Peak Tank Rooms on Orlop and Tanktop Decks


Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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Fore- and afterpeak tanks are normally used as drinking water reservoirs. Being at the extremities of the ship they also exert a significant MCT (moment to change trim) and can therefore be used to quickly trim ship.

They can also be 'pressed up' with seawater for this purpose but would need to be flushed out with fresh before being returned to proper use.

The peak tanks are specifically excluded from the revenue-earning (i.e.cargo-carrying ) cubic of the vessel.

Anchor cable is worked from the chain lockers located further aft.

The forepeak tank, when full, can also help to inhibit the debilitating phenomenon of 'panting' - the working in and out of the bow plating in heavy weather.

I've known the peak tanks to have been used to help 'hog' general cargo vessels. This slightly elevates the amidships load line so that more cargo revenue can be 'legally' earned. Hogging is not good practice because it can shorten the life of the ship. Immediately, it also adversely affects the steering and seakeeping properties because it imparts disproportionate inertia towards the extremities of the vessel.

NFJ
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Fore- and afterpeak tanks are normally used as drinking water reservoirs. Being at the extremities of the ship they also exert a significant MCT (moment to change trim) and can therefore be used to quickly trim ship.<<

Huh?
eh.gif
Sources please. Salt water, which is normally used for ballesting and trimming is not generally regarded as drinkable.

Check the plans at https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/deckplans/deckplan_tanktop.shtml and you'll see that the fresh water tanks were located on both sides of the Electrical Generator Rooms. Not the peak tanks. This same information is also indicated in the plans reproduced in Eaton & Haas "Titanic, Triumph and Tragedy"

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Erik Wood

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Aug 24, 2000
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Salt water, which is normally used for ballesting and trimming is not generally regarded as drinkable. Said Mike S.

I agree with Mike S. on this one. My plans show fresh water on both sides of the Electical Generator Rooms. Usually ballast or trim tanks have no connections to the fresh water supply and newly purified water has no way to get to these tanks. Usually it is pumped in sea water. I am a little confused have I missed something???

Erik
 

Erik Wood

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Another piece of info is:

I've known the peak tanks to have been used to help 'hog' general cargo vessels. This slightly elevates the amidships load line so that more cargo revenue can be 'legally' earned. Hogging is not good practice because it can shorten the life of the ship. Immediately, it also adversely affects the steering and seakeeping properties because it imparts disproportionate inertia towards the extremities of the vessel. So said Mr. Jones.

I have actually seen this done on container vessels and recall one such vessel M\T Erica that did this as regular practice. Not to many years later she broke up in a storm. This also has adverse effect on the machinery and shaft, as overloading the vessel has a bad habit of forcing the engines to put out more RPMS then it can safely do, and often causes fuel to burn at higher less efficent rate. Shafts have been known to break casing's (This happened on the Tropicale before her conversion).

I don't really understand because I am a "throttle jockey" and not a "snipe" how that works exactly but I can tell you that over loading a vessel no matter how you do it (legal or otherwise) will play havoc with the ships framework and her machinery.

Ooopss, I forgot that Lloyds doesn't want me to call ships she anymore, it is suppose to be "it".

Several of the older container vessels that had a wheel house forward and a deck house aft where taken out of the Matson fleet because of improper loading techniques that eventually caused the cracking of the keel. Plus the engines where just tired of hauling extra weight.

Erik
 

Bill Sauder

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"Ooopss, I forgot that Lloyds doesn't want me to call ships she anymore, it is suppose to be "it"."

Lloyds can go to hell.

Bill Sauder
 

Cal Haines

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Nov 20, 2000
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Hi Noel,

Welcome aboard! You sound like you really know your way around ships. We can always use another knowledgeable hand!

Hi Mike,

Titanic carried fresh water in other tanks in addition to the FW tanks athwart the dynamo room. She had a FW tank at the forward end of #3 hold. At least one of the tanks (probably a wing tank) under each boiler room contained fresh water for use as emergency feed water, should the main feed pumps fail. Check pages 64 & 65 of "Triumph & Tragedy": she sailed with at least 900+ tons of fresh water in the tanks under the recip. engine room and aft boiler rooms. I've also seen a reference to Olympic sailing with her double bottom full of fresh water. However, the peak tanks are consistently marked WB (water ballast), so they probably were not used as primary fresh water tanks.

Cal
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Thanks Cal. What I'm wondering however is the source for the following comment that Noel made; ">>Fore- and afterpeak tanks are normally used as drinking water reservoirs. Being at the extremities of the ship they also exert a significant MCT (moment to change trim) and can therefore be used to quickly trim ship.<<"

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Erik Wood

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Bill,

I completely agree, in fact recently while on a trip in the Great Lakes I called the local VTS when they asked for my draft I said "She is....". That was received by a flurry of radio traffic about Lloyds going to hell. I will continue to and always have called ships she.

Erik
 

Erik Wood

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Lloyds needs to stick to giving ships numbers and not making shipping policy. They are notorious for being out of the loop and causing more problems then being of any real use.

Erik
 

Bill Sauder

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Mark:

I am told about 500 times each day that I must "celebrate the diversity and traditions" of others.

Now it's my turn to celebrate my centuries-old tradition. Ships are she.

Bill Sauder
 

Erik Wood

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Sure does. I have a mind to go and tell Lloyd that it needs to get on a ship and hopefully the ship will sink. But I wouldn't wish that on a ship, ships are to proud for that, besided I
know that SHE wouldn't like Lloyd either.

Erik
 

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