Personnel decisions impelling collision


Arun Vajpey

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Captain Smith RIP was wrong, you cant argue about that since his ship is in the bottom of the ocean. He trusted his people to supply him information but he didnt establish strict routine practices other then the common ones which didnt match the ice warnings that they recived and caused them to miss at least 2 warnings that were important.
Sorry to hijack this quote from another thread, but I felt that it was more relevant here.

IMO, there is something in what James is saying although I think it would be difficult to use the word "wrong" where a chain of interconnected events might have contributed to the disaster. After all, at the end of the day the Captain was also a human being and none of us are perfect.

I do believe that Captain Smith might have been rather lax in making his presence felt on board the Titanic. Several works comment about lifeboat drills not carried out, which IMO would have been important if, again as some works claim, the Welin davits being used were of a relatively new type. And yes, I also feel (especially after reading Paul Lee's article http://www.paullee.com/titanic/icewarnings.php) that there should have been a better organized routine for ALL ice warnings to be handed to the bridge and thereafter posted in the chart room. Phillips and Bride might not have been White Star employees, but once on board the Titanic, they too would be subject to carrying out Captain Smith's instructions, even if he could not order them directly in the conventional sense. If Smith had told the radio operators specifically that any ice warning, no matter how trivial, had to be passed to the bridge asap irrespective of the volume of private traffic they had on hand, I am sure they would have followed his instructions. I think the 'scenic route' taken by the Baltic ice warning is an important case in point.
 
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Mike Spooner

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Jim or any other seadog. When the captain and his officers board the ship for a Atlantic crossing, how much time do they need beforehand casting off? If it is time consuming what sort of jobs are they doing to?
 

Jim Currie

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Jim or any other seadog. When the captain and his officers board the ship for a Atlantic crossing, how much time do they need beforehand casting off? If it is time consuming what sort of jobs are they doing to?
Apart from the normal ship's business involved when a ship leaves port, the captain would have little else to do but receive the readiness report from his department heads. They would have very many things to do depending on the department.
 

James B

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Jim or any other seadog. When the captain and his officers board the ship for a Atlantic crossing, how much time do they need beforehand casting off? If it is time consuming what sort of jobs are they doing to?

How much work for the Officers before cast off, a day or so?
There are no strict rules, just common practice, Its diffrent when recieving anew ship: lots of meetings, familiarizations and many inspections which are mostly done by the chief officer (24/7 up, down and all around). During routine crew changes in ports its till few hours before vessel leaves port unless the top 4 joiners (C/O, 1/E, C/E, Captain) are new in the company or newly promoted, in this case they will stay till the next port of call.

Ps, thats relevet for today, no idea what were the procedures before.
 

Mike Spooner

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When I question how much work is required by Officers before sail off, I do mean in the Titanic days. As to day at Southampton is very different with cruise ships more than twice the size of Titanic can arrive early morning 6.00 on, and start leaving by1600 hour on the same day. Truly run like a military operation indeed.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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When I question how much work is required by Officers before sail off, I do mean in the Titanic days. As to day at Southampton is very different with cruise ships more than twice the size of Titanic can arrive early morning 6.00 on, and start leaving by1600 hour on the same day. Truly run like a military operation indeed.
Yes it's pretty impressive. There's a few docu's on how they do that today. Well at least how it was before the cruise business got shut down. Titanic's time didn't have many of the advantages they do today like drive on fork lifts and such to load/unload the ships that some of them have. Plus I forget how long it took to recoal Titanic but it wasn't as fast pumping the tanks full of oil.
 

Mike Spooner

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I forgot to mention Custom clearance is required before anything is allowed off or on to the ship.
I wander if it was the same in the Titanic days to?
 
Nov 14, 2005
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I forgot to mention Custom clearance is required before anything is allowed off or on to the ship.
I wander if it was the same in the Titanic days to?
Being that import/export fee's were a major part of financing the govt I'm sure they kept a close watch on that. But I've also read that today a very small percentage of cargo actually gets physically inspected. It's been a major concern for the security people. In the previous post I said oil. Probably should have said diesel fuel.
 
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