 4 weeks away so I have only just seen your reply. Sorry I have no other informations.

Good luck with your search,
Lester
 
J

John O'Malley

Guest
Does anyone have additional information on Carl Jansson, August Wennerstrom, Oscar Olsson, Carl Jonsson, William Tornquist, Thure Lundstrom, Oskar Hedman and Einar Karlsson. I am looking specifically for accounts that they gave about the disaster. Mainly, I am looking for the accounts from Carl Jansson, August Wennerstrom, Oscar Olsson, Carl Jonsson and William Tornquist where they describe being on collapsible A, and the account from Thure Lundstrom that is referenced on his bio page. Somebody should really write a book on the Swedish passengers, as there seems to have been plenty of them on the ship.
 
Feb 10, 2008
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I am writing the book you are asking for and hope that it will be published in 1912. There were 123 Swedish passengers on the Titanic, and 34 of them survived. They have been accounted for by Wetterholm in Swedish, but I'm concentrating on the survivor's own recollections in English.
 
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John O'Malley

Guest
Do you know where I could find Wetterholm's book, and if it has been published in English at all?

And good luck on your book. I am looking forward to it.
 
Feb 10, 2008
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Wetterholm's book is out of print. It was only published in Swedish. But most of his comments have been translated, badly, I might add, and posted on this site. The names of all the Jonsson, Johansson, Janson, etc. are very confusing, therefore there are errors, and probably always will be.
 
Jan 4, 2007
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Could I please be allowed to make a suggestion, which I pray will be followed: can't somebody do a book on all Scandinavians aboard Titanic? That would be so nice and convenient for everyone . . . yes . . .

Carl Jonssen (or Jansson) came through Chicago on Thursday, April 25---apparently alone . . .

Lundstrom came through Chicago with Karin Abelseth, also on Thursday. He left an account.

Carl Jonsson was with Oscar Hedman, on their way to Minnesota. Miss Anna Sherblom was with them. They arrived in Chicago on Wednesday night, Apr. 24.

News items on these people have been posted on ET . . . and also THS . . .

Jansson's account:

Chicago American, Thursday, April 25, 1912, p. 2, c. 4:

TITANIC VICTIM IN CHICAGO TELLS OF
OFFICER’S SELF-DEATH
__________________________________


Remarkable strength of Carl Janson, another of the surviving passengers of the Titanic, kept him alive in the frigid ocean for six hours, hanging to a door with twenty others after the ship sunk. Janson reached Chicago today and told of his terrifying experiences when the queen of the seas went down.

Janson is twenty-one and a robust young man. He was a third cabin passenger and after the wreck was nearly frozen to death. When he reached New York the White Star Line gave him a cheap suit of clothes, an overcoat and $10 in money to sign a release of the line from further damages. Janson lost $50 and all his luggage on the boat.

Janson saw Chief Officer Murdock shoot himself just before the last boat was launched. He gave a graphic story of the sinking of the great liner with its human freight. His story proves that the passengers almost two hours after the ship struck were not warned of the danger that confronted them. The steerage passengers especially, even when told to get up, were given the information that “there is not great danger.”

“I had gone to bed,” said Janson, “and was asleep when I was awakened by stewards, who called out that the ship had struck an iceberg, but that there was no great danger. They told us, however, to get up. That was about 11:30, or more than an hour and five minutes after the Titanic had struck the iceberg.

“I arose and dressed, even putting on my overcoat before going on deck. There did not appear to be any great excitement in the steerage quarters. I went to the top deck. No one attempted to stop me.

“Women and children only were allowed to come out of the steerage after that. Shortly before the last boat was launched I glanced toward the bridge and saw the chief officer place a revolver in his mouth and shoot himself. His body topped overboard. I waited for the last boat to leave and then jumped overboard myself. I was swimming not more than twenty feet from the ship when she upended and went down.
The Titanic did not break in two, though there were two explosions. I saw her propellers as she went under. The suction was small. A door from the wreck was flung near me and I grasped it with more than twenty others. We clung to that door for hours. One by one the others slipped off and sank.

The water after the sinking of the Titanic was dotted with persons and floating ice cakes. The cries and moans continued for hours. I cannot see why more could not have been rescued. It was 7 in the morning when I was picked up.”

Janson left on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway to-day for Swedeburg. Neb., where he has a brother.
__________________________________________
 
Mar 18, 2008
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>>Could I please be allowed to make a suggestion, which I pray will be followed: can't somebody do a book on all Scandinavians aboard Titanic? That would be so nice and convenient for everyone . . . yes . . .<<

The only book at the moment I know which also has some stuff about the Scandinavians aboard is Titanic by Claes-Göran Wetterholm in Swedish language.
 
Feb 10, 2008
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As I mentioned earlier, I'm writing a book about the Swedes on the Titanic. Carl Olof Jansson was over 6 ft tall. Why are you interested in him?
Are you related somehow? I know where he was born. Some of those accounts were exaggerated. I would like to know what happened to another Karl Jansson/Johnson,who survived, the one who was 25 and from Killeberg, Sweden.
 

Sally@Hichens

Member
Apr 30, 2010
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Near Dorking, Surrey, England
Hi

I have been very interested about the swedish aboard Titanic as my husband is from Gotland. I think people would be interested to know that swedish was the second most spoken language after english. Tom, your article is very interesting. Have you any more like this?
 
Feb 10, 2008
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Sally, Since your family was from Gotland, do you know who the husband of Hulda Lofquist was? She was supposed to be the widow of the brother of Klas Albin Klase'n, or Klasson, from Fliseryd, but which brother? Do you know when he died and where? You can also find me on Facebook.
 
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John O'Malley

Guest
Thomas, thank you very much for the information which you have provided. Also, I would be very greatful indeed if you posted Lundstrom's account, as I have been hunting for it for a while. Also, if you have access to any other accounts from the men listed above, that would be very convenient as well. Do you have access to Carl Jonsson's (Johnson?) account where he claimed to have clung to a door?

I have ordered a copy of Wetterholm's book and am currently awaiting its arrival. I'm not fluent in Swedish but I can usually get the gist of it when I'm reading it. Hopefully the book will answer some of my questions. I also anxiously await Lilly Setterdahl's book.

Keep up the good research folks.
 
Jan 4, 2007
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John---

You'll have to wait, I don't know where it is . . . I thought I had posted it, but apparently not . . . and also my diskettes are in some disarray . . . indeed, I've posted almost everything I had already, however, I still have some scraps, and the Lundstrom article is one of them, only I don't know where it is . . . have patience . . . it's out there, and I know of it, and you'll have it . . . it may be awhile though . . .

Hmmmm, I wonder about that Danish fellow, Wichfeld---why was he always wedded to women with links to Titanic?

Lilly's book should've been written ten years ago!
Regards,
Tom
 
Jan 4, 2007
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Lilly:

Yes, wonderful . . . now if only someone would combine all Scandinavians in one tome, well that would be most convenient and handy . . .

John---anything posted had to come from a news item, including Johnson being on a door (actually A collapsible), though I'm not sure which item . . .

My plea---How much longer must we all wait?
 
Feb 10, 2008
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Well, Denmark had only 14 passengers, 2 saved, Finland, had 63, 20 saved, so the Swedes were definitely in the majority among the Scandinavian. It's enough work, believe me.
 
Jan 4, 2007
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Lilly:

Yes, all right---it is understandable, though maybe, perhaps, you could include an appendix listing the other Scandinavians---just for everybody's reference . . .

All await your book!
 

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