Paying homage to Mr Thomas J Crapper

Dec 2, 2000
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Sounds to me like the doors were rigged to the flushing valve by way of mechanical links. From a techanical aspect, that wouldn't be at all difficult to arrange, although it would probably be annoying to have to fix.

Since I make my book money selling plumbing these days, I'd like to see how it was set up.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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Please, someone tell me that the odd looking gizmo sink with a cistern on top seen next to berths in Titanic's 3rd class cabins and crew accomodation (in the Olympic photos) were old fashioned wash-basins and not for body waste? Yuk otherwise!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Yes, they were washbasins. However, some of the passengers might have regarded them as more versatile. Especially when stricken by 'mal de mer'...
 

Arun Vajpey

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Yes, they were washbasins. However, some of the passengers might have regarded them as more versatile. Especially when stricken by 'mal de mer'...
Please, I can't even begin to think about it and so I'll assume that you're pulling my leg! But I wonder what people did when kids or people above a certain age got up in the middle of the night to pee? If the public loos were not nearby, the washbasin, placed at a 'convenient' height as it was, must have been tempting.
 

Bob Godfrey

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More than just tempting, Arun! There were people on that ship who'd never seen a flushing toilet, let alone used one. Chamber pots were an essential part of everyday life back then (and much later), and I'm sure there were at least a few passengers who were very impressed at the nicely mounted examples they found in their cabins. One thing I've discovered in my long life is the general principle that what can be done will be done.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>One thing I've discovered in my long life is the general principle that what can be done will be done. <<

Let me put it this way: It's been known to happen with display toilets, in the middle of the store, and in public! (Which makes me glad I didn't have to clean it up!)
 
May 3, 2005
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I wonder what happened to the Titanic sewage. If anybody knows or suspects, I would be happy to recieve
an answer.
Most likely it was just discharged at sea .
How was this done while the ship was in Port ?

I found a source for some infornation on the Internet that said that today, ships must be at least 12 miles from land for doing this.
 
May 3, 2005
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More than just tempting, Arun! There were people on that ship who'd never seen a flushing toilet, let alone used one. Chamber pots were an essential part of everyday life back then (and much later), and I'm sure there were at least a few passengers who were very impressed at the nicely mounted examples they found in their cabins. One thing I've discovered in my long life is the general principle that what can be done will be done.
There is a scene in the ca.1939 movie "The Grapes Of Wrath" where a little "Okie" boy and girl go exploring in what must have been a community toilet on the migrant campground. They pull the chain on one of the flush toiilets and the water begins to run and flush the toilets. The kids run out , screaming, afraid they've broken
something l LOL
 
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May 3, 2005
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There was also a story that the following was a regular routine when the ship was at sea.:
Early in the morning, stewards (and I suppose stewardeses) would be lining the rails and emptying the chamber pots over the side and/or stern.
 
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May 3, 2005
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And what happened with the seawage from the Titanic?
Bastian, once again, I think this has been covered on the first page of this thread.
I over looked that on my reply.

But, once Titanic was at sea, sewage , both from chamber pots and toilets would be simply discharged into the ocean.

My question remains as to how this was managed when a ship was tied up while in was in a port, such as in Southampton ...... and New York.....If Titanic had reached New York ?

Also at Cherbourg and Queenstown since Titanic was certainly closer to land than 12 miles, if that regulation had been in effect in 1912 ?

Were there any holding tanks as such or connections for discharging sewage while in Port ?

Moderator's note: Moderator's note: Edited to remove material responding to a message left in a different discussion when this message and the one before it were moved here. MAB
 
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Mike Spooner

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Jan 31, 2018
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In Titanic The Ship Magnificent book, there is a photo showing were the sanitary water discharge point on the starboard side near the anchor. Taken by Father Brown setting off from Queenstown.